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Peyton Manning Disregards Criticism from Ron Jaworski

While many people are looking forward to the Monday Night Football game between the Colts and Texans to see if Arian Foster will set more franchise records against Indy’s defense, there’s another matchup about which I’m more excited. Seeing how ESPN analyst Ron Jaworski handles his commentary about Peyton Manning piques my interest.

A few weeks ago Jaws suggested in an interview that father time may have been catching up to Peyton. That was after the Chiefs’ defense had shut down Indy’s passing game and before Manning went for over 300 yards to beat the Redskins. After initially dismissing Jaws’ suggestion, I noticed Peyton lacked velocity on many of his throws against Washington though he had good stats.

The comments by Jaworski got back to Peyton for a response. The All-Pro shrugged off the comments and declined to get into things saying “I really have zero reaction.” Players take criticism of that nature personally and some hold it against broadcasters. Peyton will likely be out to prove to people — Jaws especially — that he is still an MVP quarterback and on top of his game.

What’s rare is to hear a game analyst like Jaworski be critical of a star player. Broadcast crews meet with teams and players prior to games in order to prepare for their telecast. To say the production meetings between Manning and Jaws were awkward is probably an understatement. I wouldn’t be surprised to hear Jaworski address his critical comments at some point during the game or go all out in praise of Peyton as an apology. Getting into conflicts like this one is exactly what keeps television personalities from being critical in their analysis.

Ron Jaworski Thinks Peyton Manning’s Skills May be Diminishing

The way he started off the season, I thought Peyton Manning was on his way towards winning a 4th MVP award. Peyton had 11 touchdowns against one interception through the first four games of the season (producing a 2-2 record). He still might bring home the hardware, but he’ll have to bounce back from a sluggish game last weekend against the Chiefs where the Colts won 19-9.

Manning obviously wasn’t sharp in the game, going 26-44 for 244 yards, a pick and no touchdowns, but his team pulled it out. ESPN analyst and former Eagles quarterback Ron Jaworski apparently has been studying some film on Manning and told Mike and Mike in the Morning that he thinks father time may be catching up with the quarterback.

Here’s what Jaws had to say, courtesy of Pro Football Talk: “The last couple weeks, as I’ve studied Peyton Manning, he has not been real sharp. Maybe there does come a time when the skills start to diminish a little bit. I’m not saying it is, but I’m seeing little signs now that the deep sideline throws are not as accurate as they used to be, there’s not the zip on the ball that there used to be. Maybe father time might be catching up with Peyton Manning a little bit.”

I really respect Jaws and find him to be extremely likable, but I saw Manning the entire game week two and most his game week four and he looked great to me. Jaws says he’s been watching the last couple weeks, and that would include the Jacksonville game where Peyton looked good. I honestly believe this is more of an overreaction to his off game against the Chiefs. Kansas City’s defense is greatly improved, and defensive coordinator Romeo Crennel had an extra week to prepare for this one. Manning may have missed some throws in the game, but I think it’s premature to say his skills may be diminishing at this point. Another MVP award wouldn’t surprise me for the Colts quarterback.

Collinsworth: Peyton Manning Is a Player-Coach for Colts

I’m sure many of us have thought to ourselves that coaching Peyton Manning is the sweetest gig in the world. The guy calls his own plays, makes audibles at the line, and is practically the team’s offensive coordinator. With Peyton doing everything, what the heck does a coach need to do?

Obviously people have a lot of respect for Tony Dungy. We saw the way he coached up Tampa Bay’s defense and later Indy’s D, so he’s earned our respect. But how many of you have wondered how good Jim Caldwell really is and what he really does? The guy had a career .292 winning percentage in eight years at Wake Forest. Jim Grobe has been a .575 coach since taking over for Caldwell. With those stats in mind, it’s not a stretch to think that Peyton Manning is running the Indianapolis show.

Count NBC broadcaster Cris Collinsworth as one who believes that is the case. To make things clear, Collinsworth was simply praising Manning on Sunday Night Football rather than bashing Caldwell, but after hearing his description of Peyton as a coach on the field, it does make you wonder who is the brains behind the Colts’ operation. Here’s what Collinsworth had to say:

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Brady vs. Manning: Who Deserves the Bigger Payday?

If Robert Kraft follows through on what he has been saying, Tom Brady will remain a New England Patriot beyond the 2010 NFL season.  If Colts owner Jim Irsay can put his plan of making Peyton Manning the highest-paid player in football into action, Manning will be staying put as well.  For the sake of this discussion, we’ll assume the option of either quarterback skipping town is out of the question.  With that in mind, who should be offered the more lucrative contract when they inevitably ink their new long-term extensions?

