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Pranksters who recorded Buddy Nix-Mark Dominik phone call may have committed a felony

You probably have heard that a couple of kids, with a little luck and a lot of chutzpah, were able to merge two separate phone calls involving Buffalo Bills GM Buddy Nix and Tampa Bay Buccaneers GM Mark Dominik. They then recorded the conversation between Nix and Dominik, which was later revealed on Deadspin. Sounds like some pretty complicated and hi-tech stuff right?

Actually, it’s pretty easy to do:

Cell phone merge call

Now, you might be thinking that you could have a lot of fun with this feature alongside a recording device, but beware: there’s a fair possibility that the kids who pulled off this prank could be in a lot of trouble. Why? What they did is illegal in New York and in Florida.

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Alex Rodriguez reportedly being sued by cousin Yuri Sucart for $5 million

alex rodriguezAs if New York Yankees slugger Alex Rodriguez didn’t already have enough on his plate, he is reportedly facing a $5 million lawsuit from his cousin Yuri Sucart. According to the website TheMLBNation.com, the lawsuit is based on libel, defamation of character, fraud and dues owed.

When Rodriguez admitted to using performance-enhancing drugs several years ago, he and Sucart had a falling out after A-Rod publicly accused his cousin of pushing him to use steroids and also injecting him with PEDs on multiple occasions. A-Rod made a peace offering when he bought a diamond-studded ring for Sucart after the Yankees won the World Series in 2009, but Sucart sold it to a collector in South Florida.

Sucart has been banned from the Yankees facilities, team flights and buses. He reportedly proposed a settlement for Rodriguez which was turned down, and the case is now headed for trial seeking $5 million in damages.

Both Rodriguez’s and Sucart’s names have surfaced in the MLB and DEA investigation involving Anthony Bosch’s anti-aging clinic in Coral Gables, Fla. A-Rod has denied his involvement, but authorities are in the process of determining whether Rodriguez, Sucart and several other players and people involved with baseball obtained steroids from Bosch.

Via NY Post

NFL pressured a man to give up his request to trademark ‘Harbowl’

John-Harbaugh-Jim-HarbaughWith the San Francisco 49ers and the Baltimore Ravens set to square off in Super Bowl XLVII, much of the buzz surrounding the game has centered around the brothers Harbaugh competing against each other for the Vince Lombardi trophy. John and Jim Harbaugh both had great teams heading into the season, so it is not shocking that they are the only two coaches left standing.

A man from Indiana named Roy Fox anticipated a potential Niners-Ravens matchp, so he decided to try to make some money off of it. Last February, Fox says he paid more than $1,000 to file trademarks for the phrases “Harbowl” and “Harbaugh Bowl.” However, his plan never came to fruition because of pressure from the NFL.

“Right before the conference championship games last year, I thought to myself, ‘Can you imagine if these guys played each other?’” Fox told ESPN.com. “If Pat Riley would go through the trouble of trademarking three-peat, why shouldn’t I try this?”

In August, the NFL sent a letter to Fox expressing concerns that his recent trademarks could be confused with the league’s trademark of Super Bowl. NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy explained the purpose behind that letter.

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Terrell Suggs reportedly had to surrender several firearms last month

Baltimore Ravens linebacker Terrell Suggs had to surrender several firearms last month as part of a court order related to a domestic dispute, the Baltimore Sun reported on Thursday.

According to the Sun, Suggs and his girlfriend, Candace Williams, are involved in a custody dispute over their two children. The report says Suggs filed a custody complaint on Nov. 19. Williams filed a complaint sometime afterward. A court order led to Suggs surrendering the guns.

“The guns were surrendered over to police pursuant to the court order, and they [Suggs and Williams] are resolving their issues,” Suggs’ attorney told the Sun. “All I can tell you is that he’s in rightful and lawful possession of the guns but turned them over pursuant to the requirements of the law.”

The Baltimore Sun says two 911 calls were received from Suggs’ address on Nov. 21, but that no reports were taken.

The two have a history of domestic problems.

