Quantcast

Alistair Overeem fails drug test, UFC 146 fight in jeopardy

Alistair Overeem’s scheduled fight with Junior dos Santos at UFC 146 in Las Vegas is in jeopardy after the MMA star failed a drug test due to elevated levels of testosterone. The Nevada State Athletic Commission says Overeem’s T/E ratio was greater than 10:1, which is higher than their 6:1 limit. Overeem will have to appear in front of the commission.

Overeem had similar issues prior to his UFC 141 fight with Brock Lesnar. He initially did not provide a sample before the fight, then he did, and it was the wrong sample. The NSAC granted him a conditional license and he faced drug testing after the fight, which he passed. This time he wasn’t as lucky and he failed a random test.

There is some irony in this situation. Junior dos Santos implied in an interview last year that both Overeem and Lesnar used steroids. Now, leading up to a fight against dos Santos, he’s been popped for likely PED usage.

This news should not surprise anyone. Suspicions of Overeem’s PED usage should have been high after the whole fiasco prior to the Lesnar fight. Plus, just one look at these pictures tells you all you need to know.

Credit: Mark J. Rebilas-US PRESSWIRE

George Brett says Hall of Famers would boycott Hall of Fame if steroid user gets in

To date, there are no Hall of Famers among the ever-increasing list of known steroid users who currently play or once played in the MLB. Some of the game’s biggest names like Alex Rodriguez and Mark McGwire have admitted they used performance-enhancing drugs, while others like Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens continue to fight to prove their innocence. As we know, voters have not come close to letting McGwire in the Hall of Fame because of it. What will happen with the others when their time comes remains to be seen, but Hall of Famer George Brett says voters would be wise to steer clear of anyone whose name is tied to PEDs.

“I wasn’t a home-run hitter,” Brett said according to the Arizona Republic, “but I know from talking to guys in the 500-home run club, guys like Schmitty (Mike Schmidt) and some other guys like that, if those guys make it in then they’ll never go back. Meaning those guys will never go back and attend (the Hall of Fame inductions) if the cheaters get elected.”

If you ask Jose Canseco, there’s just one minor problem with Brett’s theory: A steroid user is already in the Hall of Fame. Canseco, who has a solid reputation for telling the truth when it comes to PED usage, said more than two years ago that Major League Baseball is going to have a big problem on its hands when they find out that a current Hall of Famer used steroids. At the time we speculated that it could be Rickey Henderson or a few other former teammates of Canseco’s, and anyone would be extremely naive to think that it’s not possible or likely.

Brett also said that A-Rod should not get into the Hall of Fame just because he came clean and that he should have gone about it like Jason Giambi and Andy Pettite did. As Craig Calcaterra of Hardball Talk mentioned, how was Rodriguez’s confession any different? Either you’re willing to make amends for guys who admitted it or you’re not.

If you believe both Brett and Canseco, the Hall of Fame could be facing a major dilemma at some point in the near future.

Rampage Jackson reportedly says UFC doctor recommended he get testosterone therapy for fight

Rampage Jackson says he was injured leading up to his UFC 144 fight against Ryan Bader and that he nearly pulled out because of all his medical problems. However, he says he saw a UFC doctor who recommended he get testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) to heal so he could keep the fight date. Rampage says he followed the instructions, took the TRT, and that it made him feel great.

“I never had surgery in my life. But I hurt this knee back in college, I hurt it before I fought Rashad and so I knew it was the same injury… a lot of fights when I am injured I don’t tell anybody but the UFC knew this time because my doctor works for the UFC,” Rampage told Fighter’s Only magazine. “It’s good that the UFC knew because they look after you, they take care of you even if its just in training. Pride didn’t do that.

“I almost pulled out but then I went to see the doctor and he told me to talk to an age-management doctor. So I went and talked to them and they tested me and said my testosterone was low; they prescribed me testosterone, to bring my testosterone levels back up to levels where I can be like … so that I am the same as young people, like when I was 25, and it would help build my knee up,” he said. “I hurt my knee like a month ago and I only did three shots of testosterone but it put a lot of weight on me, a lot of muscle on me but it healed me knee up good enough to where I could fight.

“It was hard for me to train, it takes time to heal, I couldn’t do certain things, but this was my first time ever using testosterone. I took what the doctor prescribed to me and I went to the pharmacy… I gave myself small doses and that **** immediately changed me, that’s why I am saying now I am not going to retire. I am not gonna retire no time soon, it’s just unfortunate that I got this injury.”

Based on those comments, you can clearly see how beneficial TRT can be to fighters. Now there’s another serious concern beyond a UFC doctor recommending a fighter get testosterone replacement therapy — Rampage says the UFC told him several fighters are probably using TRT but just keep it quiet.

[Read more...]

