Skip to main content
#pounditWednesday, April 17, 2024

Bob Melvin makes 1 notable policy change for Giants

Bob Melvin at a press conference

Bob Melvin has implemented a few changes heading into his first season as manager of the San Francisco Giants, and one will result in more players being on the field prior to first pitch.

Melvin is requiring every single person who could be in the dugout for a game to be on the field for the playing of the national anthem, according to Alex Simon of SFGate.com. That includes players, coaches, trainers and all staff members.

The policy has already been implemented during spring training, which we saw last weekend when NBC Sports Bay Area’s Alex Pavlovic shared a photo of the Giants filing back into the dugout after the anthem.

Melvin said earlier in the week that his anthem policy is more about being “ready to play” than making a political statement.

“It’s all about the perception that we’re out there ready to play. That’s it,” the manager explained, via Andrew Baggarly of The Athletic. “You want your team ready to play and I want the other team to notice it, too. It’s really as simple as that.”

Giants veterans have been very receptive to the policy, which represents a big change from the way things were done under former manager Gabe Kapler. Players were allowed to do whatever they felt was best for them during the national anthem when Kapler was in charge. Kapler himself even once made a political statement by choosing not to take the field for the anthem.

In addition to the anthem rule, Melvin is also requiring players to stay in the dugout for a certain number of innings during spring training games based on their service time. Those who are in their first major league spring training must remain in the dugout for the entire game.

The Giants have missed the playoffs the last two years and in six of their last seven seasons. Melvin, who enjoyed success with the Oakland A’s and San Diego Padres before taking the Giants job, clearly wants to change the culture in San Francisco.

Load more
Exit mobile version