Quantcast

Bail jumper Jacob Close arrested after answering Redskins question for newspaper

Jacob-Close-criminal

If you have a warrant out for your arrest and are trying to avoid law enforcement, you definitely should not answer a question for a newspaper’s opinion column and agree to allow the paper to run your photograph. Jacob Close, a 25-year-old Bloomsburg (Penn.) University student, learned that the hard way over the weekend.

Close offered his opinion about a question related to the Washington Redskins name debate in the Bloomsburg Press Enterprise on June 30. He gave the following sarcastic thought in the publication’s weekly “Your Opinion” feature.

“I think they should keep the same name, but change the mascot to a potato.”

Close’s answer was pretty clever, but he should have saved some of that wit to help keep him out of jail. As it turns out, police have been looking for Close after he jumped bail in a drug and drunken driving case in Ithaca, New York years ago. Ithaca City Police were notified of his warrant in late May and had been looking for him for over a month.

After seeing Close’s photo in the Press Enterprise, a campus police officer staked out his car and arrested him at the student recreation center on Sunday. Close is now being held on $25,000 bail.

Aren’t dumb criminals the best?

H/T Jim Romenesko

Bad News Barrett calls Redskins ‘racist’ in Washington, D.C. (Video)

Bad-News-BarrettBad News Barrett played the role of classic WWE heel on Monday night in the nation’s capital. During the “Monday Night Raw” broadcast in Washington, D.C., Barrett taunted the audience about the Washington Redskins and their offensive nickname.

Before his match against Dolph Ziggler, Barrett referred to the Redskins as a “racist, constantly losing NFL team.” USA Today’s Nick Schwartz, who sat ringside at the Verizon Center on Monday, said most of the fans in attendance laughed.

As we saw with their Lance Stephenson spoof earlier this month, antagonizing fans about their home sports teams is one of the many ways the WWE stays relevant year-round.

US Patent Office cancels Washington Redskins’ trademark

Washington Redskins helmetIn a major development that could very well lead to the end of the Washington Redskins’ franchise name as we know it, the United States Patent and Trademark Office ruled on Wednesday that the Redskins’ federal trademark has been cancelled. The ruling was made on the ground that the team name is “disparaging to Native Americans.”

Travis Waldron of Think Progress first broke the news, noting that a name that is found to be disparaging, offensive or racist in nature cannot be trademarked under federal law. Amanda Blackhorse, who brought the motion against Pro-Football Inc., described the ruling as a “great victory” for Native Americans.

“I am extremely happy that the [Board] ruled in our favor,” Blackhorse said in a statement. “It is a great victory for Native Americans and for all Americans. We filed our petition eight years ago and it has been a tough battle ever since. I hope this ruling brings us a step closer to that inevitable day when the name of the Washington football team will be changed. The team’s name is racist and derogatory. I’ve said it before and I will say it again – if people wouldn’t dare call a Native American a ‘redskin’ because they know it is offensive, how can an NFL football team have this name?”

The Trademark Trial and Appeal Board’s full decision can be read here. Here are some of the most crucial findings.

[Read more...]

Anti-Redskins commercial to air during NBA Finals (Video)

Redskins-adA commercial that will lobby for the Washington Redskins to change their name is set to air in seven major cities during halftime of Game 3 of the NBA Finals on Tuesday night. The airtime was purchased by the Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation, a tribe based in California.

According to the Washington Post, the tribe called the ad a “significant investment” that was needed to further the discussion about the racist nature of the term “Redskins.”

The ad, which will air in Chicago, Dallas, Los Angeles, New York, Sacramento, San Francisco and Washington, will be a shortened version of the video you see above. It highlights a number of words that Native Americans are proud to be associated with and ends with the “one thing they don’t call themselves” before cutting to an image of a Redskins helmet.

Good luck fighting to keep that name, Dan Snyder.

