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Leigh Castergine says Mets fired her for being single and pregnant

Jeff-Wilpon-MetsNew York Mets co-owner Jeff Wilpon is facing a discrimination lawsuit from a former employee. Leigh Castergine, who served as the Mets’ senior vice president for several years, claims she was fired from her position of overseeing ticket sales last month because Wilpon was “morally opposed” to her being single and pregnant.

According to the New York Post, Castergine claims in the suit that Wilpon went out of his way to embarrass her about her pregnancy in front of other team employees.

(Castergine says) in the suit that Wilpon “frequently humiliated [her] in front of others by, among other things, pretending to see if she had an engagement ring on her finger.”

The suit claims Wilpon even stated “in a meeting of the team’s all-male senior executives that he is ‘morally opposed’ to Castergine ‘having this baby without being married.’”

“Wilpon told her that when she gets a ring she will make more money and get a bigger bonus,” the filing claims.

“I am as morally opposed to putting an e-cigarette sign in my ballpark as I am to Leigh having this baby without being married,” Wilpon said in a meeting over a proposed ad deal, according to the suit.

Castergine also alleges that Wilpon warned other Mets employees to ignore her pregnancy and “not rub her belly” because “she’s not sick, she’s pregnant.” After she gave birth in March and returned to work in June, Castergine says she received her first ever negative evaluation from the team when Wilpon told her she wasn’t as “aggressive” as she used to be.

Wilpon allegedly then told Castergine that she wasn’t meeting ticket sales expectations, despite the fact that the Mets were out of contention. She says Wilpon told her he would allow her to keep her job through the end of the year if she kept quiet with her discrimination claims, but Castergine had her lawyer draw up a letter anyway. She claims she was fired just three minutes after Wilpon received an email from her attorney.

While there are two sides to every story, this one doesn’t sound good for Wilpon and company.

Jerry Jones sued by stripper Jana Weckerly for sexual assault

Jerry Jones boob grab

Remember the scandalous photos of Jerry Jones that went viral in August? They showed the Dallas Cowboys owner in sexual poses with a few women who were later identified as strippers. Though the photos are over five years old, the woman who claims she took the photos is suing Jones for alleged sexual assault.

The Dallas Morning News says the suit was filed on Monday. Here are some of the details of the allegations:

Jana Weckerly, 27, from Ardmore, Okla., said Jones fondled her genitals, forced her to touch or rub his penis, and required she watch as the 71-year-old Jones received oral sex from another woman. Weckerly is seeking more than $1 million in punitive damages.
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The lawsuit also alleges Jones conspired to cover up the incident by forcing Weckerly to sign an agreement to conceal the alleged assault.

Weckerly claims the assault occurred in the bathroom of a five-star hotel.

One has to wonder what took Weckerly so long to decide to file the charges. Her attorney Thomas Bowers said his client is in counseling and taking medicine to help her cope with trauma from the incident, which seems odd considering this took place five years ago. It seems pretty obvious that she is looking for a settlement and pay day out of Jerruh.

[Also see: Jerry Jones says pictures misrepresented him]

Shantel Jackson lawsuit against Floyd Mayweather accuses him of threatening her with gun, multiple assaults

Floyd Mayweather Shantel Jackson

Stop me if you’ve heard this before: Floyd Mayweather Jr. is being accused of assaulting one of his girlfriends.

Floyd’s ex-girlfriend/fiancee Shantel Jackson, who broke up with him 4-5 months ago, is now suing the boxer and accusing him of assaulting her multiple times and threatening her with a gun.

Jackson, who is currently dating rapper Nelly, retained Gloria Allred as her attorney and is seeking a jury trial. She hopes to be awarded damages and obtain an injunction/restraining order against Floyd.

According to a statement from Allred, Mayweather committed the following against Jackson:

– invasion of privacy
– assault and battery
– defamation
– false imprisonment

Jackson says she met Floyd in 2006 when she was 21 and working at an Atlanta restaurant. He eventually moved her out to Las Vegas where she became one of his girls. The two eventually became engaged and she stuck with him when he served his jail sentence for domestic violence committed against ex-girlfriend Josie Harris.

According to the statement and complaint from Allred, Jackson says Mayweather first assaulted her in Aug. 2012 after he was released from prison.