Ryan Braun urine collector insists he did not tamper with sample

Ryan Braun had his time to address the arbitration case he won against MLB which overturned the 50 game suspension he was due for a positive drug test. Braun criticized MLB’s testing process that resulted in the overturned suspension. The Brewers MVP reportedly won his case because the urine collector kept the sample at home for two days, believing there wasn’t a FedEx open to ship the sample.

The urine collector, Dino Laurenzi Jr., issued a statement Tuesday defending his work and decisions. He says storing the samples at home was not unusual, and it was something he was taught to do. If you believe Laurenzi, then it’s difficult to explain how Braun’s sample had extremely high levels of synthetic testosterone. Braun may have escaped suspension, but the questions about his positive test still have not been answered.

Below is Laurenzi’s entire statement:

[Read more...]

Victor Conte not buying Ryan Braun’s story

Whether or not you believe Ryan Braun’s bold declaration of innocence Friday is up to you. But if you’re one of the nearly 4,000 followers of BALCO founder Victor Conte on Twitter, you’ll know he isn’t buying it. Since an arbitrator on Thursday overturned the reigning NL MVP’s 50-game suspension, Conte hasn’t stopped tweeting his doubt over Braun’s innocence.

Here are a few highlights:

“My opinion. Braun used testosterone. Urine & result are valid. Source claim ‘insanely high.’ Untrue. Only 20 to1 T/E ratio. Others 80 to 1″

“Dopey users and dopey testers. Two failed IQ tests”

“My Opinion. Braun’s people are blowing smoke. Both A & B sample positive w/ CIR (carbon isotope ratio) confirmation. MLB ‘flawed’ technical policy will change soon”

“My opinion. Floyd Landis case like Braun case. A & B samples w/ elevated T/E ratio. CIR confirms “synthetic” testosterone. Lots of smoke”

“The WADA (World Anti-Doping Association) Director said the integrity of Braun’s urine sample had NOT been compromised and WADA would have found him positive. An MLB bad.”

“My opinion. Braun’s positive drug test for testosterone was not overturned. Simply a procedure error was made by MLB. Braun tested positive”

Conte was sentenced to four months in prison for his role with BALCO, so it’s hard to take him seriously when he’s trying to be the moral police, as he is here. Especially so with that last tweet, which, as Eye on Baseball points out, isn’t even an opinion; it’s fact.

Truth is, we might not ever know for certain whether Braun actually cheated, given his appeal was focused on the testing process rather than the actual result. Conte’s tweets are another reminder that Braun winning the arbitration hearing does not mean he never used performance-enhancing drugs. The question is: Do you believe Braun used and just happened to get off, and do you value the analysis of an ex-con like Conte?

Ryan Braun reportedly won appeal because sample was delivered to lab two days late

Although Brewers slugger Ryan Braun will not be suspended for a positive drug test, winning the arbitration case does not necessarily mean he’s innocent. From what we know, the positive drug test for elevated levels of testosterone may have been legitimate. Braun may have only won the appeal because his lawyer cast enough doubt about the test to the three-person arbitration panel.

Several media sources are reporting that Braun won the arbitration case thanks to a technicality.

Tom Haudricourt wrote that Braun won the appeal not because they contested the positive test, but because of the testing process.

Karl Ravech explained the issue in greater detail, saying a source told him “the courier who was supposed to deliver a positive sample to a Federal Express building on a Saturday evening decided not to because he thought that building might be closed. He takes it home with him until Monday morning, leaves it intact, brings it back to the Federal Express building, sends it off, but those 36-48 hours is the loophole that allowed Braun to get off.”

Reporter Jon Heyman said the same thing, reporting that “part of braun’s argument was that the chain of custody was broken for 2 days, meaning the sample was left unprotected.”

Tim Kurkjian reported on ESPN that he heard there was a mishandling of the sample.

So how innocent is Braun? Maybe not as innocent as his statement would like you to believe. Braun winning the arbitration hearing on a technicality seems like the reason MLB was so upset the test was overturned.

Braun may have won his appeal, but it will be hard to win back the people who now view him as a dirty player. This is the exact reason Aaron Rodgers said there should be some confidentiality; the public was not supposed to know about the positive test or appeal.

Ryan Braun wins appeal, will not be suspended for positive drug test

Reigning NL MVP Ryan Braun has beaten the system. The Brewers outfielder will not be suspended 50 games by Major League Baseball for a positive drug test, according to Tom Haudricourt of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

Haudricourt writes “Someone familiar with the decision said the appeal went Braun’s way not so much on contesting the result of the test but the testing process itself, some kind of technicality.”

Braun reportedly tested positive for elevated levels of synthetic testosterone during the playoffs. He accepted his MVP award and the MLB writers had no plans to re-vote on the award.

Braun is expected to report to spring training on Friday. He was the first of 13 players to successfully appeal a drug suspension case.

Major League Baseball Executive Vice President for Labor Relations Rob Manfred issued the following statement expressing dissatisfaction with the outcome of the appeal:

[Read more...]