Quantcast

Floyd Mayweather Sr. Still Hinting He Thinks Manny Pacquiao Is on Something

The news was announced late Tuesday night that Manny Pacquiao’s next fight would be May 7th in the United States at a venue to be determined. The opponents being discussed are Juan Manuel Marquez, Shane Mosley, and Andre Berto. Frankly, I speak for all boxing fans when I say I don’t care who he’s fighting if it’s not Floyd Mayweather Jr.

The Pacquiao-Mayweather fight is the ones fans and analysts have wanted to see for the past few years. Floyd has said he has nothing to gain by fighting Pacquiao, and the negotiations become strained when they talk about drug testing. Floyd Mayweather Sr. also hasn’t helped matters suggesting Manny is on something and calling him out with slurs. He continued the same behavior in a recent interview with Fight Hype, hinting he still believes Pacquiao is on something (go to 1:40 mark):

He says that Pacquiao can’t whip his son, but he doesn’t want Floyd to fight Pacquiao because he has his own reasons. That’s contradictory, no? If Pacquiao can’t whip his son, then why would he be afraid of the fight? There really isn’t a reason, unless he’s still hinting he thinks Pacquiao is on something, right?

Mayweather Ducking or Delaying Fight with Pacquiao?

With promoter Bob Arum‘s deadline of midnight for Floyd Mayweather Jr. to accept a fight with Manny Pacquiao passing, it appears as if we will be waiting several more months before seeing the super-bout take place. Since Arum was the only one talking to the media, we only heard one side of the story — Pacquiao’s. Arum suggested that Mayweather was afraid of Manny and that’s the reason the fight wasn’t arranged. Like I said, that’s only one side of the story and because Arum has the megaphone, it’s the one most people are accepting. Mayweather could end all this speculation by simply announcing his plans, but he hasn’t done that.

Instead, we have to rely on the words of David Mayo of The Grand Rapids Press who has come up with four potential reasons why Mayweather has not yet agreed to the fight. The basis of Mayo’s suggestions is that Mayweather is merely delaying the fight until next year, not ducking his opponent. Here are the reasons:

[Read more...]

Pacquiao/Clottey Pay-Per-View Numbers Could Hurt Mayweather Negotiations

Pretty much every story in the boxing world can be tied back to one core issue: when will Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Manny Pacquiao fight? I don’t care how many Roy Jones Jr./Bernard Hopkins fights or Andre Berto battles they promote, there’s only one issue that matters to me and the general sports public: Mayweather and Pacquiao. While Pacman took care of business by destroying Joshua Clottey two weeks ago, Mayweather still has to hold his end up by beating the BALCO-less Shane Mosley. Assuming that happens in May, the two camps will be back to their familiar posturing as they try to negotiate a deal. As if the issue of drug testing didn’t already provide enough of a hurdle, now we have another one.

HBO announced Tuesday that the Manny Pacquiao/Joshua Clottey drubbing in Arlington generated 700,000 pay-per-view buys. Floyd Mayweather Jr.’s most recent fight, a win over Juan Manuel Marquez, produced a million PPV buys. Making matters worse for Manny, his fight with Marquez in ’08 generated around 400,000 PPV buys. Of course that figure is relative because Pacquiao’s popularity has exploded in the past two years and Mayweather’s fight was his first out of retirement, but it’s no less indicative of potential future problems. That Mayweather against a lesser name almost outdrew Pacquiao against a lesser name by 50% will be a sticking point in negotiations between the two.

Mayweather’s camp will use those numbers as leverage to say he’s the bigger draw and that he deserves a bigger share of the purse. Pacquiao’s camp will counter by saying that Manny’s a global figure and an equally large draw. While Floyd’s numbers are more impressive, here’s what I think the most fair way to settle it is: split the purse 50-50. Floyd can generate one million buys on his own and Pacquiao can probably generate around 700,000, but the two of them fighting against each other would cause numbers to explode — 3.5 million pay-per-view buys, anyone? The sum of their parts creates an intrigue that’s greater than each of their wholes. 50-50 split, guys. It’s the most fair way to divvy the millions.

Of course now we’re just going to see Mayweather lose to Mosley, but that’s besides the point.

Sources:
Pacquiao-Clottey generates 700,000 pay-per-view buys [USA Today]

Manny Pacquiao, Freddie Roach Call Out Floyd Mayweather Jr.

Saturday March 13th, 2010 was supposed to be around the same time Manny Pacquiao and Floyd Mayweather Jr. were to fight. The dream matchup never went through because Floyd wanted Pacquiao to follow pre-fight Olympics-style drug testing but Manny Pacquiao refused. Instead, Pacquiao filled the void in his schedule with Joshua Clottey and Mayweather moved onto Sugar Shane Mosley. Pacquiao whopped up on Clottey as many expected, and that naturally drew all the postfight questions regarding a potential bout with Floyd Mayweather Jr. Both Pacman and his trainer Freddie Roach seemed eager to touch gloves with Pretty Boy in their post fight interview on HBO PPV:

Pacquiao: “It’s up to him. For me, it’s no problem to fight him. I will fight him anytime. He should win against Mosley. If not, Mosley and I will fight. [Floyd's] style is not a difficult style; he needs to handle his business in his next fight.”