“He twisted [her] arm, choked her and forcibly took her phone away from her to look through it,” the complaint states, according to TMZ.

In Feb. 2013, Jackson says she asked Floyd to go to counseling with her. He said he would and never did. She eventually broke up with him in April and moved to Los Angeles, but Floyd wanted her back and sent a jet to fly her back.

Jackson alleges that Floyd assaulted her again when she returned.

Floyd allegedly “bent her arm, restrained her, and pointed a gun at her foot, asking ‘Which toe do you want me to shoot,’ ” according to the complaint.

Despite being engaged to Floyd, she was uncomfortable with the lifestyle as one of his girls. She says he took away her possessions and had his staff members follow her around if she tried to leave the house.

[Related: Miss Jackson broke up with him over all his side girlfriends]

Floyd grew so upset with her he once allegedly demanded at gunpoint that she remove her engagement ring.

The two were not together for a good part of 2013, but Floyd flew Miss Jackson out to Las Vegas for his September fight against Canelo Alvarez last year. The two continued to be intimate, because Shantel says she became pregnant in Nov. 2013 with twins fathered by Floyd. She had an abortion in Jan. 2014.

On May 1, Floyd posted a photo and message on social media indicating that he broke up with Miss Jackson because she got an abortion. This act from Floyd allegedly was in retaliation to Jackson posting a picture on Instagram of her with Nelly.

You know what this tells us? Everything we’ve reported about the relationship between Jackson and Mayweather over the past few years has been accurate. Since 2012, they’ve really been on and off, mostly because of Jackson’s dissatisfaction with Floyd.

You may call her a golddigger for filing the suit, but at least she got the courage to stand up to the abuse from Floyd.

NBA files countersuit against Donald Sterling

Donald SterlingThe sale of the Los Angeles Clippers to former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer became official on Tuesday, and Donald Sterling may end up having to give some of the $2 billion it generated back to the NBA. According to the Los Angeles Times, the NBA has filed a counterclaim against Sterling and the Sterling Family Trust seeking to recover damages stemming from the 80-year-old’s racially charged audio recordings.

The NBA’s suit is in response to Sterling suing the NBA for $1 billion after he was banned from the league for life back in May. As part of the NBA’s constitution, Sterling is supposed to compensate the league for any legal costs that stem from his detrimental conduct. The league is also seeking compensation for the money it spent to investigate Sterling’s comments and impose discipline on him.

In addition, the NBA has argued in its counterclaim that Sterling didn’t have the right to file a lawsuit against the league on behalf of the Sterling Family Trust to begin with. Two doctors declared Sterling mentally incapacitated before his antitrust suit, which means he did not have control of the trust.

We all know Sterling loves a good court battle, but it doesn’t seem like he is going to end up on the winning end of many of these cases. He has already lost his team and the NBA doesn’t seem concerned that he has any legal ground to stand on.

Tony Bosch surrenders to DEA; A-Rod’s cousin Yuri Sucart arrested

Tony-Bosch-arrested

Biogenesis founder Tony Bosch surrendered to the Drug Enforcement Agency on Tuesday morning as part of the DEA’s “Operation Strikeout.” The news was first reported by ESPN’s TJ Quinn.

Bosch has agreed to plead guilty to conspiracy to distribute anabolic steroids. The charges against Bosch are not limited to providing steroids to professional athletes, as he also allegedly distributed controlled substances to numerous high school-aged athletes.

While Bosch could face up to 10 years in prison, Quinn reports that he surrendered after his attorney struck a deal with the US Attorney’s office. If you remember, part of Bosch’s dealing with Major League Baseball included a guarantee from the league that they would put in a good word with law enforcement officials if Bosch agreed to cooperate. It is unclear what type of role — if any — Bosch’s alleged agreement with MLB played in his decision to surrender.

In addition to Bosch, several other Biogenesis associates were brought into custody on Tuesday morning. Alex Rodrguez’s cousin Yuri Sucart was also arrested on conspiracy charges.

Sucart filed a $5 million defamation lawsuit against A-Rod last year after Rodriguez publicly stated that Sucart pressured him to take steroids several years ago. If the charges against Sucart are upheld, it will be interesting to see if MLB or the New York Yankees can tie him to A-Rod.

Photo: Twitter/TJ Quinn

Could Josh Gordon succeed with second-hand smoke defense?

