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White Sox Pitching Coach Don Cooper Hangs Up on Radio Show (Audio)

The 2011 Chicago White Sox season has been immersed in questions since almost day one. Chicago was already loaded with veterans and power hitters heading into the season, yet they still decided to add Adam Dunn to their lineup. Currently toting a record of 47-51 — good for 4.5 games out of first place in the AL Central — the White Sox have absolutely nothing to show for the money spent in the offseason.

Manager Ozzie Guillen has done his best to take pressure off his squad, but things seem to be getting worse.  For starters, Dunn and Alex Rios — two of the team’s premier names — are currently two of the worst hitters in the league.  With an average of .212, Rios is somehow hitting significantly higher than Dunn’s .158.  Jake Peavy’s health has also been an issue, as surprising as that may seem.

The level of frustration has clearly taken its toll on the entire Chicago coaching staff, as pitching coach Don Cooper showcased on Thursday when he hung up on The Mulley and Hanley Show on WSCR-AM 670 in Chicago.  Here’s how the conversation went prior to Cooper cutting it short, courtesy of the Chicago Tribune:

“I have no clue about that. I’m a coach,” Cooper barked when asked whether or not the team should call up prospect Dayan Viciedo. “Do I feel like something (needs to be done)? Yeah, we have to score some runs. That’s what’s got to be done. And if we do, we have a chance to win. And if we don’t, we won’t.

“Nice try, asking me to bring up (bleeping) Viciedo. I’m not in charge of making moves, I’m in charge of coaching.”

Here’s the audio of the phone call:

Cooper gave them the reverse Bill Walton treatment after host Brian Hanley insisted he wasn’t trying to put him on the spot with the question.  Viciedo is hitting .311 with 16 homers and 64 RBI in Triple-A this season, so the question is a fair one.  He can’t possibly produce any less than Rios or Dunn, right?  Needless to say, the future looks grim for the White Sox in 2011.

Fist pound to CBSSports.com’s Eye on Baseball.

 



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