Quantcast

Does Doug Marrone have cancer? Bills website deletes story

Doug Marrone cancer story

Does Buffalo Bills head coach Doug Marrone have cancer? That’s what many are left wondering after the Bills’ website posted a story making the announcement before deleting it.

The Bills’ website posted the headline and what appeared to be the shell for an upcoming story announcing that Marrone has cancer.

“Head Coach Doug Marrone announced today that he was diagnosed with BLANK TYPE OF CANCER and that it is highly treatable,” said the first line of the story.

“Head Coach Doug Marrone shared the news today that he’s been diagnosed with BLANK cancer. He says it’s ‘not aggrive’ and highly treatable,” the story also read.

You could tell the story wasn’t ready to be published yet because they also included this line:

“QUOTE FROM MARRONE.”

The story appeared on the stream on the Bills’ website:

It also made the app:

The Buffalo News says the story was on the site for 9 hours before being pulled by the Bills with no explanation.

So there’s no mistake about it, this is how it looked on the site:

Unless this is some sort of hoax, it looks like a story was mistakenly published by the site. We hope Marrone is fine and will hope for the best for him.

UPDATE – WKBW sports director Jeff Russo reports that Marrone had a cancerous mole found on his skin that was removed.

Via Deadspin

Darren Rovell makes fun of fat person sitting courtside at Bulls game, apologizes

Darren-RovellEveryone is guilty of using poor judgment on Twitter and Facebook from time to time, but we don’t all have nearly 500,000 followers. When you do, your mistakes are magnified. ESPN’s Darren Rovell learned that when he sent a tweet over the weekend that some people probably found to be hilarious.

Rovell spotted a rather large fan sitting courtside during Game 1 of the Chicago Bulls’ opening round playoff series against the Washington Wizards. He tweeted a photo of the guy and made a joke about him having to purchase two seats.

Rovell quickly deleted the tweet and issued an apology.

Some people are proud to be morbidly obese. Remember that fat ass Philadelphia 76ers fan who jiggled his rolls to distract Kevin Garnett? It’s OK to make fun of people like that, but for all we know the guy at the Bulls game may have had a health condition he can’t control.

Nancy Grace being blackballed by WWE over Ultimate Warrior coverage

Nancy GraceTV host Nancy Grace is being blackballed by the WWE over the way she covered The Ultimate Warrior’s death, according to a report.

TMZ says past and present WWE wrestlers are being warned not to appear on Grace’s HLN show after she had Diamond Dallas Page on her program last week and strongly insinuated Warrior’s death was rooted in steroid and drug abuse.

We reported on Grace’s coverage of Warrior’s death and pointed out that she had a scroll of wrestlers who had died young and included Owen Hart on the list, even though Hart’s death was a total fluke due to a complete malfunction during an event rather than steroids or drugs.

Grace’s coverage was enough to upset the company to the point that they don’t want anyone appearing on her program in the future.

The way the program covered the death was simply irresponsible and unprofessional.

Hawk Harrelson gets stereotypical, says Chen-Chang Lee has ‘typical Asian motion’

Hawk HarrelsonChicago White Sox broadcaster Hawk Harrelson is best known for being a huge homer and not for delivering play-by-play with the type of tact that legends like Vin Scully display. So it’s probably not too surprising to hear the poor phrasing he used when talking about Cleveland Indians pitcher Chen-Chang Lee.

Lee is a relief pitcher from Taiwan who threw 4.1 innings last season in the bigs. He made his season debut on Thursday and pitched 1.1 innings of scoreless relief against the Sox. While he was facing his second batter of the inning, the White Sox announcing team seemed intrigued by his sidearm delivery and sweeping finish.

“It’s a nasty slider from down under,” Steve Stone said about a slider Alexei Ramirez took for a strike.

“Yeah that’s a typical Asian motion,” said Hawk. “Deception involved.”

Yeesh.

Yes, many Asian pitchers have different motions from North American pitchers. They most likely have different instruction in Japan and other Asian countries compared to North America, which is also why many Asian hitters have different stances, swings and finishes from what we’re used to seeing. Hideo Nomo had his tornado thing, Dice K Matsuzaka had a hesitation, and Hiroki Kuroda has a hitch in his leg kick, just to give a few examples.

But is Lee’s motion a “typical Asian motion”? If so, what is a typical Asian motion, Hawk?

If Hawk wanted to point out that many Asian pitchers have something with their delivery that is different from what we are used to seeing, that would be fine. If he wanted to say Lee has a tough ball to pick up because it’s sidearm, that’s fine. But what about this was typical Asian deception? The way he phrased and worded things was just plain bad.

Via Deadspin

Deion Sanders says Johnny Manziel has ‘ghetto tendencies’ then denies it

Deion SandersDeion Sanders is a fan of Johnny Manziel because he likes the former Heisman Trophy winner’s flashy ways on the field. In fact, Primetime says Manziel’s behavior reminds him of the way he used to act, and that’s a big reason why Prime is a fan. But Deion had a little bit of a problem on Wednesday when he denied saying people will have a hard time accepting Manziel because the ex-A&M QB has “ghetto tendencies,” even though the comment was caught on audio.

