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Joe Morgan Corrects Himself on Sunday Night Baseball (Audio)

I noted recently that Joe Morgan was caught making a mistake (also known as a lie) while telling a story on Sunday Night Baseball. He said that he helped the Phillies continue their notable 10 game losing streak with an RBI single in his major league debut back in 1964. Problem was, Morgan made his debut in 1963, and he never even had an RBI in 1964. So Joe was wrong on both accounts, trying to place himself into a situation that he clearly was not a part of.

Well, Phil Musnick in the NY Post noted that Morgan was expected to make a correction on his next broadcast of Sunday Night Baseball. That night came, and Joe acknowledged his mistake. Kind of. Jon Miller had to lead Joe through the entire event, with Morgan just giving one-word answers the entire time. You could really tell how much Morgan hated doing it. Listen to the audio right here (mp3).

Joe Morgan on LBS:
Joe Morgan Audio Apology
Joe Morgan is Officially Full of Crap

Joe Morgan Is Officially Full of Crap

Joe MorganIf there’s anything that could possibly make Jon Miller sound bad, it’s Joe Morgan. The guy is just horrible. He rambles on about every single little detail in a telecast and never lets go. And he makes a manager picking his nose sound like it’s a complicated baseball matter — some sort of sign being given out. Anyways, Awful Announcing points out the latest on Joe Morgan, a column from Phil Mushnick exposing the fraud that is Joe Morgan:

Cardinals-Phillies was part of ESPN’s pathetic “Sunday Night Baseball” coverage. The Phillies were about to become the first Major League Baseball team to 10,000 losses. And Joe Morgan, ESPN’s No. 1 baseball analyst, a fellow whose wisdom is often laced with convoluted, confounding and contradictory nonsense, was moved to tell a national audience about the significant role he played in Phillies history.

The year, Morgan told us, was 1964, that calamitous season when the Phillies blew a 61/2-game lead with 12 games left by losing 10 straight. Morgan said he made his major-league debut late in ’64, against the Phillies. And it was in that game that his RBI single beat the Phillies, extending their infamous losing streak to eight or nine.

Morgan added that Phillies manager Gene Mauch was so upset he threw over the buffet table in the clubhouse, hollering that his club had just been beaten by “a Little Leaguer!”

Great story. But unless Morgan was confusing himself with Reds rookie infielder Chico Ruiz, it never happened. As several readers were moved to write, the Phillies played the Reds, Braves and Cardinals during that losing streak; Houston wasn’t in the mix.

Furthermore, Morgan, though called up in 1964, did not have an RBI that season for Houston.

And he did not make his big-league debut in ’64, either. That came Sept. 21, 1963, when he went 0-for-1, pinch-hitting against the Phillies.

Al Martin and George O’Leary think that’s far-fetched. Now, if only ESPN could clean up Sunday Night Baseball and get a real analyst in the booth — you know, like Harold Reynolds — then all would be well in this world. Until then, we must suffer through the obvious crap this guy spews on a weekly basis. The horror.

Skip Bayless is officially an idiot; not impressed by a 1-hitter

OK, it’s official. We knew that Skip Bayless liked to argue, and that he has his way of dissuading people and diminishing all accomplishments. But Friday morning he took it to an all new low. The topic of Curt Schilling’s one-hitter against the A’s came up. There are several parts of the game that stood out to me. First, Schilling came within two outs of a no-hitter — that’s not easy to do. Second, he did all this in a 1-0 game, when all it took was a walk followed by a home run for him to become the loser. Third, the Red Sox had lost four in a row, and were on the verge of being swept when he broke out with the gem. But unfortunately for Skip, Mr. Bayless was “not especially impressed.”

Varitek his catcher said he didn’t have his best stuff in the bullpen. Coco Crisp makes a terrific over over-the-shoulder catch in center. Mike Lowell makes a terrific play at third base. And there was a lot of luck involved because a lot of balls were hit sharply but at them. Remember he struck out only four batters. In his one-hitter against Milwaukee, he struck out 17 — that is no-hit stuff.

Come on Skip, how can you possibly nit-pick this performance? Seriously. Sorry not all contests can be perfect games. Then again, Skip would find a way to be unimpressed by one of those.

Magic Letting Donovan Off the Hook

According to a report from the Orlando Sentinel as of early Monday morning.

The Orlando Magic today will allow Billy Donovan out of his 5-year, $27.5 million contract that he signed on Friday.

“It’s over,” said a source close to the situation.

Unless Donovan wakes up today and changes his mind, the Magic will let him go, the source said.

