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Colin Cowherd insinuates that David Ortiz is using steroids

David-Ortiz-Against-One-Game-PlayoffWhat David Ortiz has accomplished through the first five games of the 2013 World Series is nothing shy of incredible. The 37-year-old slugger has carried the Boston Red Sox to a 3-2 series lead over the St. Louis Cardinals by going 11-for-15 from the plate (a .733 average), belting two homers and driving in six runs. He has reached base 15 out of 20 times he has strolled to the plate.

The Cardinals have not been able to get Big Papi out, and ESPN’s Colin Cowherd thinks he knows why. During the opening segment of his show on Wednesday, Cowherd basically said he believes Ortiz is currently using performance-enhancing drugs.

“David Ortiz, who was shot two years ago, is now Babe Ruth,” Cowherd said. “That’s a great story. And I don’t want to get in the way of that great story because it will make people really, really mad. … Last time I saw a guy like this it was Barry Bonds. But sports is about storytelling and hero worship and cool nicknames and fanaticism. Fans get mad when you derail that.”

[Related: Jon Lester defends David Ortiz against Colin Cowherd]

Ortiz’s power numbers have remained relatively consistent throughout his career with the Red Sox, but his .309 average this season was tied for the second-highest of his career for any season in which he appeared in at least 100 games. A historically slow starter, Ortiz came out of the gate red hot in 2013. In fact, a local sports writer insinuated back in May that Papi must be juicing.

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Jack Clark challenges Albert Pujols to take lie detector test about steroids

Albert-Pujols-Angels-slumpFormer St. Louis Cardinals slugger Albert Pujols filed a lawsuit against Jack Clark earlier this month in response to Clark’s steroids allegations.

Clark, a four-time MLB All-Star and former Los Angeles Dodgers hitting coach, recently accused Pujols of using steroids. Pujols vowed to take legal action against Clark in response. Clark, who was fired from his radio gig with WGNU after making the comments about Pujols, does not seem overly concerned about the lawsuit.

On Monday, Clark’s attorney sent a letter to Pujols’ legal team proposing the two sides settle the lawsuit by submitting to a lie detector test. The letter, which was obtained by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, suggested that Pujols allow a lie detector test administrator to ask him if “he is being deceptive when he asserts that he has never used steroids or performing enhancing drugs while in the minor and major leagues.” In return, Clark would be asked if he was lying about former personal trainer Chris Mihlfeld telling him Pujols “juiced.”

The letter proposed that the dispute be settled depending on what happens with the polygraph tests. Basically, Clark is hoping they can take the lie detector tests and then the person who needs to apologize will apologize and be done with it.

Obviously, this resolution would be best for Clark. Pujols has more money than he knows what do with, so he doesn’t even need to take legal fees into consideration. Clark could be telling the truth about Mihlfeld claiming Pujols took steroids, but he’s the one that decided to share it with the world on his radio show. Don’t expect Pujols to agree to take a polygraph test. That would be way too big of a risk.

Eric Byrnes: Hall of Fame player from ’70s and ’80s used steroids

Eric ByrnesFormer MLB outfielder Eric Byrnes decried steroid use and lobbied for harsher penalties for drug cheaters in an essay written on his website. He also says a prominent Hall of Fame baseball player from the 1970s and ’80s used steroids.

Byrnes, who played in the bigs from 2000-2010, wrote the following on his site:

Disturbingly, not long ago I was having dinner with a former long time Major League player that spoke about the steroid use of a prominent Hall of Famer that played the majority of his career in the 70′s and 80′s… Ha! Not like I was shocked but damn… So many members of the Hall of Fame, including this character, have recently spoken out and condemned guys who have had ties to performance enhancing drugs, saying there is no place for “cheaters” in the HOF… I just wonder how many of the other guys in the “Hall” were actually cheaters themselves?

This is not the first time we have heard that there is a steroid user in the Hall of Fame; Jose Canseco has said there is a steroids user already in the Hall.

The Baseball Hall of Fame has very specific rules against cheating and considers a player’s character as part of the criteria for admission. No players were elected to the Hall this year because the most accomplished players up for eligibility all had ties to steroids. Most of the sanctity of Cooperstown would be eliminated if it turned out that they had already elected a cheater.

In addition to his revelation about the Hall of Famer who used PEDs, Byrnes explained why he wants harsher penalties for current users who get busted.

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Someone called 104.5 pretending to be Shane Spencer admitting to using steroids

Shane SpencerA man claiming to be former New York Yankees outfielder Shane Spencer called into Albany sports radio station 104.5 The Team on Monday and gave an interview where he spoke about steroids among the Yankees.

