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Logan Morrison had a classic reaction to Ryan Braun’s suspension

logan-morrisonMiami Marlins first baseman Logan Morrison is one of the funnier players in baseball. The 25-year-old is one of the best players to follow on Twitter because of some of the comments he comes out with. After Ryan Braun was suspended for the remainder of the season on Monday because of his involvement with the Biogenesis scandal, Morrison took a shot at his own team.

“You know we’re clean,” he said, via the Miami Herald’s Clark Spencer. “We haven’t scored a run in 37 innings.”

Classic. Fortunately for Miami, the streak ended at 37 as they scored two runs in the first inning of a 3-1 win over the Colorado Rockies on Monday night. While a 37-inning scoring drought doesn’t necessarily mean no one on the Marlins has used performance-enhancing drugs, it certainly makes them less suspect.

Braun has immediately become a punching bag for the entire sports world because of all the gutless lies he told about using steroids and all the people he attacked in an attempt to clear his name. Morrison didn’t have to remind us that the Marlins are awful when providing his thoughts about Braun, but he’s obviously frustrated with the way the season he’s gone. We’re glad he chose to express it the way he did.

H/T Eye on Baseball

Aaron Rodgers bet a year’s salary that Ryan Braun was innocent

Aaron Rodgers Ryan BraunWhen Ryan Braun was first implicated for failing a drug test during his MVP season for the Milwaukee Brewers, nobody defended him in public more firmly than Aaron Rodgers. The two are around the same age, from California, and they’re both star athletes for Wisconsin teams. They became very close friends and even opened a restaurant together.

The Green Bay Packers quarterback lashed out against the person who leaked the news of Braun’s failed test, saying there should be more confidentiality. Then, when Braun won his appeal for the positive test, Rodgers celebrated over Twitter and told MLB to eat crow.

At the time, we pointed out that Rodgers’ celebration was premature; winning the appeal never meant that Braun was innocent, nor did it explain how his test had elevated levels of testosterone. That didn’t stop Rodgers from boasting about Braun being exonerated. He even told a Twitter user he’d “put my salary on it next year” that Braun didn’t use PEDs:

Aaron Rodgers Ryan Braun bet

Even though Rodgers looks like a dope right now and it’s easy to point and laugh at him because he was wrong, I feel badly. How hurt and disappointed do you think he is to learn that Braun lied to him this whole time and really was cheating?

H/T World of Isaac

Here are all the lies Ryan Braun told about his PED use

Ryan Braun press conferenceRyan Braun accepted a 65-game suspension from MLB for his ties to Biogenesis, which allegedly provided several athletes with performance-enhancing drugs. People are pretty upset over the suspension not just because we are learning that the accomplishments of a former MVP were tainted, but because Braun so fiercely denied guilt over the past year and a half.

Braun tested positive for elevated levels of testosterone during his MVP season in 2011. He escaped suspension for the positive test because of an error in the collection process of his urine sample. After winning his appeal on the technicality, Braun attacked the testing process, labeled himself a victim, and proclaimed his innocence.

Let’s recall some of the things Braun said during his Feb. 24, 2012 press conference (seen above). As we would learn 17 months later, Braun knew he was guilty the entire time and still made these statements.

“I tried to handle the whole situation with honor, with integrity, with class, with dignity and with professionalism because that’s who I am and how I lived my life.

“I would bet my life that this substance never entered my body at any point.

“I have always stood up for what is right. Today is about everybody who has ever been wrongly accused and everybody who has ever had to stand up for what is actually right.

“I will continue to take the high road because that’s who I am and that’s the way that I’ve lived my life. We won because the truth was on my side. The truth is always relevant and, at the end of the day, the truth prevailed.

“I am a victim of a process that completely broke down and failed in a way that it applied to me in this case.

“The system in the way that it was applied to me in this case was fatally flawed.”

That’s pretty bad, but it gets worse.

Ryan Braun issued this statement on Feb. 5, 2013 in response to being listed in Biogenesis documents:

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Ryan Braun suspended for rest of season, admits wrongdoing

Ryan BraunRyan Braun has been suspended for the rest of the MLB season for his connection to the Biogenesis clinic that allegedly provided performance-enhancing drugs to several athletes. Braun has repeatedly denied using performance-enhancing drugs despite evidence to the contrary. Braun tested positive for elevated levels of testosterone during his MVP season in 2011. He escaped a 50-game suspension as a first-time offender of the MLB’s drug policy because his attorneys found an error with the collection process. Braun also explained his name appearing in the personal notes of Biogenesis founder Tony Bosch by saying his lawyers consulted Bosch when appealing his positive drug test.

After all the denials, Braun accepted his punishment from MLB and admitted wrongdoing in a statement. Here’s Braun’s statement via the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel:

“As I have acknowledged in the past, I am not perfect. I realize now that I have made some mistakes. I am willing to accept the consequences of those actions. This situation has taken a toll on me and my entire family, and it is has been a distraction to my teammates and the Brewers organization. I am very grateful for the support I have received from players, ownership and the fans in Milwaukee and around the country. Finally, I wish to apologize to anyone I may have disappointed – all of the baseball fans especially those in Milwaukee, the great Brewers organization, and my teammates. I am glad to have this matter behind me once and for all, and I cannot wait to get back to the game I love.”

MLB must have presented Braun with overwhelming evidence for him to admit wrongdoing after over a year of denials. He also must have agreed to a 65-game suspension as a compromise with MLB (50 games are called for with a first violation, 100 games for a second).

