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Albert Haynesworth Isn’t Acting like a Team Player for Redskins

The Washington Redskins put together a good off-season, highlighted by acquiring quarterback Donovan McNabb, hiring Mike Shanahan as the team’s new head coach, and the changing defensive coordinators to Jim Haslett. Even though the additions look good, some players are unhappy that Jim Haslett will change the defense from a 4-3 to a 3-4. Albert Haynesworth is the player most upset, and he’s shown his unhappiness by not showing up for the team’s voluntary minicamp.

Haynesworth has missed two voluntary minicamps already and his teammates are upset he’s not been around. Redskins’ defensive end Phillip Daniels expressed his feelings on the matter to Mike Wise of The Washington Post:

“There is no room for negotiation at 4-12. I’m here, [London] Fletcher’s here, everybody’s here. He’s got to understand that. We need him to come here, be here and show these young guys that the veterans have bought in and that we want to win games. He should definitely be here. And it’s a shame he’s not.”

Haynesworth is acting unprofessionally and selfishly in my opinion. When you are part of a team, it isn’t about you being unhappy about the new defensive structure. He isn’t being paid $100 million to sit at home while the rest of his team learns their new formations. I know that this is a “voluntary” minicamp, but with all the changes that happened this off-season for the Redskins, it only seems logical for everyone to show up. Haynesworth has such a big impact on this defense that if he’s not willing to carry his weight in all of this, we are going to see a defensive mess for the Redskins come September.

Sources:
Teammates to Albert Haynesworth: You should be at Redskins Park [The Washington Post]

Looks Like Jason Campbell Has Finally Had Enough of the Redskins Bull****

A few weeks ago on my radio show (which I probably don’t mention enough here, yes, it’s every Friday overnight 11pm-4am PT available at sportingnews.com or 1090am for the So Cal crowd), I made a point of comparing Jason Campbell’s reaction to trade rumors with Jay Cutler’s reaction to the same rumors. While Cutler used the Cassel to the Broncos rumors as leverage to demand a trade, Campbell reacted to the Cutler/Redskins rumors in a mature way. Campbell publicly showed he knows it’s a business, saying that any team that didn’t win the Super Bowl the previous year will be looking to improve the following season.

While Campbell was justifying the Skins’ interest in Cutler, there’s no doubt he was hurt. The guy was the team’s first round pick a few years ago, waited his time, finally got his shot, and felt like they had committed to him as their starter. Now he’s hearing nothing but rumors that they’re trying to upgrade at the position? That they view their quarterback as a weakness? Of course he couldn’t have felt good about everything. The final straw may have been the rumors that Washington’s interested in drafting Mark Sanchez (quick plug, I’m hosting the SNR post-draft show Sat. night 7-10pm PT too if you can listen). That’s not sitting well with Campbell, apparently:

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Radio’s so Easy, Team Vice Presidents Can Do it!

Ever power-tripping Redskins owner Daniel Snyder likes to have so much control of everything around him that he recently bought WTEM, the most powerful sports talk radio station in Washington D.C. Snyder changed it around and turned it into ESPN 980, ostensibly to control the perception of his team and hamper the criticism. That still hasn’t stopped local icon host Steve Czaban from taking Snyder to task, despite remaining as a host on 980. Well Snyder sure is taking some lengths to make the station more Redskins friendly, handing the team’s Vice President of Football Operations, Vinny Cerato, a two hour show twice a week.

Some of the hosts at the station think the whole idea is a joke and have already expressed their thoughts on the matter. Cerrato seems to be pretty pumped about the opportunity to reach out to the fans. As for me, though I know it’s not uncommon for team employees to host a weekly show, I can’t help but think this is a way for Snyder to attempt to control the media. If he wants open lines of communication to the team, there are many other ways to achieve it with the fans. Why not just have a one hour show a week instead of two hours twice a week? Do the radio hosts get a chance to act as team vice presidents a few days a week, too? Seems like an awful lot of time for a person with a seemingly important job title to be giving up to chat on the radio … just my opinion.

Daniel Snyder Must Be One Big Turnoff

Daniel Snyder: friend to the assistant coach. He could be the best thing that’s ever happened to NFL assistants everywhere. Much like everyone used the Arkansas gig to leverage better deals with their current schools (see Tommy Tuberville, Butch Davis, and Tommy Bowden), everyone’s using Daniel Snyder and the Redskins to leverage better NFL jobs.