Spencer played for the Yankees from 1998-2002, batting .263 with 43 home runs for the team while winning three World Series championships. In the interview, the person claiming to be Spencer made a steroids admission and apparently spoke about other members of those Yankees teams using ‘roids.

A podcast of the interview with the phony Spencer remained on 104.5 The Team’s website until being pulled down on Tuesday night after the station learned of the hoax. Word of the interview made its way to the Yankees clubhouse, leading Derek Jeter to have one of the team’s video coordinators call the real Spencer, who serves as the hitting coach Somerset Patriots of the Atlantic League.

“I listened to (the interview) for about a minute and I about threw up,” Spencer told ESPN New York on Tuesday. “I just want it out there that it wasn’t me.”

What’s odd is that the show’s host, Mike Lindsley, had been emailing Spencer over the weekend trying to set up an interview for Monday, but they could not settle on a time.

Spencer issued the following statement about the interview to ESPN New York and other outlets:

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Justin Verlander upset by Jack Clark’s ‘moronic’ steroids accusation

Justin Verlander TigersLike Albert Pujols, Justin Verlander is upset with Jack Clark for accusing him of using steroids. The Detroit Tigers pitcher is not threatening legal action against the former all-star, but he does think the radio host’s accusations this week were moronic.

On his new radio show and in an interview with the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Clark said Albert Pujols’ former trainer told him Pujols used steroids. Also on his radio show, Clark accused Verlander of juicing.

“Verlander was like Nolan Ryan, he threw 97, 98, 100 miles an hour from the first inning to the ninth inning,” Clark said on the air, per the Post-Dispatch. “He got that big contract, now he can barely reach 92, 93. What happened to it? He has no arm problems, nothing’s wrong. It’s just the signs are there.”

Verlander, who has been one of the hardest throwers in the game since breaking into the bigs in 2005, dismissed Clark’s accusations.

“It’s moronic,” Verlander said, via the Detroit Free Press. “Look at the source. It’s moronic to talkabout something you know nothing about and clearly … he’s not watching.

“There is no merit in what he is talking about. He’s not watching me pitch. Because if did he would’ve seen my last start, right? He’s saying I’m struggling to hit 93, 94? I averaged 97 and hit a 100 in my last start. So clearly he doesn’t know what he’s talking about.”

Verlander is right — he touched 101 mph during his start on Tuesday. His velocity has been down this season, but that is following a trend that has existed since 2009. Verlander peaked with an average fastball velocity of 95.6 mph in 2009. He averaged 95.4 mph in 2010; 95.0 in 2011; 94.3 in 2012; and now 93.0 this season, per FanGraphs’ metrics. He’s having a down year by his standards, but he hasn’t been bad. He’s still been a very valuable pitcher. He’s also 30 years old and has thrown over 1,700 innings in his career. Pitchers tend to wear down over the years, and that seems like a more likely explanation for Verlander’s problems this season than steroids.

Jack Clark accuses Albert Pujols of using steroids, also mentions Justin Verlander

Albert-Pujols-Angels-slumpFormer MLB slugger Jack Clark began working as a radio host on WGNU 920 AM’s afternoon slot this week, and he has already managed to gain national attention. Clark, who belted 340 home runs over his 18-year MLB career, has mentioned twice how former personal trainer Chris Mihlfeld told him he injected Albert Pujols with performance-enhancing drugs.

Mihlfeld used to be Pujols’ personal trainer. In 2006, Mihlfeld’s name was linked to performance-enhancing drugs after Jason Grimsley, one of his former clients, admitted to taking steroids. That resulted in Pujols having to defend himself against PED accusations, which has has done several times since.

During a phone interview with the St. Louis Post-Dispatch on Thursday, Clark spoke about how he worked with Mihlfeld in 2000 as a coach of the Los Angeles Dodgers and said the former personal trainer tried to encourage him to take steroids like Pujols was. Clark claims he was simply looking for a nutrition program, which led to the following exchange with Mihlfeld.

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Adrian Peterson views steroids, HGH chatter as a compliment

Adrian PetersonAdrian Peterson’s incredibly fast recovery from a torn ACL and MCL left people shocked, impressed, amazed, and suspicious. The Minnesota Vikings running back tore two ligaments in late December 2011, yet he returned to play in Week 1 of the 2012 NFL season and proceeded to have one of the best seasons for a running back in league history … while playing through a sports hernia no less.

The reigning NFL MVP said last week that he’s looking forward to HGH testing in the league because he wants officials to catch the cheating players. The irony is that many believe Peterson was using some illegal substance that helped him recover from his major knee injury so quickly and perform so well. Peterson told the Minneapolis Star Tribune that he views those suspicions as a compliment.

Peterson said in the interview that he’s heard the suspicious folks on Twitter and on the field.

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