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Floyd Mayweather Jr. Suspected of Domestic Violence with Josie Harris

We didn’t exactly cover Floyd Mayweather Jr.’s racist and stereotypical rant last week against Manny Pacquiao, preferring to limit ourselves to coverage of his $50,000 iPod instead. To summarize my thoughts on the matter, the entire issue is a product of Mayweather’s stupidity; he’s so ignorant he doesn’t even realize that what he said was racist and how much he botched his stereotypes anyway.

Well, looks like some karma is catching up to Pretty Boy. TMZ Sports reported Thursday that Mayweather is a suspect in a domestic violence case with the mother of his children, Josie Harris. According to TMZ, “cops received a call at 5:03 AM from Floyd’s baby mama, Josie Harris, who claimed the boxer attacked her.”

Thirty Mile Zone points out that Harris was going to get a restraining order against Floyd, but it’s hard to know how trustworthy Harris is. Harris accused Floyd of assaulting her inside a car in 2003 but it was later determined she lied.

I don’t know what happened early Thursday morning nor do I know what will happen, but we do know this: Floyd Mayweather Jr. does not have the mental agility to escape this sort of trouble. The money yes, but not the mental power.

Sources:
Floyd Mayweather Jr. Suspect in Domestic Violence [TMZ Sports]

Floyd Mayweather’s Entourage Enjoys a Cockfight

Looks like we’ve figured out some more of what Floyd Mayweather Jr. has been doing while he avoids Manny Pacquiao. The 3rd highest-earning American athlete in 2010 is spending some time in Puerto Rico with his crew, and they’ve been videotaping various moments of their vacation. One of the spots they shot some footage from was a cockfighting arena called Club Gallistico de Puerto Rico.

I’m curious if Mayweather wagered his $50,000 iPod on a fight. I wouldn’t doubt it. Here’s the video of Floyd Mayweather’s crew at a cockfight, courtesy of You Been Blinded. You can’t actually see Floyd but if you look at YouTube user mig5353‘s videos you’ll see him. If you’re like me and find cockfighting to be disturbing, don’t bother watching.

Sources:
Floyd Mayweather Not Too Chicken For Cockfighting [You Been Blinded]
Video Credit: YouTube user mig5353

I Wish My Car Was Worth as Much as Floyd Mayweather’s iPod

No, I don’t have a car that’s worth less than $300. Floyd Mayweather Jr. just so happens to have an iPod that’s valued at $50,000.  Yeah, you read that correctly and no, I didn’t add any extra zeros.  Looks like Floyd has been using all the spare time he has from blowing off Manny Pacquiao to pimp his iPod.

Honestly, who has a diamond iPod?  The man who made the third most money of any American athlete over the past year, that’s who.  Thanks to F-Listed who brought our attention to Mayweather’s Twitter for the photo and accompanying Tweet that reads, “Any artist in my i-pod is platinum thanx to the case…lol.”

Breaking Down America’s 50 Highest-Earning Athletes

Sports Illustrated has released its seventh annual “Fortunate 50″ list, which gives us a sense of the type of money American athletes made last year based on salary, winnings, endorsements and appearance fees.  Despite the epic downfall of his image, Tiger Woods remained at the top of the list with nearly $30 million to spare.  Phil Mickelson held strong at No. 2 on the list and can probably thank Tiger’s demise for any extra cash that may have been thrown his way over the past year.   Here are a few aspects of the list that stuck out to me:

Floyd Mayweather Jr.: Want an idea of how much money can be made in boxing?  Mayweather, who may or may not be ducking Manny Pacquiao, checked in at No. 3 on the list after not being ranked in 2009.  While most of the top athletes on the list rake in a ton in endorsements, Mayweather made only $250,000 in endorsement deals and the rest — $60 million — in salary and winnings.  A bout with Shane Mosley alone earned him $40 million.

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Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Shane Mosley Begin USADA Olympic-Style Drug Testing

One of the criticisms of Floyd Mayweather Jr. was that he was holding up the fight with Manny Pacquiao because of outrageous demands that both fighters submit to random drug testing including blood tests. Critics say Mayweather was making these demands because he was afraid to fight Pacquiao. While I believe Mayweather took these steps because he knows how dangerous of a fighter Manny is, Floyd has displayed consistency in his new views on drug testing. Pretty Boy made Sugar Shane Mosley agree to random, Olympics-style drug testing prior to their fight, and they will begin that testing on Monday, March 22nd.

“I am excited that Shane Mosley and I are willing to take these tests to ensure a fair fight on May 1,” said Mayweather. “I just want to show the world that boxing is a clean sport and it is my hope that all fighters will take a similar stance and responsibility which reflects sportsmanship at the highest level and sets a new standard for safety in boxing.”

