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Friday, December 13, 2019

Aaron Rodgers

Aaron Rodgers details his complaints about ‘Game of Thrones’ ending

Aaron Rodgers

Aaron Rodgers appeared as an extra in the penultimate episode of “Game of Thrones,” the popular HBO show that ended its run on Sunday. Being part of the cast, though, did not stop Aaron Rodgers from airing a list of grievances about how the show ended.

On Tuesday, the Green Bay Packers quarterback shared them while also clarifying his appearance.

Rodgers, who is not the first athlete to cameo on the show, confirmed that he was neither the guy who was blown up in an explosion, nor the Lannister archer, as many believed. He mused that the guy who was running away and blown up in a scene was “not an athlete” and seemed insulted that people assumed that was his role in the show.

But he saved his greatest critique for the ending. Rodgers is not a fan of Bran ruling Westeros at the end of the show, and took 90 seconds to go through his view of the ending like he was breaking down an upcoming opponent. He rattled of a laundry list of characters who had a better story than Bran. Rodgers offered his preferred winner: Danaerys Targaryen.

“I loved the opportunity to be in the show, which most probably don’t think I was, but I was there. I love the show, but the writers were also doing Star Wars, so I think they might have been a little busy this last season,” Rodgers said in one final shot.

Sounds like someone does not want to be part of the upcoming comedy series detailing Bran’s reign over Westeros.

Packers coaches did not want to draft Aaron Rodgers

Aaron Rodgers

The Green Bay Packers’ decision to draft Aaron Rodgers with the No. 24 overall pick in the 2005 draft is one of the most important moves that shaped the NFL’s history over the past 15 years. The pick of Rodgers added a complicated element to the end of Brett Favre’s career and helped set the Packers up for more than a decade of winning, including a Super Bowl.

The story of how the pick went down is incredibly fascinating, and was shared by former Packers executive Andrew Brandt during an interview on “The Ask Gary Vee Show.”

According to Brandt, the Packers only had first-round grades on about 20 players that year. By the time their No. 24 pick came up, there was only one remaining player available for whom they had a first-round grade: Aaron Rodgers.

Brandt told Vee that the Packers’ coaching staff was begging them not to take Rodgers. The coaches felt they already had a quarterback on the roster in Brett Favre and badly wanted a player who would help them win now rather than take a guy who would be sitting on the bench. They wanted to stretch for a guy they had a second-round grade for.

The Packers were so unconvinced about taking Rodgers that they waited most of the 15 minutes they had before needing to make a selection to see if another team would come through with a trade offer. After getting no trade calls, they finally took Rodgers.

And guess what happened? Brandt says they could hear fans at the draft party in Lambeau Field booing the pick. On top of that, they got a phone call from Favre’s agent Bus Cook immediately asking them what the heck was going on.

The Rodgers pick led to an uncomfortable situation in Green Bay for three years before the Packers decided to finally move forward and turn things over to Rodgers for the 2008 season.

You can understand why things were so uncomfortable those first few years for the Packers, which also led to Favre slighting Rodgers at times. Time does help people forgive and forget, and the two quarterbacks have finally made amends.

As far as the pick, the Packers executives sticking to their draft board and going through with the Rodgers pick was the best thing they could have done. They got a Hall of Fame quarterback to follow a Hall of Fame quarterback, which is almost unprecedented.

You can listen/watch the story here, just beware of some curse words from Vee.

H/T Evan Silva

Davante Adams, ex-Packers WR defend Aaron Rodgers

Aaron Rodgers

Aaron Rodgers tried to defend himself on Monday over a bombshell story that painted him in a negative light, and some of his current and former teammates have begun doing the same.

Davante Adams, Rodgers’ favorite target in Green Bay, blasted Bleacher Report’s Tyler Dunne for speaking on a subject without gathering all the facts. In particular, Adams took exception to a claim from an anonymous source that Rodgers told rookie wide receiver Equanimeous St. Brown to run a different route from what former head coach Mike McCarthy called during a game last season. According to Dunne’s source, St. Brown had to tell a position coach he was “improvising” when the play didn’t work out because he didn’t want to throw Rodgers under the bus.

Rodgers said Monday that the play in question was a conversion route in which he and St. Brown were not on the same page. Adams says that is “100% accurate.”

“100% accurate. Thats what kills me man. Drag a HOF QB’s name thru the mud behind something you have zero clue about,” Adams wrote in a tweet. “New rule: Dont speak on shit unless u know all the facts. To whom it may concern….”

Adams drew an absurd 169 targets from Rodgers last season and has caught 35 touchdowns over the past three years, so you might think his opinion is a bit biased. However, former Packers wide receiver Jeff Janis, who was with the team from 2014-2017, defended both Rodgers and McCarthy and refuted the notion that he wound up in the quarterback’s “doghouse.”

Judging by the way he described the Bleacher Report article, it’s clear Rodgers feels it was designed to be a hit piece. While many of the sources may have had issues with him, it would not be a surprise if a lot of the information in the feature is accurate. There are two sides to every story, but both sides can have elements of truth within them. That is probably the case here.