Williams filed a complaint against Suggs in December 2009 alleging domestic violence. The complaint arose in Williams’ application for a protective order. She received the protective order but rescinded it and a $70 million lawsuit a month later as the two attempted to reconcile.

Suggs’ attorney told the Sun that all domestic issues should be resolved at a court hearing next week.

Alabama teabagger Brian Downing gets two years in prison

Brian Downing, the Alabama fan who pleaded guilty to teabagging a passed out LSU fan following the BCS National Championship Game earlier this year, was sentenced to two years in prison, NOLA.com reported on Thursday.

We mentioned last month that Downing had entered a guilty plea to lesser charges and that he was facing two years in prison, but it’s still pretty shocking to see that sentence. The guy did something lewd and crude, but who would figure that a nasty college prank that didn’t physically endanger another person would result in a two-year prison sentence?

NOLA.com has a poll on its site asking readers to vote whether or not they felt justice was served. As of this writing, 2,613 votes had been cast. 51.5% felt justice was served, 36.6% said no, and about 11% felt undecided or “other.”

I understand this was an embarrassing experience for the victim, and that what Downing did was pretty gross, and done in public, which is pretty nasty, but two years just seems quite excessive to me. I guess when you’re facing 10 years in prison and being forced to register as a sex offender, this is a better alternative. His lawyer says he could be out in nine months, which seems much more reasonable.

Andrew Bynum sued by neighbors, accused of using drugs, brandishing guns, blasting music

Andrew Bynum is involved in a lawsuit with his former California neighbors that features plenty of mudslinging from both sides, TMZ reports.

According to Thirty Mile Zone, the current Philadelphia 76ers center filed a lawsuit in L.A. Superior Court accusing his former neighbors, the Becketts, of being violent and racist. His lawsuit reportedly claims the Becketts have objected to his “profession, his race, his friends, his cars and his taste in music.”

Bynum accuses them of throwing coins at his car, screaming at him about his music, and even banging a stick at the side of his house.

The Becketts, who lived next door to Bynum in Westchester, Calif., believe that Bynum only filed the suit as a preemptive strike once he learned they were planning a lawsuit. They fired back with a countersuit, in which they allege the following misdeeds by Bynum:

    - brandishing firearms in an attempt to intimidate the Becketts
    - “apparently” using drugs and allowing weed smoke to drift next door
    - blasting loud, profane rap music (including the song “Currency” by Trina)
    - blasting his video games at “window-shaking volumes”
    - letting his dogs run loose through the neighborhood
    - constantly racing his luxury cars at dangerous speeds

Not ones to jump to conclusions before seeing all the facts of a story, we here at LBS are going to lean towards believing the neighbors.

I mean who would actually doubt the credibility of a 25-year-old NBA player who has demonstrated impeccable judgment in the past by:

- Rehabbing a knee injury at the Playboy Mansion
- Attending the World Cup which delayed his rehab from a knee injury
- Disregarding handicap parking spots
- Blowing off a meeting with the Lakers’ front office

Who would believe that the same guy Kobe Bryant described as having a “f— it” attitude would display the same sort of blatant disregard for his neighbors? Not me. Not at all. We don’t jump to those sorts of conclusions here at LBS. We deal in pure facts, not speculation based on a person’s overwhelming history.

NFL reportedly paid $2 million in disability to former players, despite denying link between football and brain damage

A joint investigation conducted by ESPN’s “Outside the Lines” and PBS’ “Frontline” show could shed new light onto the issues surrounding the long-term effects of concussions players suffer while playing in the NFL. Despite the fact that the NFL has consistently denied any link between playing in the NFL and long-term brain damage, unpublished documents and medical records revealed that the league paid at least $2 million in disability benefits to players in the late 1990s and early 2000s.

According to the investigation, the disability board determined in 1999 that Hall of Fame center Mike Webster and other players suffered brain damage while playing. Awarding players compensation for head injuries completely contradicts the public stance the NFL has taken regarding concussions.

Bob Fitzsimmons, a lawyer who represented Webster in 1999 and co-director of the Brain Injury Research center, said the settlements could create major issues for the NFL.

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