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Cubs sue fake ‘Billy Cub’ mascot who got in bar fight

As if the Chicago Cubs don’t already have enough to worry about with improving their last-place team, now they have to worry about legal matters with unauthorized mascots.

Billy Cub mascotExactly one year ago we passed along a story about the Cubs sending a cease and desist letter to a man who was parading around Wrigleyville as an unauthorized mascot. The man, John Paul Weier, wears a furry costume and Cubs jersey with the name “Billy Cub” on the back. He recruited others to wear the mascot as well, and they show up around Wrigley Field to take pictures with fans, dance with them, and do other things.

But their behavior hasn’t been that of a typical mascot.

The Cubs allege that the men charge for pictures and ask for tips. They also allegedly have made rude, profane and derogatory remarks to fans and season ticket holders. The “Billy Cub” mascot is not affiliated with the team and therefore making the organization look bad, the team says. And that is why they filed a lawsuit Friday.

According to the Chicago Sun-Times, the Cubs filed a lawsuit against Weier and his mascot friends, saying the men are not affiliated with the organization and that they are violating the team’s trademarks by using the character to mislead people. What’s worse is that the men are accused of trying to profit off the fake mascot character.

The Sun-Times says the suit alleges that “Weier owns or operates websites and social media accounts dedicated to promoting the Billy Cub character, and has sold merchandise related to the character.”

The Cubs are suing for damages, legal fees and all the profits the men have made from the character on grounds of trademark infringement, deceptive trade practice and injury to the Cubs’ reputation.

Surely you laugh at the thought that a fake mascot harming the Cubs’ reputation more than the Cubs have already done by not winning a World Series since 1908 … but a video of the Billy Cub punching a guy at a bar went viral a few months ago, and that’s definitely something the Cubs don’t want to be associated with. Then when you combine them mistreating fans or charging for things, that’s enough to tick off an organization. It’s clear the guy behind the “Billy Cub” is being a real jackass. The Cubs are going to win this suit and should.

Next up I hope the Cubs sue this TV network for making their mascot look even worse!

Head over to Page 2 to see many pictures of Billy Cub posing with fans.

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Cubs scoreboard operator falls asleep

The Chicago Cubs defeated the New York Mets in a 2-1 pitchers’ duel on Tuesday night that was apparently too much for a certain scoreboard operator to handle. In the top of the fifth inning, one of the guys who sits behind the manual scoreboard at Wrigley Field was caught on camera catching some Z’s.

Of course, Mets broadcaster Keith Hernandez couldn’t resist sharing his thoughts.

“Ohhh, he’s fired,” Hernandez said while chuckling. “Sorry pal, your supervisor will be calling you shortly.”

Those manual scoreboards can take a lot out of you, though I’m guessing the Cubs have more than one employee operating that massive thing. One thing’s for sure — the guy who fell asleep is ready to leave all the nostalgia of Wrigley Field in the rearview and catch up with the times.

Cubs-scoreboard-operator-sleeping

H/T Cut 4

Cubs threw 400-pound Wrigley Field cake in a dumpster

Wrigley-Field-cake

Wrigley Field turned 100 years old on Wednesday, and the Chicago Cubs celebrated in a variety of ways. The one that got the most attention across the internet was the 400-pound birthday cake the team put on display outside the ballpark. The cake, which was a Wrigley Field replica, was created by Carlo’s Bakery. If you have watched “Cake Boss,” you are probably familiar with Carlo’s.

The 4-foot by 5-foot cake was reportedly created by four people and took six days to complete. Talk about a keeper, right? Wrong. The person who was supposedly in charge of disposing of the massive cake posted several photos of it on Reddit after the game. It wound up dismantled and in a dumpster:

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Cubs: Sammy Sosa needs to make amends before returning to Wrigley Field

Sammy Sosa

Though he is not as beloved as some other franchise icons like Ryne Sandberg, Sammy Sosa was one of the most productive players in Chicago Cubs history. From 1992-2004, Sosa belted 293 home runs at Wrigley Field, including the 1998 season where he and Mark McGwire both broke Roger Maris’ record of 61 home runs in a season. You think that that type of production would make him welcome to return to Wrigley Field for all events, but that’s not the case.

