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Melky Cabrera’s home run broke windshield of truck parked behind Green Monster

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The Toronto Blue Jays put on quite the offensive display on Monday in Fenway Park against the Boston Red Sox.

By the end of the sixth inning, the Blue Jays had amassed 13 hits and 13 runs, including a nine-run outburst in the top of the sixth.

Among the Blue Jays who had a good day at the plate was left fielder Melky Cabrera, who hit two home runs. His first, of the two-run variety, came off of Red Sox starter Clay Buchholz in the first inning. Cabrera followed that up with the above pictured three-run shot for an encore in the sixth inning off of Felix Doubront.

As you can see, Cabrera’s second homer cleared the seats above the Green Monster. What we didn’t know, initially, was where it landed. As ESPN later showed, and the always reliable CJ Fogler captured, the baseball’s landing spot was a windshield.

Park behind the Green Monster at your own risk when Melky Cabrera is in town.

Anthony Bosch reportedly was running BALCO of the East, supplying A-Rod, Nelson Cruz, Gio Gonzalez, Melky, Colon

anthony bosch mugMiami New Times dropped a bombshell report on Tuesday in which they exposed Dr. Anthony Bosch (pictured) of running an anti-aging clinic that also doubled as a performance-enhancing drugs supplier to many athletes.

Bosch’s company, Biogenesis, sold PEDs ranging from HGH to steroids. Biogenesis’ client list reportedly included sluggers like Alex Rodriguez, Melky Cabrera, and Nelson Cruz, among others. Biogenesis operated on a similar scale to BALCO, the company formerly run by Victor Conte, that supplied drugs to athletes like Barry Bonds, Jason Giambi, and Marion Jones.

Miami New Times reports that Bosch has a history of racking up bad debts and stiffing ex-wives over support payments. His company reportedly was not paying employees. They would often supply patients (non-athletes) with steroid cycles and diuretics.

Miami New Times went through several documents and Bosch’s personal records to determine which athletes were mentioned and listed as customers. They found several baseball players, a boxer, and tennis player listed, many of whom have already been caught using PEDs.

The list includes:

    - New York Yankees DH/3B Alex Rodriguez, who admitted to past steroid use after being busted by Sports Illustrated in 2009.
    - Toronto Blue Jays outfielder Melky Cabrera, who was busted for using PEDs during a breakout 2012 season. His name appeared in Bosch’s records 14 times.
    - Oakland A’s pitcher Bartolo Colon, who tested positive for elevated levels of testosterone in 2012.
    - San Diego Padres catcher Yasmani Grandal, who was suspended in November for elevated levels of testosterone.
    - Tennis player Wayne Odesnik, who was caught transporting HGH across international borders and was suspended a year by the ITF.
    - Texas Rangers outfielder Nelson Cruz, who has belted 108 home runs in the last four seasons. He was mentioned in a July, 2012 customer sheet under the code name “Mohamad.”
    - Washington Nationals pitcher Gio Gonzalez, who won 21 games last season.
    - Boxer Yuriorkis Gamboa, who is 22-0,

As you read, the first five names listed have either tested positive in the past year, or have been busted in the past for PED use/association.

Bosch was also the doctor who prescribed Manny Ramirez HCG when he tested positive for the female fertility drug while with the Dodgers in 2009.

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Melky Cabrera will be removed from batting title race at his request

Melky Cabrera will be removed from the batting title race at his request despite leading the league, CSN Bay Area reports.

Cabrera currently leads the National League with a .346 batting average, which is 7 points higher than Andrew McCutchen and 11 points higher than teammate Buster Posey as of Friday. But Cabrera was suspended in August for 50 games after testing positive for performance-enhancing drugs. Cabrera’s suspension resulted in his .346 average being unchanged, leading to a debate about whether he should be eligible to win the title.

An agreement between the MLB players’ union and the league solved the issue.

According to CSN Bay Area, Cabrera’s reps sent a letter to MLB asking for their client to be removed from consideration. They also released a statement on behalf of their client in which Cabrera said he had “no wish to win an award that would be tainted,” and that he “believe[d] it would be far better for someone more deserving to win.”

“I am grateful that the Players Association and MLB were able to honor my request,” Cabrera said in a statement. “I know that changing the rules mid-season can present problems, and I thank the Players Association and MLB for finding a way to grant my request.”

Cabrera’s gesture was believed to be a move intended to rehab his image after his people were caught trying to create a fake website in order to cover up the positive drug test.

Brian Cashman on Melky Cabrera and Bartolo Colon suspensions: ‘Not surprised’

Melky Cabrera and Bartolo Colon have several things in common. For starters, both were born in the Dominican Republic. Both also played for the Yankees, and both have been suspended by the MLB for 50 games for testing positive for performance-enhancing drugs. Their former GM, Brian Cashman, spoke candidly about their suspensions on Tuesday.