Video via Deadspin

Redskins tell LaVar Arrington not to market himself as ‘Redskins great’

LaVar Arrington flier Redskins

Is there a sports franchise more caught up in petty and frivolous matters than the Washington Redskins? Here’s a team that has one of the more offensive nicknames in sports and refuses to change it, yet they go out of their way to make sure one of their franchise “greats” does not market himself that way. Seriously.

LaVar Arrington, who was a first-round pick by the team in 2000 and made three Pro Bowls during his brief injury-shortened career, tweeted Thursday night to say that he received a cease and desist letter from the team telling him not to use the moniker “Redskins great” or the team’s uniform on a flier for his football camp (seen above).

He then sent out a series of tweets about the laughing matter:

At least Arrington has a sense of humor about the matter. Too bad the Redskins don’t.

The irony in all this is as The Washington Post pointed out, Arrington was actually named one of the 80 greatest Redskins in franchise history back in 2012. The team gave him that honor.

Plus, does anyone really think that putting “Redskins” on the flier actually helps attendance? Gimme a break.

Photo: Twitter/LaVar Arrington

DeSean Jackson reportedly met with Robert Griffin III before Redskins visit

desean-jacksonThe Washington Redskins are considered a serious contender to sign DeSean Jackson. They are one of a number of teams who have expressed interest in the 27-year-old wide receiver since he was released by the Philadelphia Eagles, and we all know Daniel Snyder is never afraid to spend money. In fact, he may have even sent Robert Griffin III to do a little recruiting.

TMZ Sports is reporting that Jackson and RG3 hung out in Los Angeles over the weekend for “several hours” and that things went well. Jackson was scheduled to visit the Redskins on Monday.

According to ESPN Radio 980′s Chris Russell, Jackson does not intend to settle for a team-friendly deal in the wake of a troubling report about his alleged link to members of a gang. Jackson, a 2013 Pro Bowler, was scheduled to make $10.5 million with the Eagles in 2013 prior to his release. He is reportedly looking for an average annual value of $9 million to $10 million on the open market.

Again, Snyder is not afraid to spend. The Redskins have just under $7 million in cap space heading into 2014, whereas other potential Jackson suitors like the Buffalo Bills and Oakland Raiders have roughly $14 million. That said, money won’t be the reason Washington misses out on Jackson. If they want him bad enough, they’ll find a way to make it work.

Harry Reid: Redskins name will be changed within three years

Washington Redskins helmetThe Washington Redskins have found a new way to try convincing people that the name of their team is not racist in nature. The team announced earlier this week that it will be making a number of charitable contributions to Native Americans, including over 3,000 cold weather coats, sneakers for boys and girls basketball players and a backhoe for a tribe in Omaha.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid sees the new movement as a “phony deal” that is not going to help Daniel Snyder keep the Redskins name.

“Dan Snyder, he’s got a great new deal,” Reid told Dan Steinberg of DC Sports Bog on Thursday. “He’s going to throw a few blankets to the Indians and get a tax deduction for it. I can’t imagine why the man doesn’t realize that the name is going to change. It’s only a question of when it’s going to change. That’s the only question.”

Snyder has said in the past that the team will never changes its name, despite pressure from the mayor of Washington, D.C. and many others. Reid insists Snyder is on the “losing side of history,” citing similar issues like the University of North Dakota changing its Fighting Sioux nickname after Las Vegas multimillionaire Ralph Engelstad built the school a new hockey arena to try to convince them to keep the name.

“I think the name will be changed within the next three years,” Reid said. “You know, I may slip a year or two, but I think it’s just a question of time. Because Native Americans are organized. We have Native Americans who now are not all poor. We’ve got these Indian gaming establishments who have money, who are gonna help with this. And Dan Snyder’s not the only person in the world with money.”

Reid’s probably right. The issue is not going to go away no matter how much money Snyder throws at Native American tribes and organizations or how many letters Roger Goodell writes to Congress. Eventually, the pressure will become too great to overcome.