Sanders was a guest on “Roland Martin Reports” and spent most of the interview defending DeSean Jackson. At the end of the interview, he was asked about Manziel.

Below is a transcription of what Deion said via the Roland Martin website:

SYBIL WILKES: So before you go, Deion, what do you think about all of this talk about Roland’s boy, Johnny Football, Johnny Manzel in all of the conversation about him?

DEION SANDERS: Oh, please. I love Johnny Football. See, the reason people won’t accept Johnny Football is because Johnny Football has ghetto tendencies. I love Johnny Football.

TOM JOYNER: He’s got ghetto tendencies?

ROLAND MARTIN: He’s got ghetto tendencies? What are ghetto tendencies, Prime Time?

DEION SANDERS: Because he was successful, he made it, and he let you all know he made it, and he was cocky, he was flamboyant, and he let you know.

ROLAND MARTIN: So he was a white Prime Time coming out of college.

DEION SANDERS: Thank you. And I love him. (Laughter) I love him. They had the music playing when he came in. Put his whole equipment up, who go out there all do your pro day with all your equipment on? (Laughter) That’s some hula stuff, I love Johnny Football.

They even posted the audio on their website (skip to the 6:27 mark to hear it):

Sanders’ point was understandable, but the phrasing “ghetto tendencies” is more than questionable.

Now here’s where the fun begins. Our friend Rob Littal at Black Sports Online says someone from Roland’s program sent him the audio clip along with the headline that Manziel has “ghetto tendencies” in an effort to receive more coverage and publicity for the story. One of Rob’s writers, Vashti Hurt, posted the story on their site, and Rob tweeted out the link. Someone showed the link to Sanders, who flipped out and denied saying what he said:

Unfortunately for Deion, the Roland program posted the audio clip on their site and transcribed all the comments, so everyone could hear and see exactly what Deion said. And there’s no denying that Deion said Manziel had “ghetto tendencies.”

Deion never apologized for denying making those comments, but that’s not too surprising. Would you expect him to admit where he was wrong?

Dan Shaughnessy calls second game ‘must win’ for Red Sox

Dan-ShaughnessyDan Shaughnessy is the resident pessimist of the city of Boston. The longtime Boston Globe writer has made a career out of overreacting and annoying Boston Red Sox fans by counting the team out before it’s over. After the Sox lost to the Baltimore Orioles on Opening Day, Shaughnessy was up to his old tricks.

In his Globe column on Tuesday morning, Shaughnessy wrote about how the Red Sox were “lacking championship intangibles” and failed to do all the “small things” that helped them win the World Series last season. He finished up the discussion with this gem:

Those were the things they did not do on Monday. Luckily, the Red Sox do not play in a town that’s likely to overreact to a loss on Opening Day.

Wednesday night, however, just became a Must Win for the Olde Town Team.

There is obviously some sarcasm in there. Boston fans overreact to just about everything, so Shaughnessy was being facetious with his claim that the Red Sox don’t play in a town that will overreact to a loss on Opening Day. We can only hope calling game two of a 162-game season a “must win” was also a sarcastic remark.

Even if it was, the column was written with a “sky is falling” tone. Red Sox fans may overreact, but no one is panicking after the first game of the season. In fact, no one will panic if the Orioles sweep John Farrell’s club. If Shaughnessy’s point was that the fans consider game two a must win, he’s still wrong.

Then again, the only time Shaughnessy expressed optimism for the Red Sox was in 2011, when their season ended in disaster. The team is at it’s best when Shaughnessy is at his worst.

H/T Hardball Talk

Tim Cowlishaw takes shot at Kentucky as a school

Tim-Cowlishaw-Backtracking-For-Tweet-About-Darrelle-Revis-and-JetsOne of the most interesting stories of the week has to be the deal that fell through between Steve Masiello and the University of Southern Florida. USF announced that Masiello would be the school’s next basketball coach on Tuesday before pulling the offer because of some information that was uncovered during a background check. It turns out Masiello lied on his resume.

Various sources reported on Wednesday that Masiello never actually graduated from the University of Kentucky, where he played four seasons as a walk-on from 1996-2000. Tim Cowlishaw doesn’t think that should matter.

“What’s the difference between having a degree from Kentucky and almost having a degree from Kentucky?” Cowlishaw quipped on Wednesday’s edition of Around the Horn. “Are either of those things really relevant?”

Cowlishaw was obviously looking to ruffle feathers, and he accomplished his goal. Tony Reali and the rest of the panel instantly began discussing the possible ramifications of Cowlishaw’s comments, which included a healthy bashing from our friends at Kentucky Sports Radio.

You know Cowlishaw is enjoying every second of it.