“I think the testing program is a great idea and I did not hesitate for a minute about agreeing to it,” said Mosley. “Let’s hope that the rest of the boxing world follows Floyd’s and my example.”

It’s a great sign that the two fighters have agreed to the random testing to come as close as possible to ensuring a level playing field, PED-wise. I really do hope that all boxing commissions in the U.S. and all sanctioning bodies around the world follow the precedent set by Mayweather and Mosley. As I’ve said all along, if Manny Pacquiao doesn’t have anything to hide then he shouldn’t have a problem with random blood testing. What might he be hiding that urine tests might not detect, you ask? Check out this list from USADA via FanHouse: Human Growth Hormone (HGH), Homologus Blood Tranfusion (HBT), Synthetic Hemoglobin (HBOC) and the passport program. That’s what Pacquiao could be hiding, amongst others. Why not submit to this program to prove he’s clean? That’s all he has to do, and with the health risks and physically demanding nature of the sport, why not level the playing field for all fighters as best as we can?

Sources:
USADA’s Travis Tygart Says ‘Test Blood’; Richard Schaefer, ‘Zero Tolerance’ [FanHouse]

Manny Pacquiao Plans to Sue one Steroids Accuser but Fight Another

In one of the greatest paradoxes I’ve seen in sports, Manny Pacquiao and his camp are making making themselves look even worse for their recent decisions. The madness began a few days ago when the agreement between Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Manny Pacquiao to fight on March 13th began to fall through. Pacquiao began backing out of the fight because he didn’t want to submit to olympic-style drug testing. Manny’s promoter, Bob Arum, then went on a verbal assault trying to come up with every possible angle to spin the reason for why Pacquiao is backing out. Pacman is even going on the offensive now, saying he’s going to sue for defamation over the allegations. In the meantime (and this is my favorite part of the story), Arum says he’s in the process of arranging a fight with Paulie Malignaggi for the same March 13th date. This is the same Paulie Malignaggi who ALSO accused Pacquiao of using PEDs:

The level we have of testing in boxing is not really that deep. I mean, we have urine tests on the day of the fight and we don’t have much else…there’s things that don’t come up in drug tests. There’s ways to beat drug tests.

Manny Pacquiao is the first guy in history, and he might be the special thing that everybody says he is, he might be, the first guy in history to go up in weight and knock out more people as he goes up in weight than he did when he was smaller. He might be that special person. Me, I think that looks a little fishy. I think that’s a little bit fishy.

So let me get this straight, it’s fine to accuse Manny Pacquiao of using steroids or performance-enhancers so long as you don’t demand he submits to strict drug testing? Good, just wanted to make sure I had that straight. This should put an end to the debates about Pacquiao and Arum’s motive. Manny complaining that having his blood drawn will sap him of his power is like one of those people who claim they can levitate so long as nobody is watching. Uh huh. The onus is on Pacquiao here and he should submit to Olympic-style testing if he has nothing to hide. End of story.

If Manny Pacquiao Weren’t Guilty, He Wouldn’t Have Anything to Hide

Maybe things happened too quickly creating a “too good to be true” scenario in boxing. After all, organizing a fight and getting two high-profile individuals to agree to contract terms is one of the most complex processes in sports. Despite all that, Manny Pacquiao and Floyd Mayweather Jr. supposedly had agreed to fight mid March in Las Vegas until a matter of drug testing came in the way.

Floyd’s father accused Pacquiao of using steroids and/or supplements in an interview a few months ago and it looks like he was right on. Mayweather’s camp wants both fighters to submit to Olympic-style WADA drug testing prior to the fight, which is more stringent than drug testing outlined by the Nevada Gaming Commission. Pacquiao only wants to submit to drug testing prior to the media kickoff tour of the fight and after the fight. It does not take a genius to figure out that the lapse between tests is plenty of time to do a cycle of drugs.

The excuses coming from Pacquiao’s side are pathetic. Trainer Freddie Roach says the request proves Mayweather is scared. Promoter Bob Arum says Floyd is just harassing Pacquiao because he knows Manny feels weakened by giving blood. There’s no doubt that Floyd recognizes the talent of Pacquiao and that he’s in danger of losing. Even with that being the case, there’s nothing wrong with requesting stringent drug testing for the fight. The retort by Arum is pathetic and offbase. It’s clear he’s just trying to spin the issue but he doesn’t have much ammunition in this argument. The undeniable bottom line is that Pacquiao would not have anything to hide if he weren’t doing anything wrong. What’s so hard about Manny agreeing to random drug tests during his training? There shouldn’t be anything wrong with it as far as I can tell. Maybe there’s a lot more to Pacquiao’s story that helps explain his late career surge.