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Terrelle Pryor Tattoo and Loaner Car Investigations Loom Over Sugar Bowl

The NCAA cemented its status as a shameful organization with its recent handling of Ohio State. The Buckeyes had a handful of players investigated for accepting improper benefits in the form of tattoos they received in exchange for autographs and other memorabilia. Tattoos are expensive and often cost hundreds, if not thousands of dollars, making it a wonder how so many of the Buckeyes could afford all the ink. Then it was revealed that several players sold Big Ten Championship Rings and other memorabilia, a similar charge that resulted in a four-game suspension this season for Georgia wide receiver A.J. Green.

And what happened to the Ohio State players Terrelle Pryor, Dan Herron, Devier Posey, Mike Adams, and Solomon Thomas? They were suspended the first five games of next season, and not at all for those who elect to enter the NFL draft. Somehow the players were allowed to play in the Sugar Bowl under the grounds of the school not educating the players properly on the rules. Right, as if they didn’t know pawning off their goods was illegal.

The latest investigation into impropriety within the Ohio State program received less publicity, likely because it was released around the holidays. As I learned via The Wiz of Odds, the Columbus Dispatch reported that Pryor was ticketed for speeding twice, and another infraction between October, 2008 and March, 2010. Now here’s the kicker: each time he was driving a car owned by a car salesman or registered to a used car lot.

Pryor says the cars were loaners while his was in the shop getting fixed. Right, and Antonio Cromartie used a condom every time except for when he got his girl pregnant. Who actually believes this story? What’s the more likely situation: Pryor only gets stopped for moving violations when he’s in loaner cars, or he’s always driving loaner cars because he’s a badass football player at Ohio State, and he sometimes gets stopped. If you chose option a, you need to have your head examined. Clearly so does the NCAA.


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  • Anonymous

    the NCAA picks and chooses which rules they wish to enforce, when, and against who. I went to a Mac school which is not good
    at bball or fball. One day on campus I saw two of our bball players pulling up in brand new matching explorers with personalized plates.
    It happens everywhere.
    It’s enforced rarely.
    You could have a ton of evidence and the NCAA does nothing, or vague allegations and the NCAA goes apeshat.

  • Anonymous

    IF THE STORY WAS PRINTED THE CORRECT WAY YOU WOULD NOT BE DISCUSSING THIS.THE SALESMAN HAS BEEN SELLING THE OHIO STATE PLAYERS AND FAMILIES FOR MANY YEARS TO THE AMOUNT OF OVER 75 TO 80 PLAYERS.THAT WAS NOT PRINTED IN THE PAPER.HE ALSO HANDLES PRO ATHLETES AS WELL AS EVERYDAY WORKING CLASS PEOPLE.HE PROVIDES A SERVICE TO THE PLAYERS WHICH IS LOOKED AT BY THE COMPLIANCE DEPARTMENT AT THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY ON EVERY AUTOMOBILE SALE OR SERVICE ISSUE.IF YOU HAVE THE FACTS REPORT THEM THE CORRECT WAY.

  • Anonymous

    The reporter failed to report that the salesman has been selling THE OHIO STATE PLAYERS and families for years.He has to report all service as well as auto sales to compliance department after all sales are done for review. Well before Mr Pryor hit campus the salesman had already sold 70 or 80 players and families cars.Report the truth its less shocking.