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Johnathan Joseph: Texans are a better team than the Patriots (UPDATED)

The Houston Texans had a chance at redemption against the New England Patriots last weekend and failed to cash in. Just four weeks removed from an embarrassing 42-14 loss at Gillette Stadium, the Texans were once again dominated in every facet of the game. Anyone who watched both games was left with one simple conclusion — the Patriots are a better team.

Johnathan Joseph does not agree. Despite the two beatings, the Houston corner feels that the Texans are still a better team than New England.

“Obviously we had the right guys in here to win 13 ballgames to get up to that point,” Joseph told CSNHouston.com on Monday. “For whatever reason, we didn’t advance. I still can’t put that over because I think we were a better team. I think we just didn’t make the plays at the right time.”

I’m afraid it doesn’t work like that. The 2-14 Jacksonville Jaguars were a play or two away from beating the Patriots in Week 16. Does that mean they are a better team? New England outscored Houston 83-42 in their two match-ups, and a couple of late touchdowns made the playoff meeting seem closer than it actually was. However, Joseph doesn’t think the numbers mean much.

“Not at all,” he said when asked if New England is a significantly better team. “Just four or five plays. You take a few of those plays that they made and go the other way, it’s a different ballgame.”

Whatever helps you sleep at night. The not-so-athletic Wes Welker (according to Wade Phillips) caught eight passes for 133 yards. Tom Brady threw for 344 yards, three touchdowns and no interceptions against a typically solid Houston secondary. I can understand Joseph thinking the first beating was an outlier, but twice is not a coincidence. At the end of the day, the Texans handed the Patriots two of their easiest wins of the season. Considering some of the poor opponents New England faced this year, that certainly has to say something.

UPDATE: CSNHouston.com has since changed their headline after the Texans’ PR staff informed them that Joseph was simply speaking about the gap between Houston and New England, not saying the Texans are a better team.

Photo credit: Brett Davis-US PRESSWIRE

Johnathan Joseph says the Bengals limited how much Gatorade players could have

When players leave the Bengals organization, they are happy to get away from what has ultimately been a losing environment. In his first five NFL seasons, Texans cornerback Johnathan Joseph was stuck in Cincinnati. The team finished with a winning record only twice during that span and failed to win a playoff game. Last year, Joseph was able to escape to Houston and join a contender. In fact, his new team beat his old squad in the opening round of the playoffs. But Joseph was thrilled to get away for reasons that span beyond wins and losses.

“The first thing about Houston is it’s an organization run from a different perspective,” he said during an interview with HeraldOnline.com. “In Cincy, the team lives off money it earns from football. Houston’s owner has other business interests and he controls the money. Numerous things that go on such as the way Houston interacts with my family; we’re treated in a first-class way. They helped us when my wife lost our baby daughter in a miscarriage.

“But they help with anything you ask of them because they are a very caring organization with positive attitudes about its players. In Cincy, we’re told how much Gatorade we could take home. In Houston we get what we request. You get soap and deodorant at your request. You don’t have a roommate on road trips.”

Professional athletes love being pampered, and it sounds like Cincy is not the place to be if you want first-class treatment. Those of you who have seen the movie “Moneyball” are probably thinking about how the A’s charged $1 for soda in the clubhouse — something that supposedly irritated the players. Clearly, it is not just the fans on their death bed who dislike the Bengals organization.

H/T Sports by Brooks Live
Photo credit: Brett Davis-US PRESSWIRE