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NFL Selling Photos of James Harrison’s Illegal Hit on Mohamed Massaquoi

We told you earlier about how the NFL has begun taking the right steps to minimize head shots by handing out hefty fines for brutal hits that occurred over the weekend.  We might be taking that back.  The fines are still a good idea, but is it morally correct for the NFL to be profiting from memorabilia that has to do with those same illegal hits?

Pro Football Talk has brought to our attention that the photo above is available in the NFL.com photo store for a price of anywhere from $15.95 to $249.95, depending on the size you’d like to purchase.  Huh?  So the hits are dangerous, illegal, and unacceptable, but it’s okay to sell them as wall ornaments?  Something’s not right here.

If the NFL is trying to send a message, they need to send it through all mediums.  Selling a photo of the an illegal hit is simply glorifying the play and implying that it’s an exciting part of the game.  If that’s the way the league’s going to treat the situation, they shouldn’t expect anyone to take them seriously.

James Harrison: Orton Stepped in Front of the Train, Got What He Deserved

Kyle Orton a trash talker?  I wouldn’t have guessed that, but I suppose you never know.  James Harrison insists that the Broncos quarterback was talking smack during Sunday night’s Steelers-Broncos preseason game and ended up getting what he deserved as a result.  It may only be the preseason, but Denver’s quarterbacks are taking a beating.

Harrison recovered a fumble in the game (a call that was overturned) and Orton attempted to tackle him after he scooped the loose ball.  The result was exactly the one we’d expect to see when a quarterback tries to tackle a 250-pound linebacker (hint: something similar to what Ndamukong Suh did to Jake Delhomme).  Harrison felt no remorse, to say the least.

He was running his mouth and getting in the way of the train,” Harrison said after the game, per Mike Klis of the Denver Post.  “And the train wasn’t coming off the track.”

“He was popping off down there the first time they were about to score,” Harrison said.  “So you run your mouth, expect to get something.  Everything’s between the lines, so he got what he had coming.”

Orton should have known that only James Harrison is allowed to run his mouth, even if it’s about taking a trip to the White House.  Love the whole “getting in the way of the train” thing, too.  He should copyright that phrase.  I’ve never heard it before.

Source:
James Harrison says Kyle Orton “got what he had coming” [Pro Football Talk]

Steelers LB James Harrison Spits on Super Bowl Champ White House Tradition

James Harrison was the Defensive Player of the Year in the NFL and a big reason why the Steelers reached and won the Super Bowl this past season. The win marked Harrison’s second Super Bowl win in his career, meaning his team was invited to the White House to be honored and recognized by the President once again. Harrison declined the invitation to attend the first ceremony and will do the same this time around as well. He explained his decision to WTAE:

“This is how I feel — if you want to see the Pittsburgh Steelers, invite us when we don’t win the Super Bowl. As far as I’m concerned, he [Obama] would’ve invited Arizona if they had won.”

Man, I am all for the idea of not wanting to bend over for anyone or smooch butt, but this is the President we’re talking about here, not some team passing you up in the draft or a coach saying you’re not good enough. There’s no reason to hold the grudge against the Prez — these things are determined beforehand — everyone knows the winning team of all major sporting events gets honored at the White House. It’s not like the Prez is channel surfing ESPN for players to hang out with and play golf with, he’s got a few other things to take care of. If Harrison had won MVP would he have declined the invitation to Disneyland saying Disneyland should come visit him?

I appreciate Harrison’s attitude, edge, and underdog mentality, but being invited because of tradition isn’t a sign of disrespect. I hope he doesn’t get pressured into going now that he’s shared his thoughts and sure to take criticism — he should stick to his guns.

An Injury to the Long Snapper the Difference in Giants/Steelers Game

It’s crazy to think that something seemingly so menial as a long snapper can be the difference in a football game, but that was the case for the Steelers and Giants on Sunday. Pittsburgh long snapper Greg Warren blew out his knee in the third quarter leaving the Steelers with few options for their punts. It was pretty much go for it on 4th down, or take your chances with the backup long snapper. And when I say backup long snapper, I’m not talking about a backup the way there’s a backup quarterback — with only 53 players on a game day roster, no team carries two long snappers. Linebacker James Harrison — who had never snapped before in a game — volunteered for the duties after fooling around with it during the past few training camps. The result was pretty brutal.

Harrison snapped the ball way over punter Mitch Berger’s head and out the back of the end zone, resulting in a safety. That tied the game at 14 in the 4th quarter and it also gave the ball back to the Giants with good field position. A few positive plays later, the Giants had the ball at the 2 and completed a touchdown pass from Eli Manning to Kevin Boss to take the lead. At 14-12, the Steelers were in control of the game until that long snap doomed them. I still liked Mike Tomlin’s response to the question about the situation: Tomlin brushed aside the injury saying that they play with whatever they have and don’t make excuses. He also praised Harrison for stepping up and volunteering to assume the duties. Too bad something so small as an injury to their long snapper had to hinder their chances to win such a crucial game, but that is the life in the NFL.