Roach: “It’s the fight the world wants to see. Me and Manny want to see it. Floyd, let the commission do their job — you don’t run the sport! Get in the ring and fight us.”

Sure, Mayweather may be scared of fighting Pacquiao — for good reason — Pacman’s dangerous. But as I’ve said before and as I’ll say again until Manny relents, submitting to random drug testing should not be a problem unless Pacquiao has something to hide. Sack up Manny, take the tests, and let’s hope for a Mayweather win so the world can get what it wants. Plus, how could either fighter turn down an easy $30-$40 million payday?

If Manny Pacquiao Weren’t Guilty, He Wouldn’t Have Anything to Hide

Maybe things happened too quickly creating a “too good to be true” scenario in boxing. After all, organizing a fight and getting two high-profile individuals to agree to contract terms is one of the most complex processes in sports. Despite all that, Manny Pacquiao and Floyd Mayweather Jr. supposedly had agreed to fight mid March in Las Vegas until a matter of drug testing came in the way.

Floyd’s father accused Pacquiao of using steroids and/or supplements in an interview a few months ago and it looks like he was right on. Mayweather’s camp wants both fighters to submit to Olympic-style WADA drug testing prior to the fight, which is more stringent than drug testing outlined by the Nevada Gaming Commission. Pacquiao only wants to submit to drug testing prior to the media kickoff tour of the fight and after the fight. It does not take a genius to figure out that the lapse between tests is plenty of time to do a cycle of drugs.

The excuses coming from Pacquiao’s side are pathetic. Trainer Freddie Roach says the request proves Mayweather is scared. Promoter Bob Arum says Floyd is just harassing Pacquiao because he knows Manny feels weakened by giving blood. There’s no doubt that Floyd recognizes the talent of Pacquiao and that he’s in danger of losing. Even with that being the case, there’s nothing wrong with requesting stringent drug testing for the fight. The retort by Arum is pathetic and offbase. It’s clear he’s just trying to spin the issue but he doesn’t have much ammunition in this argument. The undeniable bottom line is that Pacquiao would not have anything to hide if he weren’t doing anything wrong. What’s so hard about Manny agreeing to random drug tests during his training? There shouldn’t be anything wrong with it as far as I can tell. Maybe there’s a lot more to Pacquiao’s story that helps explain his late career surge.

Floyd Mayweather Jr: I have Nothing to Gain by Fighting Manny Pacquiao

After seeing Manny Pacquiao dismantle Miguel Cotto on Saturday night, I said that a Pacquiao/Floyd Mayweather Jr. fight has to happen for the sake of boxing’s integrity. There’s only one fight left that makes sense for each fighter. One fight, and one fight only, and it’s between them. Unfortunately Pacquiao expressed no immediate interest in fighting Floyd, and Floyd has gone on record saying he doesn’t want to do business with Bob Arum (Manny’s promoter). Making matters worse is that Floyd told Sky News he feels like he has nothing to gain by fighting Pacquiao:

Floyd says that everyone wants to see him lose while Manny’s already lost three times therefore there’s no upside for him. While there’s no erasing Pacquiao’s three losses and Floyd’s undefeated record, there is a question as to who is the best pound-for-pound fighter in the world and who the top welterweight is. Right now Pacman is on top of his game and considered to be every bit as good as Floyd. Because of that reason, Mayweather stands plenty to gain by fighting (and beating) Manny. The term “undisputed” champion is often used in boxing. Right now there’s a dispute that can only be settled in the ring. Floyd should recognize that and make this fight happen to boost his legacy. After that, beating Sugar Shane Mosley would just be icing on the cake of an unblemished career.

Manny Pacquiao Has No Immediate Plans to Fight Floyd Mayweather Jr.

The Manny Pacquiao/Miguel Cotto fight was shaping up to be an epic battle up until the 4th round when Manny caught Miguel with a right hand that sent him to the canvas for the second time in the fight. From that point on, it was pure dominance for the speedy, powerful Filipino. It got so bad that Cotto’s family had to leave the arena after the 9th round to avoid seeing Miguel get punished. The point is that Pacquiao proved he can step up in weight and not lose his quickness or power, making him one of the toughest fighters at 147. The other undisputed star at 147, and top pound for pound fighter in the world, is Floyd Mayweather Jr. Since the two are now in the same weight class, there’s no doubt they should fight to satisfy once and for all who is the best fighter in the world. But as you can tell Pacquiao is in no hurry to schedule a fight with Floyd where the negotiations would feature several roadblocks. Just listen to the Manny Pacquiao/Miguel Cotto post fight interview and skip ahead to the 1:05 mark to hear if Pacquiao has Floyd in his plans:

By the way, would somebody please tell A.C. Slater to take his finger out of his ear. And would somebody tell Slater that English isn’t Pacman’s primary language so it’s probably not a good idea to ask him 30 second questions with lots of big words. The guy just went 12 rounds with Miguel Cotto … give him a break, A.C.!