[Related: All the lies Ryan Braun told about his PED use]

“We commend Ryan Braun for taking responsibility for his past actions,” said Rob Manfred, Executive Vice President, Economics & League Affairs for Major League Baseball. “We all agree that it is in the best interests of the game to resolve this matter. When Ryan returns, we look forward to him making positive contributions to Major League Baseball, both on and off the field.”

Braun is earning $8.5 million this season, so the suspension will cost him about $3.4 million. It’s quite amazing that he has finally admitted wrongdoing after over a year of denials. He probably should have also apologized for lying the whole time.

Braun’s admission of wrongdoing also spells bad news for Alex Rodriguez and every other player tied to the scandal. That likely means all the evidence MLB has is credible.

Ryan Braun reportedly would not answer questions about Biogenesis

Ryan BraunMLB plans to suspend Ryan Braun, Alex Rodriguez, and as many as 20 other players soon after the All-Star break because of their ties to Biogenesis, ESPN’s Outside the Lines reports.

Tony Bosch, who ran the Biogenesis clinic, cut a deal with MLB last month to provide information which helped them build their cases against the players in question.

One reason Braun could be facing a lengthy suspension is because he would not answer questions about his relationship with Biogenesis or Bosch during a June 29 meeting with MLB, per Outside the Lines.

Braun has repeatedly denied using performance-enhancing drugs despite failing a drug test in 2011 and appearing in the Biogenesis records.

Braun’s 50-game suspension for the positive test was overturned after he won his appeal because the tester did not follow proper protocol when handling the sample. Braun also said he was listed in Bosch’s notes because his lawyers used Bosch as a consultant during his appeal.

Braun continues to avoid the subject matter. He said through a club spokesperson that he will not address the Biogenesis issue with reporters.

Anthony Bosch reportedly cuts deal with MLB after Alex Rodriguez refuses to pay

Anthony-Bosch-mugshotMajor League Baseball is reportedly in the process of cutting a deal with Anthony Bosch that could result in a hefty suspension for Alex Rodriguez, Ryan Braun and nearly two dozen other MLB players. Back in April, the New York Times reported that MLB had paid some former Biogenesis employees for documents related to the case. Now, it appears they are working closely with the man in charge of the clinic as well.

According to the NY Daily News, Bosch recently asked Rodriguez for financial help and the Yankees’ slugger refused his request for money. As a result, Bosch has agreed to cooperate with MLB in its ongoing investigation. If the league did not strike a deal with him, the concern was that Bosch might turn to players for money and cover up the case.

“They were afraid someone else would pay him,” a source reportedly told the NY Daily News. “Bosch is the only guy that can provide them with what they need.”

Bosch and his lawyer, Susy Ribero-Ayala, allegedly informed MLB that they are willing to provide “damaging information” about Bosch’s past dealings with A-Rod and Braun. Braun is believed to have worked with Bosch as far back as his days playing college baseball at Miami.

In order to get Bosch to cooperate, MLB has had to really sweeten the pot. The Daily News reports that the league has agreed to drop the lawsuit it filed against him earlier in the year, pay his legal bills, protect him from any civil liability that might arise and provide him with personal security. Officials also say MLB will intervene if any law enforcement officials come after Bosch for admitting he supplied players with performance-enhancing drugs.

The obvious question is this: what if Bosch lies? What if he simply says he treated A-Rod, Braun and dozens of others because he likes the deal MLB is offering? NY Daily News legal analyst Tom Harvey insists it won’t be that simple and that the league had little choice.

“Put yourself in their position,” Harvey said. “You ask the witness to help you and he says, ‘Why would I do that? I’m going to get burned if I do, sued, the works.’ In light of what some of these athletes have done in the past with lawsuits and threats, including Lance Armstrong and Roger Clemens, why wouldn’t you want to be indemnified? Defending that lawsuit could cost hundreds of thousands of dollars.”

Bosch feels that he has been “falsely accused” and has done nothing wrong. His decision to cooperate with MLB could spell bad news and an end to the season for Rodriguez, Braun and others.

100-game suspensions for A-Rod and Ryan Braun? MLB is on a rampage

Ryan BraunMLB is looking to suspend around 20 players for their alleged involvement with Biogenesis, a now-defunct anti-aging clinic run by quack Tony Bosch that allegedly doubled as a supplier of performance-enhancing drugs to several athletes, ESPN reports.

The most jaw-dropping item in the ESPN “Outside the Lines” report is that MLB might seek 100-game suspensions for former MVPs Alex Rodriguez and Ryan Braun, which is the penalty for a second doping offense. According to ESPN, MLB will consider the players’ connection to Bosch a first offense, and the players denying involvement with Biogenesis in statements to MLB a second offense.

ESPN says Bosch is broke, living with friends and/or family, and fearful of facing charges from the federal government. Though in the past Bosch denied association with athletes, he reportedly is now prepared to talk to MLB because he supposedly believes cooperating with them is his only option. MLB would also be cutting him a sweet deal.

ESPN states in its report:

In exchange for Bosch’s full cooperation, sources said, Major League Baseball will drop the lawsuit it filed against Bosch in March, indemnify him for any liability arising from his cooperation, provide personal security for him and even put in a good word with any law enforcement agency that might bring charges against him.

MLB is also looking for cooperation from two other former Bosch employees so that they would have more documented statements and evidence against the players involved with the clinic.

Currently, ESPN has the names of 15 players who may face suspension. They say about 20 could face suspension. It’s possibly that the remaining players appear in Bosch’s notes under code names.

Based on the names of players we have, the teams who would be hit hardest by the potential suspensions include:

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