“Unfortunately, not surprised,” the Yankees GM said on “The Michael Kay Show” when asked about the suspensions. “You see some spike in performance. You hope it’s not the case, but you scratch your head and you wonder at the same time. But then you sit there and get a comfort level: Tests are taking place, so if people are passing their tests …

“In Bartolo’s case, as well as he has done last year as well through this year, at his age, after coming back from that surgery, makes you scratch your head.”

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Melky Cabrera reportedly used fake website to try to cover positive drug test

In the span of about five days, Melky Cabrera has gone from one of the best all-around hitters in baseball to cheater and manipulator. As if the 50-game suspension Cabrera was given on Wednesday for testing positive for performance-enhancing drugs wasn’t enough, the story has gotten even more out of control.

According to a report from the NY Daily News, Cabrera and his camp created a fictitious website during the appeals process in an attempt to prove that he inadvertently took the banned substance that resulted in his positive drug test.

Cabrera associate Juan Nunez, described by the player’s agents, Seth and Sam Levinson, as a “paid consultant” of their firm but not an “employee,” is alleged to have paid $10,000 to acquire the phony website. The idea, apparently, was to lay a trail of digital breadcrumbs suggesting Cabrera had ordered a supplement that ended up causing the positive test, and to rely on a clause in the collectively bargained drug program that allows a player who has tested positive to attempt to prove he ingested a banned substance through no fault of his own.

“There was a product they said caused this positive,” one source familiar with the case said of Cabrera’s scheme. “Baseball figured out the ruse pretty quickly.”

An ugly situation for the 28-year-old just got much, much worse. Nunez told the NY Daily News on Saturday that he is “accepting responsibility” for the website and that Cabrera and his agents, Seth and Sam Levinson, were not involved with its creation in any way.

You know what they say — the only thing worse than a cheater is a cheater who creates a fake website in an attempt to prove that he wasn’t cheating.

Fist pound to Big League Stew

Kirk Gibson: MLB needs ‘much stronger’ penalties for failed drug tests

In the wake of Melky Cabrera’s 50-game suspension for elevated levels of testosterone, you can easily understand why some of the teams who have played against the Giants would be upset. As is the case with any player who used illegal performance-enhancing substances, the Giants technically cheated during the games in which Cabrera played. If the substance is helping the player pitch or hit more effectively, it is directly impacting the outcome of the game. Diamondbacks manager Kirk Gibson says the penalties need to be harsher for that reason.

“He’s had a huge impact against us,” Gibson said Wednesday according to the Arizona Republic. “And then you go back to 2008 with the Manny (Ramirez) thing. Huge impact. You compare like in the NCAA with Penn State. All those people are gone and Penn State is paying for it. Here it’s just tied to the individual. I think we need much stronger ramifications for that type of activity. It just absolutely cannot be tolerated.”

While there is no way to compensate the teams that were affected by Cabrera’s cheating, the penalty is fairly harsh. Gibson likely believes players should be suspended for a full year right off the bat, and I’m sure a number of people feel the same way. However, a 50-game suspension is extremely significant – especially at this point in the season. The Giants will now be without arguably their best hitter down the stretch and into the early part of the playoffs. The suspension could have an enormous impact on their team going forward, as it should.

H/T Eye on Baseball
Photo credit: Matt Kartozian-US PRESSWIRE

Melky Cabrera’s career year has been fueled by PEDs

How could a player like Melky Cabrera go from being an average outfielder to being the All-Star Game MVP? The answer is pretty simple: performance-enhancing drugs.

Cabrera tested positive for elevated levels of testosterone during or just before the All-Star break. He went through the appeals process but ultimately accepted his 50-game suspension on Wednesday for being a first-time violator.

Unlike most violators, Melky actually accepted responsibility for the failed test and apologized.

“My positive test was the result of my use of a substance I should not have used,” he said in a statement. “I accept my suspension under the Joint Drug Program and I will try to move on with my life. I am deeply sorry for my mistake and I apologize to my teammates, to the San Francisco Giants’ organization and to the fans for letting them down.”

The Giants are in the playoff race and have played 117 games this season. If they reach the playoffs, Melky would be suspended the first five games of the postseason. If they don’t, he’ll miss the first five games of the 2013 season.

There are a few really interesting side notes to this story, aside from the obvious suspicion this positive test casts on any player having abnormal success at the plate. One, the Giants likely knew Cabrera was facing a 50-game suspension, and that could be why they acquired Hunter Pence from Philadelphia. Two, Cabrera lied to CSN Bay Area writer Andrew Baggarly when the reporter approached him last month about a rumor that he failed a drug test. Baggarly wrote a long apology for asking Cabrera about the rumor, and he still feels that was the right thing to do. Maybe Cabrera should apologize to him for lying to him.

But the positive test further affirms what we already knew: players don’t magically go from being career .275 with an OPS below .750 to tearing up the league with a .346/.390/.516 line. It’s actually somewhat reassuring that he was popped for PEDs.