What, just last week Jim Mora was interviewing with the Redskins for their head coaching position, spending the night at Snyder’s guest house. The former Falcons head coach was said to be a good candidate for the job. Well, nothing happened there, but three days ago it was announced that Mora would succeed Mike Holmgren as the next Seahawks head coach. Pretty sweet deal (though probably a portion of the announcement also had to do with him not taking any potential gigs at U-Dub). Then after interviewing Tuesday and Wednesday with Snyder, Giants defensive coordinator Steve Spagnuolo decided he would remain with New York and accept a new three-year contract to become the league’s highest paid defensive coordinator. And though he hasn’t yet received a new deal, Pete Carroll supposedly met with Snyder but nothing happened.

So what’s the deal here? How can all these people be meeting with Snyder, and at such lengths, only to not accept? The Skins seem like a good team, and the job seems somewhat desirable based on the talent currently on the roster. Maybe these candidates were using the negotiations as leverage and never intended to take the job. Or maybe, just maybe, they all get a bad impression from Dan Snyder. After all, the guy sounds like a huge prick according to one NFL coach.

Santana Moss Blames Todd Collins

I really haven’t seen this get much play, maybe because this was the most overlooked game of the weekend. After losing to the Seahawks 35-14 (fittingly by 21 points) and seeing his season come to an end, Santana Moss was answering questions for the media. It seemed pretty clear to me that he was hanging his quarterback Todd Collins out to dry with one of his remarks:

Collins finally had a pass land in the other team’s hands. When receiver Moss gave up on a route deep down the right sideline, Marcus Trufant easily hauled in the ball and returned it 78 yards for a score.

“I thought it was a dead play,” Moss said. “Then, all of a sudden I look up and the guy is catching it like a punt. You hate to be in a situation where the ball is coming and you don’t even know it.”

That changed the game from 21-14 with about five minutes left to 28-14, essentially giving it to Seattle. I can’t stand one teammate blaming another following a loss, much less when he’s the one who quit on a play. That’s like a double-negative, blaming a teammate and quitting on a play. I know you’re pissed your season just ended, but keep your mouth shut, Santana, and stop blaming others. Poor form Santana, poor form.

(Photo courtesy Otto Greule Jr., Getty Images)

Joe Gibbs Studied Under Chris Webber

In a weekend full of emotion, leave it to Joe Gibbs to have a brain fart. The Redskins lost to the Bills 17-16 on Sunday. I’m not saying that the loss is his fault — it certainly isn’t — but he made a glaring mistake at the end of the game.

Gibbs’ decision to call not one timeout to ice Bills kicker Rian Lindell from 51 yards out, but two, was enough to make a difference. Lindell knocked down a 36 yarder to win it for the Bills 17-16. Though you would expect a man with oh, I dunno, say 16 years of head coaching experience to be familiar with the league’s rule book, you could be wrong.

Gibbs asked the official nearest to him whether he could call a second timeout.

“I felt like he said, ‘Yes,’ ” Gibbs said. “He said, ‘When do you want to call it?’ But I’m not laying it on him. I’m the guy, in all likelihood, that made a decision that very, very easily cost us the game. I told the team that. I want to tell everybody that. I should know the rule. I can’t blame that on somebody else.”

Shoot, Joe Gibbs can call five timeouts if he wants to, but he’ll still get penalized. I just don’t get how a coach can be so unprepared. Sure, things happen in the heat of the moment, but come on, you don’t kick an extra point when you’re down two at the end of the game, right? I would think this is just as easy of a decision. Joe Gibbs, shame on you, even Chris Webber would be disappointed.

Sean Taylor Doubters Proved Wrong?

Sean Taylor Arrests

Four arrests were made in the Sean Taylor murder case Friday. That is a good thing, especially compared to the Darrent Williams case which is 11 months old and still unsolved in Denver. The police say they have at least one confession from the suspects, and potentially more to come. New information has come out, including the fact that two of the arrested men had ties to Taylor — one did household chores at the house, and the other had a relative dating Taylor’s sister. I still have a few issues here.

One of the main points the police department is making is that the suspects were strictly looking to rob Taylor, unaware Sean was even in the home. This is important because it separates the degree of murder for which they will be tried. Secondly, the police are still trying to figure out whether or not this incident was related to the break-in the previous week at Taylor’s home. It’s quite obvious that the suspects wouldn’t admit to either of the charges and make themselves look worse (no matter how dumb they are).

So if the information that was revealed late on Friday holds true, does that mean the people who blamed the death on Taylor’s sketchy past are wrong? It sure looks that way, though I won’t jump to any conclusions. Also, the four men are relatively young and do not have extensive, nor serious crimes on their records.  Connecting those dots, it seems quite possible that they were just there for money. I’m still left wondering though, who the heck left that knife behind?  How are the two not related?