pixel 1
header
Monday, December 11, 2017

Ezekiel Elliott

Report: Jerry Jones considered suing NFL over Ezekiel Elliott suspension

Ezekiel Elliott

Jerry Jones has reportedly threatened to sue the NFL’s six-owner compensation committee that has been tasked with negotiating Roger Gooodell’s extension, and that is apparently not the first time this year that the Dallas Cowboys owner has considered taking legal action against the league.

According to ESPN investigative reporters Seth Wickersham and Don Van Natta Jr., Jones was so angry over Goodell’s decision to suspend Ezekiel Elliott six games that he considered suing the league to have the ban overturned.

On Aug. 11, Goodell announced the six-game suspension of Elliott. Jones saw it as a “complete betrayal,” a source now says. “An overcorrection” by Goodell, Jones later called it publicly. Privately, Jones seethed to confidants that Goodell hadn’t studied the case’s many details, and he considered suing the NFL to get the suspension overturned. “Roger blew off his own investigator’s conclusion — it’s just patently unfair,” Jones told a confidant, a charge that a league source denies. Jones had turned on Goodell, perhaps for good.

Jones had said publicly that he was confident Elliott would not be suspended, and he expressed those beliefs privately as well. A lot of that had to do with the NFL’s own director of investigations, Kia Roberts, concluding that the woman who accused Elliott of domestic violence was not credible. Roberts recommended to Goodell that Elliott not be suspended based on the interviews she conducted.

After Jones spoke with Goodell about the case in May, he reportedly told people the commissioner assured him there would be no suspension and that Goodell would only recommend Elliott enter counseling and issue a statement. The NFL insists no such assurances were ever given.

It’s not a coincidence that Jones was said to be in support of Goodell getting an extension before Elliott was suspended. Since then, the Cowboys owner has done everything in his power to impede the contract negotiations, and one league executive told ESPN Jones has issued a very strong warning to Goodell.

“Jerry’s message to Roger was ‘I run this league. You better get with it,'” the exec said. “This is about power and control, not the contract. That’s all white noise.”

From the way it appears, most team owners are siding with Goodell over Jones. We have heard reports that Jones’ peers could consider taking drastic measures to silence him, but that seems unlikely. In many ways, the war has just begun.

Ezekiel Elliott drops appeal, will serve six-game suspension

Ezekiel Elliott

Ezekiel Elliott’s legal battle with the NFL is over.

In a statement released by his agents, Elliott announced that his appeal against the NFL is being dropped and he will serve out the entirety of his six game suspension effective immediately.

Timing almost certainly plays a factor. By ending his appeal now, Elliott will be able to return Dec. 24 against the Seattle Seahawks, which would also mean that, should the Cowboys make the playoffs, he’d be back in time and get two regular season games under his belt to prepare himself.

ESPN’s Adam Schefter also noted that, by the time Elliott’s pending legal matters were resolved, he’d have served most, if not all, of the suspension anyway.

Elliott has explained previously why he had no intention of ending his legal proceedings to fight the suspension, but that has obviously changed. The realities of the situation have likely outweighed his desire to prove his innocence.

Ezekiel Elliott reportedly leaving country to train during suspension

Ezekiel Elliott

Ezekiel Elliott’s last legal option for the time being was exhausted earlier this week when the Second Circuit Court denied an emergency injunction that would have blocked his suspension. Now that there’s nothing else Elliott can do to have the six-game ban overturned, he has decided there is no reason for him to remain in the United States.

Ian Rapoport of NFL Network reported on Sunday that Elliott is leaving the country to clear his head and train in an “undisclosed location” until he is eligible to return to the Dallas Cowboys.

Elliott’s next hearing won’t be until Dec. 1, so he is going to miss at least the next four games. He will in all likelihood miss the full six, and Rapoport noted that the star running back isn’t planning to return from his overseas training until late December.

Elliott recently explained why he has been so intent on trying to get his suspension overturned, but ultimately he didn’t stand much of a chance against the NFL. While the circumstances are far different, his case is not all that different from Tom Brady’s Deflategate case from a procedural standpoint. We all know how that turned out after a lengthy legal battle.

Latest Ezekiel Elliott emergency motion denied by court

Ezekiel Elliott

Ezekiel Elliott is suspended again after the Second Circuit Court denied his emergency injunction to block his suspension.