Sosa was not invited Wednesday when the Cubs held festivities to commemorate the 100-year anniversary of Wrigley Field. A team spokesperson said Sosa needs to make amends with the franchise first.

“There are some things Sammy needs to look at and consider prior to having an engagement with the team,” Cubs spokesman Julian Green said.

ESPN Chicago says one of the things Sosa needs to do is apologize to some of his former teammates for his actions at the end of the 2004 season. Sosa sat out the final game of the season and left the stadium before the game ended. He was traded to the Baltimore Orioles after the season.

The team has interest in mending things with the Cubs. Sosa also said last year that he would like to have his jersey retired by the team.

Let’s just hope they’ve made it clear to Sosa what they’re hoping and expecting to see from him. If they’re just waiting for Sosa to come out of nowhere and apologize to former teammates, it’s probably not going to happen.

Forearm bash to Eye on Baseball

Fake Cubs mascot Billy Cub punches a dude in a bar (Video)

Billy-Cub-bar-fightYou know that unofficial Chicago Cubs mascot that Major League Baseball sent a cease and desist letter to last season? Apparently it didn’t work. The friendly(?) bear known as “Billy Cub” is alive, well and punching dudes in bars for trying to screw with him.

Billy was interacting with fans in a bar outside Wrigley Field over the weekend when some jokester came up behind him and snatched his head off. We don’t know why the thief thought this would be a good idea, but Billy reacted by socking him in the face. He then got into an altercation with another person before exiting the building.

We’re not sure if this was Billy Cub creator John Paul Weier or one of his disciples, but the exchange probably isn’t going to make the Cubs happy. One of the Billy Cub characters has already been accused of using racially-insensitive language and getting into arguments with fans over tips. Bar fights, whether started by Billy Cub or not, are not going to help his case.

Video via Deadspin

Cubs lose first challenge in MLB history (Video)

First-MLB-challengeCan you think of a more fitting way for Major League Baseball to debut its new instant replay system than for the Chicago Cubs to lose a challenge? Neither can we.

The first regular season instant replay challenge in MLB history took place in the fifth inning of Chicago’s game against the Pittsburgh Pirates on Monday. Cubs pitcher Jeff Samardzija bunted into a double play with runners on first and second, and Chicago manager Rick Renteria believed Samardzija had beaten the throw to first.

Renteria called timeout and told crew chief John Hirschbeck that he wanted the play to be reviewed. Hirschbeck then called the replay command center in New York and the play stood as called. The entire process lasted about a minute and a half.

Do the Cubs know how to lose or do the Cubs know how to lose?

Cubs fire team psychologist, who had bizarre relationship with players

Theo-Epstein-Cubs-CurfewIf any of the Chicago Cubs are having problems that they want to discuss with a professional next season, they will have to sit down and chat with a new doctor. Marc Strickland, the team’s psychologist, was fired over the weekend. Strickland has reportedly been on the psychologist hot seat for a while, but ownership had been insistent upon keeping him around.

According to the Paul Sullivan of the Chicago Tribune, Cubs president of baseball operations Theo Epstein made the decision to fire Strickland. Why? Because he had an extremely bizarre relationship with the players.

Not only was Strickland available for consultation with players, the specialist in sports psychology had his own locker at home and on the road, dressed in team workout gear and played catch and shagged balls before games during batting practice.

Early in his first year in the majors, Strickland even stood in the dugout tunnel at Wrigley Field after victories, bumping fists with players as though he was part of the team.

The team psychologist is a person players should feel comfortable talking to, but he certainly shouldn’t be shagging fly balls and chumming it up with the team. It’s hard to maintain a professional relationship when you’re just another one of the guys, which is what Strickland seemed to be.

Sullivan added that outfielder Nate Schierholtz was asked what Strickland’s “purpose” was with the team, and he responded, “I’m not really sure.” That should tell you all you need to know.

H/T Eye on Baseball