Yeah, they’ll let him go it says. But what the report does not mention is whether or not there will be any financial retribution owed by Donovan. The confusion comes in depending on which report you believe. According to Andy Katz of ESPN, Donovan actually signed the deal on Friday for $27.5 million over 5 years. Jeff Goodman of foxsports.com cites an AP report that the contract was only agreed upon, not signed. If you go with Goodman’s report, it will be much easier for Donovan to head back to Florida. If you go by Katz’s report, he’ll have to come to a financial agreement in order to leave Orlando.

Here’s where I stand. If you’re the Magic, you’re certainly pissed, but you have to let the guy go. You can’t force a man to stay and coach if he does not want to be there. However, you did sell over 200 season tickets the day he was signed, and you were also delayed by a week or so in your search for a new coach based on the belief that you had found your man. So Donovan definitely owes the Magic an inconvenience fee. Luckily Orlando has plenty of time to make their next move (which appears to be Stan Van Jeremy Gundy). Heck, if divorcees get compensated for marriages that last only a day, then so should basketball teams.

She’s a Hooker and a Stripper, Not a Dancer

This is really something I’ve stewed over for the past year or so, dating back to the time when the Duke lacrosse story was being reported on a regular basis. And to this day, when reference is made to the Duke lacrosse team, most notably on Monday when they lost in the national championship game to Johns Hopkins, their rape case is synonymously noted. But one thing about every mention bothers me. Sports anchors and sports writers insist on referring to the woman in question, who clearly made up most of her allegations, as an “exotic dancer.”

Bullshit. Can we just quit those references from here on out? Let’s just call her what she really is — a hooker and a fucking stripper. Welcome to reality. The woman’s a whore. Literally. So why does everyone have to try and be PC about it, calling her an “exotic dancer?” That my friends, is twisting the truth. Because unless she’s nailing double-headed dildos, there’s nothing exotic about what she does. She’s a hooker and a stripper, got it? Thanks.

Gary Bettman Explains the Switch from NBC to Versus

The commish joined Mike and the Mad Dog as a guest on WFAN on Monday and took quite the beating. The hosts were peppering him with questions — namely, why was the plug pulled on the Senators/Sabres game that went to overtime? Well, turns out that regardless of what the wrath and scorn of the media would lead you to believe, the plug was not pulled. In fact, Bettman knew quite well that the coverage of the game on NBC would be lost if it went to overtime.

It wasn’t something that just happened on Saturday. It was something that we knew could happen and it was something that we all planned for.

When we made our deal with NBC they had a pre-existing contractual relationship with the Preakness. Covering the Preakness is more than covering the two-minute race. There are a whole host of sponsors and advertisers who buy the time that leads up to the Preakness. NBC had an obligation to carry it.

We were getting this game to the widest coverage for the longest period of time. If we didn’t do this game on NBC even with the possibility that the game was going to be switched over for overtime, then the entire game would’ve been on Versus.

So there you go — justification from Bettman. And I think he’s just in a crappy position all-the-way around. It’s lose-lose. If they televise it on Versus, nobody sees it, and everyone laughs that a NHL Conference Finals game is on a channel nobody gets. They took a gamble hoping for the best, and they got burned. The only other plausible suggestion would have been to start the game earlier. That’s something Bettman really didn’t explain well. He tried to attribute it to re-seeding from round-to-round, and the uncertainty that the game could be on the West Coast. Lame. That would have been the best solution in my eyes.

Jose Vidro Ruined Ichiro’s Stolen Base Streak

I guess this is kind of a streak that went under the radar, but I thought it was pretty cool. Dating back to last season, Ichiro had stolen 45 straight bases without being caught. That’s pretty impressive when you think about it. He was only 5 away from tying Vince Coleman’s record, that is, until he got thrown out on Thursday night. Jose Vidro was up with nobody out and Ichiro on first in the bottom of the 7th and the Mariners trailing 6-3. Then, in what was an obvious hit-and-run play, Jose Vidro botched the sign, failed to swing, and left Ichiro hanging out to dry. Just check out Vidro’s reaction — he completely drops his head in disgust, fully knowing that he screwed up. And Ichiro isn’t even in the picture when the ball arrives at second base. It’s very clear that it was a botched hit-and-run:

Not surprisingly, the Angels announcers completely missed it. Rex Hudler was going on and on about how good Jose Molina is behind the plate, how tough it is to run on him and Colon. Well, that might be the case in general, but it wasn’t at all the case Thursday night. They played the replay again in the 9th, and Hudler went off again, “out by a mile.” Man Rex, you played the game, you’re supposed to be the analyst. Aren’t these plays just the sort of thing you’re supposed to recognize?

UPDATE: It’s been confirmed by the Seattle Times that it was a busted hit-and-run play