The temporary stay that had allowed Elliott to play has also been lifted, meaning Elliott’s suspension will resume immediately, though an appellate court will hear the appeal on an expedited basis.

The NFL is subsequently free to reinstate Elliott’s six-game suspension, which they likely will.

Stay tuned, as this is almost certainly not the last trick Elliott’s lawyers have up their sleeve. If the player’s comments are anything to go off of, he’s going to fight this suspension in court as long as he possibly can.

Oral arguments on Ezekiel Elliott motion will be heard on Thursday

Ezekiel Elliott

The next step in the ongoing legal saga surrounding Dallas Cowboys running back Ezekiel Elliott has been scheduled for Thursday when the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit will hear oral arguments for an emergency injunction motion of Elliott’s suspension.

Last Friday, Judge Susan Carney of the Second Circuit issued an administrative stay of Elliott’s suspension, which unexpectedly allowed him to return to the Cowboys and play on Sunday against the Kansas City Chiefs. Prior to that, his six-game suspension had been put back into place and appeared rock solid for the first time all year.

With oral arguments taking place on Thursday at 2:00 p.m. ET, a ruling should be made prior to the Cowboys’ Week 10 game against the Atlanta Falcons.

If Thursday’s motion is denied, Elliott’s six-game suspension will be back on and he’ll be forced to leave the team unless his legal team wins their appeal of the district court’s decision. If the motion is granted, Elliott will be eligible to continue playing until the the district court’s ruling on the denial of the injunction.

Ultimately, this battle between the NFL and Elliott/the NFLPA rages on and appears no closer to being resolved.

Ezekiel Elliott wants to prove he is ‘not an abuser’

Ezekiel Elliott

Ezekiel Elliott has a strong explanation for why he continues to fight his suspension at every turn.

Elliott has been involved in an ongoing legal situation that seems to change every other week. He spent nearly a year waiting for the NFL to rule on his domestic violence case, and they finally did so in August. Elliott was suspended six games for a violation of the league’s Personal Conduct Policy.

The Dallas Cowboys running back appealed the suspension, then filed in court to have the suspension blocked. He was granted an injunction blocking the suspension, but that was lifted earlier this week. Then he was granted on Friday a stay of one week, allowing him to play this weekend.

So why has he gone through all these steps? Elliott says it’s to protect his reputation.

Elliott was accused of abusing his ex-girlfriend five times in the span of a week in 2016. He has maintained his innocence. Ohio authorities investigated the case but did not charge Elliott because they found the woman’s story to not be credible in some instances.

An interesting twist to the case is that there is reportedly a conflict of interest with the judge who ruled this week that Elliott must serve the suspension.

Potential conflict of interest arises with latest Ezekiel Elliott ruling

Ezekiel Elliott

A federal judge ruled in favor of the NFL on Monday and decided to lift the temporary restraining order that was blocking Ezekiel Elliott’s six-game suspension, and some questions are being raised about whether or not that judge was impartial.

Pro Football Talk’s Mike Florio noticed on Tuesday that Judge Katherine Polk Failla, who decided that Elliott’s six-game ban should be reinstated, works for the law firm that represented the NFL when the latest collective bargaining agreement was negotiated.

“My husband is a partner at the law firm of Proskauer Rose LLP,” Judge Failla wrote in a judicial questionnaire she signed in 2012. I would recuse myself from any cases in which Proskauer Rose is a party or is representing a party.”

As Florio notes, Proskauer Rose LLP attorney Bob Batterman, who became known as “Lockout Bob,” was a key figure leading up to the 2011 NFL work stoppage. The league has retained Batterman’s services as recently as 2016, so there is still a fairly strong link there.

Technically, Failla was not required to recuse herself from Elliott’s case. Proskauer Rose LLP, the firm her husband works for, is not actively representing the NFL in Elliott’s case. However, Florio pointed out that the Canon 2 Code of Conduct for United States Judges encourages judges to avoid taking cases when “reasonable minds” could conclude that there are circumstances which may prevent a judge from being completely impartial.

There are probably a lot of angry Cowboys fans who would not fall under the umbrella of “reasonable minds.” However, you can understand why Judge Failla’s connection to the NFL might be seen as a less-than-ideal look.

Page 1 of 1812345...