Josh GordonJosh Gordon is set to appeal his failed drug test on Friday. He is reportedly planning to use the second-hand smoke defense, which is one we have heard from players in the past but rarely holds up during the appeals process. But as Mike Florio of Pro Football Talk outlined on Tuesday, Gordon might actually have a shot.

After he tested positive for the use of codeine syrup and was suspended for the first two games of the 2013 season, Gordon was placed in the NFL’s Stage III drug program. That means he has to pass 10 drug tests per month, and Florio reports that he has passed around 70 of them. And the one time Gordon did test positive, half of his urine tested negative. Florio breaks it down:

Urine samples routinely are split into two bottles, the “A” bottle and the “B” bottle. If the “A” bottle generates a positive result, the “B” bottle is tested. Amazingly, the “B” bottle doesn’t have to independently show a violation. Instead, the substance abuse policy states that the “‘B’ bottle Test need only show that the substance, revealed in the ‘A’ bottle Test, is evident to the ‘limits of detection’ to confirm the results of the ‘A’ bottle Test.”

In English, close counts in horseshoes, hand grenades, and “B” bottles.

For Gordon, the “A” bottle showed a concentration of 16 ng/ml, only one nanogram per milliliter above the limits of 15. The “B” bottle showed a concentration of 13.6 ng/ml — less than the threshold.

In other words, Gordon may have failed his test simply because of the way the sample cups were labeled. Had the arbitrary “A” and “B” labels been swapped, the first urine sample tested would have been negative and he would have passed. Regardless of the way Gordon’s case turns out, that seems like a pretty significant flaw in the NFL’s testing system.

Independent of the A/B dilemma is the fact that one of Gordon’s samples tested just one nanogram per milliliter above the legal limit of 15, whereas the second sample tested 1.4 nanograms per milliliter below. While limits are limits for a reason, does Gordon have a case with the second-hand smoke argument because of how close he was to passing?

For what it’s worth, Gordon recently hired Maurice Suh — the attorney who helped Richard Sherman convince the NFL to nix his four-game suspension after he tested positive in 2012. Gordon is still facing a one-year suspension if he loses his appeal, but I wouldn’t be cutting him from my fantasy keeper league just yet.

Cubs sue fake ‘Billy Cub’ mascot who got in bar fight

As if the Chicago Cubs don’t already have enough to worry about with improving their last-place team, now they have to worry about legal matters with unauthorized mascots.

Billy Cub mascotExactly one year ago we passed along a story about the Cubs sending a cease and desist letter to a man who was parading around Wrigleyville as an unauthorized mascot. The man, John Paul Weier, wears a furry costume and Cubs jersey with the name “Billy Cub” on the back. He recruited others to wear the mascot as well, and they show up around Wrigley Field to take pictures with fans, dance with them, and do other things.

But their behavior hasn’t been that of a typical mascot.

The Cubs allege that the men charge for pictures and ask for tips. They also allegedly have made rude, profane and derogatory remarks to fans and season ticket holders. The “Billy Cub” mascot is not affiliated with the team and therefore making the organization look bad, the team says. And that is why they filed a lawsuit Friday.

According to the Chicago Sun-Times, the Cubs filed a lawsuit against Weier and his mascot friends, saying the men are not affiliated with the organization and that they are violating the team’s trademarks by using the character to mislead people. What’s worse is that the men are accused of trying to profit off the fake mascot character.

The Sun-Times says the suit alleges that “Weier owns or operates websites and social media accounts dedicated to promoting the Billy Cub character, and has sold merchandise related to the character.”

The Cubs are suing for damages, legal fees and all the profits the men have made from the character on grounds of trademark infringement, deceptive trade practice and injury to the Cubs’ reputation.

Surely you laugh at the thought that a fake mascot harming the Cubs’ reputation more than the Cubs have already done by not winning a World Series since 1908 … but a video of the Billy Cub punching a guy at a bar went viral a few months ago, and that’s definitely something the Cubs don’t want to be associated with. Then when you combine them mistreating fans or charging for things, that’s enough to tick off an organization. It’s clear the guy behind the “Billy Cub” is being a real jackass. The Cubs are going to win this suit and should.

Next up I hope the Cubs sue this TV network for making their mascot look even worse!

Head over to Page 2 to see many pictures of Billy Cub posing with fans.

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