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Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Aaron Rodgers on Ryan Braun: There Should Be Some Sort of Confidentiality

In case you haven’t heard, Ryan Braun reportedly recently failed a drug test.  Considering he was named MVP of the National League, that is pretty significant news.  If it is determined that Braun is guilty after he goes through the appeal process, he would face a 50-game suspension and an enormous hit to his reputation.  Aaron Rodgers, who is admittedly good friends with Braun, offered his thoughts on the matter during an interview with WTMJ-4 in Milwaukee on Monday.  During the discussion, Rodgers raised a valid point about whether or not test results should be made public before they are confirmed.

“Unfortunately in a situation like this, in the public court of opinion, you’re always guilty before proven innocent,” Rodgers said. “Which is obviously the inverse to the regular judicial system. There should be some form of confidentiality when it comes to this. That’s probably the most disappointing thing about this case with Ryan. … It takes a lifetime for you to build a reputation and a quick second for it to be washed away.”

In a separate interview, Rodgers told WAUK in Milwaukee “I am just trusting that my good friend has not been using anything that’s illegal and I’m very confident that that is the case. I know how he cares about the integrity of the game and wouldn’t do anything to jeopardize that.”

No player has ever failed a test for performance-enhancing drugs in the MLB and won their appeal.  With that in mind, there is likely bad news on the horizon for Braun and Brewers fans.  Rodgers is right, however, about a reputation being destroyed in an instant. If there is even a slight possibility that the test was flawed or there is a legitimate explanation for Braun failing it, why should his name be publicly associated with cheating?  Unfortunately, 2011 has no use for withholding information until it is confirmed.

Thanks to the Journal Sentinel for passing the story along.



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