Quantcast

Roy Jones Jr. Is Still Fighting. Why?

Roy Jones Jr. is 42 years old, 54-7 overall, and he’s lost his last two fights in a row. Sadly, like so many other former legends in the ring, Jones Jr. hasn’t figured out that it’s time to quit and instead he continues to sully his once pristine legacy every time he takes the ring.

Luckily for him, most fans don’t notice.

Jones Jr. has signed on to fight yet again, this time against Denis Lebedev on May 22 in Moscow. They’ll fight at cruiserweight where Roy hopes the 200-pound weight limit will give him advantage over his 31-year-old opponent.

The way he’s looked his last two fights — a loss to Bernard Hopkins and this butt kicking by Danny Green — the only ring he should be worried about is the one he aspires to receive in heaven.

[Read more...]

Bernard Hopkins and Mike Jones Want you to Neuter Your Pit Bull (Video)

Philadelphia boxers Bernard Hopkins and Mike Jones are supporting a pit bull spaying and neutering campaign based out of Camden, New Jersey called “Project Knock Out.” The project offers people to have their pits fixed for free in Camden to the non-profit New Jersey Aid for Animals. Talking about the project, Hopkins says “I’m happy to lend my name and likeness to this great cause.” For the animal lovers, check out this behind-the-scenes video of pit bulls getting photographed in the ring to promote the campaign:

Next time, I say he and Mike Vick should team up on a pit bull effort. For more info, you can go to the NJAFA website.

Nonito Donaire Leaves Bob Arum’s Top Rank for Golden Boy Promotions

A shock was sent through the business side of boxing Wednesday when it was announced that Nonito Donaire would be leaving promoter Bob Arum’s Top Rank for Oscar De La Hoya’s Golden Boy Promotions. This is just the latest twist in an ongoing saga between the rival promotional groups, and there is little doubt it is a massive gain for Golden Boy.

Nonito Donaire is one of the top pound-for-pound fighters in the world and an emerging star in the sport of boxing. The 28-year-old has been moving up in weight class steadily and picking up fans along the way while posting a 26-1 record. The Filipino Flash’s most recent fight was an eye-opening second-round knockout of Fernando Montiel last month that rearranged his opponent’s face.

Donaire has speed, power, and size for a bantamweight. Whether or not he can become as big as Manny Pacquiao in terms of popularity remains to be seen, but we do know that Donaire is an emerging star.

That’s why his promotional sidestep is so significant for boxing.

[Read more...]

Zab Judah Thinks he can Beat Manny Pacquiao and Wants the Fight

I used to be a huge Zab Judah fan for a simple reason — he has Jewish roots and was shouted out in a Wu Tang song. That’s about as unbeatable of a combination as possible. But Zab went from being a promising southpaw in the light welterweight division to someone who lacked focus and a proper work ethic to succeed. He lost three fights in a row from 2006-2007, falling to Carlos Baldomir, Floyd Mayweather Jr., and Miguel Cotto. Three fights later, he lost to Joshua Clottey. While the losses to Floyd and Cotto were understandable, Zab is too good to have ever lost to guys like Baldomir and Clottey, but that’s what happened.

Zab has said he’s rededicating himself to the sweet science and has put together a nice run of five straight victories, including a split decision win over Lucas Matthyesse in November. Super Judah now has two light welterweight belts and apparently has his goals set pretty high. Not surprisingly, he wants a piece of Manny Pacquiao, though not for a lack of respect.

Judah told Boxing Scene that though he respects Pacquiao and what Manny has done, he’d like to get with Manny in the ring because he knows he can beat him. He says the matchup of speed and southpaws would be intriguing, but I think Manny would own him.

Though I respect Zab’s lofty goals, I feel like he’s in a long line of fighters who want their shot at Manny. Why is that? Because Pacquiao’s the most popular figure in the sport, and a fight against him brings major guaranteed money and publicity. There’s no shame in losing to Manny and at least you get compensated handsomely. If you win, then you’ve done something historic. Fighting Pacquiao is a win-win proposition for any of his potential opponents.

Tom Zbikowski Boxing Again in 2 Weeks

Baltimore Ravens safety Tom Zbikowski improved to 2-0 in his professional boxing career with a first-round win over Richard Bryant Saturday. If the first-round knockout didn’t convince you that Bryant was a bum, maybe the news that Zbikowski will be fighting again in two weeks should.

Zbikowski announced on both his twitter and facebook account that he has another fight set up for March 26th in Atlantic City. The card will be on HBO and feature the following four fights:

Yuriorkis Gamboa (19-0) vs. Jorge Solis (40-2-2)
Miguel Garcia (24-0) vs. Matt Remillard (23-0)
Jorge Diaz (15-0) vs. Teon Kennedy (16-0-1)
Glen Tapia (8-0) vs. Eberto Medina (5-5)

Zbikowski will fit in on the undercard in some capacity, and I’m sure it will be another cupcake opponent. Like I said, Bob Arum is going to try and ride the Tommy train as long as he can until the NFL figures out its labor situation. He’s moving quickly.

Tommy Zbikowski Scores 1st Round Knockout of Richard Bryant on Body Shot

Ravens safety Tommy Zbikowski is now 2-0 in his professional boxing career after beating Richard Bryant with a first-round knockout in Las Vegas Saturday evening. Bryant was belted squarely beneath the ribcage (as you can see in the picture above) and was knocked out for the count 1:45 into the fight. The first-round victory marked Zbikowski’s second first-round knockout of his career, but it didn’t come without questions.

First off, Zbikowski took way too many shots in the fight. He was hit several times by a below average opponent who’s now 1-3 — that shouldn’t happen against inferior competition and it makes me think Zbikowski could use a lot more training on his defense. Secondly, there was a delayed reaction from Bryant after the body shot raising questions about the legitimacy of the knockdown.

I don’t dispute that Zbikowski hurt Bryant badly with the shot straight to the chest, but I wonder how Bryant could have been damaged enough to be knocked out, yet well enough to throw two more punches after absorbing the blow. Does that make much sense to you? Maybe it was just a delayed reaction to a massive strike, but it leaves me with a few questions. Either way, Zbikowski moves to 2-0 while Bryant falls to 1-3. One can’t help but figure Bob Arum will ride the Zbikowski train until the NFL’s labor issues are solved. Because of his football roots, he’ll be a draw regardless of the low quality of opponent he faces.

Ricardo Mayorga Loses to Miguel Cotto After Dislocating Thumb, Retires

Ricardo Mayorga hung with Miguel Cotto for 11 rounds of their bout Saturday evening in Las Vegas before succumbing in the 12th. The Nicaraguan mauler gave Cotto everything he had but got his hand caught as the fighters exchanged hooks and got his thumb dislocated. Mayorga was knocked down on the exchange by Cotto, beat the count, but later told the referee he could not continue.

The initial reaction from fans was that Mayorga quit in the fight, but we later learned he dislocated his thumb on the exchange. Steve Kim at Max Boxing was all over the injury, observing that “It looks like Mayorga may have dislocated his left arm in that exchange. He calls the fight off because of it.” It turned out that Mayorga dislocated his thumb, saying post-fight “I felt my thumb touch the back of my hand. I hate the way this fight ended.” The judges all had Cotto up 107-102 (eight rounds to three) at the time of the TKO.

After the fight, Mayorga announced in his interview that he planned to retire. Mayorga is 38 years old, had taken two years off from ’08-’10, and is now 1-1 since returning. He’s now 29-8 in his career, still a showman, but maybe feels like he’s had enough. I’m guessing the injury and loss contributed to his feeling and I wouldn’t hold him to his word. He may change his view in time.