In order to determine which franchise quarterback deserves a bigger payday, we’ve pitted the two against one another in five categories: statistics, playoff performance, durability, hardware, and MVP factor.  Let’s see how they match up:

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Colts Owner: We’ll Franchise Tag Manning If We Have to

At a time when members of the mainstream media are abuzz with talk of new labor agreements and star quarterbacks whose contracts are expiring after this season, I’m a little surprised to hear Indianapolis Colts Owner Jim Irsay admit that he would use the franchise tag on Peyton Manning if it came down to it.  It’s uncertain if there will even be such a thing as a franchise tag when a new labor agreement is reached, but apparently Irsay won’t be afraid to use it if there is.  Here’s what the Colts owner told the Associated Press, courtesy of Pro Football Talk:

The bottom line is we’ll get something done and when it happens just depends,” Irsay said, per the Associated Press. “I said he’d be the highest-paid player and he may already be if we go with the [franchise] tag.  I’d love to see him be here and break all those records as a Colt.”

While I’ve already said I think too much is being made of QB contract situations and I don’t think any of the game’s best quarterbacks are changing teams, I don’t think guys like Peyton Manning, Tom Brady, and Drew Brees want to be franchise tagged.  Irsay has openly stated he plans on making Manning the highest-paid player in the NFL, but I’m sure Manning would prefer a deal to get done before use of the franchise tag is necessary.  If it still exists, the tag would give him a one-year contract worth $18.96 million, which isn’t exactly petty cash.  However, it doesn’t provide the long-term security that a Super Bowl champion has earned.

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Too Much Being Made of NFL QB Contract Extensions

Members of the media obviously need something to talk about while the world of professional sports is amidst its most boring season. I understand they have a job to do and it can be frustrating when there are no major headlines for an extended period of time. However, the lack of exciting story lines can lead to some serious overreacting, which is what has happened this NFL off-season with the uncertainty surrounding the contract situations of the league’s elite quarterbacks.

When I woke up Monday morning and read that ESPN’s Adam Schefter was reporting that Tom Brady‘s contract discussions with the New England Patriots were progressing, why was I surprised? Maybe it’s because the word “holdout” has been the most closely connected word to Brady’s name, despite the fact that he never said anything about — or even hinted at — the possibility that he would stay home when training camp began. The three-time Super Bowl champ may be building a home in L.A., enjoy boxing there, and be friendly with Kobe Bryant, but he’s not leaving New England.

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Greatest Quarterbacks of All-Time Don’t Throw Pick Sixes to End the Super Bowl

A ton of talk leading up to the Super Bowl was about Peyton Manning’s place in history. Many people were starting to talk about him being the best QB of all-time. After he shredded the Jets — the top defense in the league — Rex Ryan and others lavished Peyton with endless praise. People were saying that there wasn’t anything you could throw at Manning defensively that he hadn’t already seen. People said that Manning prepares better than any other player and that defenses can’t confuse him. Many people suggested that he was poised to become the best quarterback of all-time. While I recognize the greatness of Peyton Manning — supreme consistency, excellent stats, an uncanny ability to run the two-minute drill and lead his team to comeback wins — he’s only been average (by his standards) in the postseason, and that’s a major concern.

In recent years, Manning’s Colts have lost in the postseason to the Chargers twice. Previously, they couldn’t get past the Patriots when they had to play in Foxborough. There are two undeniable truths to take from those facts: one, Manning’s success in the passing game is related to the weather, and two, the Colts have a tendency to lose to inferior teams in the playoffs. Additionally, a problem that plagued Manning early in his career reemerged in the Super Bowl. Peyton used to throw a lot of pick-sixes (28 interceptions his rookie year, 23 his fourth season) and that had a large role in the eventual resignation of Jim Mora as Indy’s head coach. It also came back at the most inopportune time for Indianapolis.

I’m not saying Peyton Manning isn’t a great quarterback and that I wouldn’t love to have him as my franchise’s quarterback; that’s not the issue. What I’m saying is that the greatest quarterback of all-time doesn’t throw a pick six to end his team’s chances at winning a Super Bowl. What I’m saying is that Peyton’s alleged invincibility does not exist. Apparently defenses can get to Peyton with pressure and apparently they can confuse him with different looks. If that weren’t the case, then how did Tracy Porter know the play was coming and how did he bait Manning into that throw? If Peyton Manning is the most well-prepared player in the league, then how is it that extensive film study led Porter to make the game-clinching play over Manning? And I’m sick of hearing people blame Reggie Wayne for the interception; did he make the throw? Did he decide to run a play the defense knew was coming? I thought Peyton Manning was a coach on the field and Indy’s offensive coordinator? If that’s the case, then he made a bad call. Peyton Manning is an outstanding quarterback but he’s still a notch below Tom Brady in my eyes, and possibly on an equal level with Drew Brees now. The greatest quarterback of all-time doesn’t make that throw.

By the way, even Tony Dungy admitted on Dan Patrick’s show that the throw would hurt Peyton’s legacy: “Those are the situations where you expect the great quarterbacks to make the play and to go down and win it. I was sitting there expecting that they were going to go in and tie it up. One throw a lot of times can impact a legacy.” No doubt about it.