Aaron Rodgers blasts Bleacher Report story as ‘smear attack’

Aaron Rodgers

Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers has come out strongly against a recent Bleacher Report story that painted a rather unflattering picture of both himself and former coach Mike McCarthy.

Appearing on ESPN Milwaukee on Monday, Rodgers called the story a “smear attack” consisting of anecdotes from “irrelevant, bitter players who all have an agenda.”

Rodgers denied specific aspects of the story as well, including an allegation that Packers CEO Mark Murphy told Rodgers “don’t be the problem” upon informing him of new coach Matt LaFleur’s hiring.

The Bleacher Report story was not flattering for Rodgers. One portion of it claimed that he consistently undermined McCarthy’s coaching, going as far as to force his wide receivers to choose between listening to him or the coach. Obviously, it’s in his best interest to shoot this stuff down as quickly as he can.

If Rodgers is telling the truth, it would seem he knows who’s behind the leaks. It may be worth dealing with that behind-the-scenes.

Report: Aaron Rodgers made WRs choose between listening to him or Mike McCarthy

Aaron Rodgers

The situation between Aaron Rodgers and Mike McCarthy in Green Bay last season got uglier than most people imagined, and it apparently had a significant negative impact on the development of some of the Packers’ young wide receivers.

In a lengthy feature that examines what went wrong in Green Bay leading up to McCarthy’s firing, Bleacher Report’s Tyler Dunne was told by numerous sources that Rodgers frequently undermined McCarthy’s coaching decisions and play-calls to the point where he made his receivers choose between listening to their quarterback or their head coach. One source close to the Packers estimated Rodgers changed about one of every three plays McCarthy called, and that put rookie receivers Equanimeous St. Brown and Marquez Valdes-Scantling in difficult spots.

On one play during a loss to the New England Patriots last season, Rodgers reportedly told St. Brown to run a post route when McCarthy called a flag. The play was unsuccessful, and St. Brown later had to tell a position coach he was “improvising” so he would not upset Rodgers by throwing him under the bus.

Other sources told Dunne that Rodgers would simply stop throwing to St. Brown and Valdes-Scantling when they made mistakes. When Valdes-Scantling began running the routes that were called from the sideline, Rodgers supposedly started freezing him out of the offense. Valdes-Scantling chalked it up to the MVP quarterback simply not liking him.

Regardless of what Rodgers said about his personal relationship with McCarthy, it seems clear that their working relationship became extremely toxic. Between Rodgers freezing out rookie receivers for listening to their coach over him and the opinion he reportedly held of McCarthy’s football IQ, it’s no surprise the Packers decided the coach-QB combo could no longer coexist.

Report: Aaron Rodgers was frustrated with Mike McCarthy’s ‘low football IQ’

Aaron Rodgers

Aaron Rodgers seemed genuinely distraught when the Green Bay Packers fired head coach Mike McCarthy last season, but there are more than a few reasons to believe the Pro Bowl quarterback was not sad to see him go.

In an explosive piece that provides an inside look at the relationship between Rodgers and McCarthy, Tyler Dunne of Bleacher Report spoke with sources who say Rodgers held a grudge against McCarthy for passing on him in favor of Alex Smith when McCarthy was the offensive coordinator with the San Francisco 49ers. Rodgers apparently also became frequently frustrated with McCarthy for what he perceived to be a lack of football knowledge from the coach.

“Mike has a low football IQ, and that used to always bother Aaron,” a source told Dunne. “He’d say Mike has one of the lowest IQs, if not the lowest IQ, of any coach he’s ever had.”

The same source said Rodgers used to call him regularly to vent about McCarthy frequently calling the wrong play and using plays that hardly ever worked in practice.

Former Packers running back Ryan Grant confirmed that Rodgers never fully got along with McCarthy, and that had a lot to do with McCarthy at one point thinking Smith was a better QB.

“Aaron’s always had a chip on his shoulder with Mike,” Grant said. “The guy who ended up becoming your coach passed on you when he had a chance. Aaron was upset that Mike passed on him — that Mike actually verbally said that Alex Smith was a better quarterback.”

Another longtime Packers player called the dynamic between Rodgers and McCarthy a “longtime cancer in the locker room.” A Green Bay personnel guy added that it is difficult for a quarterback who thinks he’s smarter than his coach to respect the coach.

Rodgers opened up about his relationship with McCarthy shortly after the coach was fired, and he made it seem like the two were close. Even if there was truth to that from a personal standpoint, the way Rodgers openly questioned Green Bay’s offensive approach and supposedly butted heads with McCarthy over play-calling said an awful lot. The latest just confirms what many already knew.

Astros OF Josh Reddick channels Aaron Rodgers in latest tweet

Josh Reddick Astros

Josh Reddick channeled Aaron Rodgers with a tweet he sent on Wednesday night.

Reddick’s Houston Astros were shutout by the Texas Rangers 4-0 to drop to 2-5 on the season. After the game, Reddick, who went 0-for-3 with two strikeouts in the loss, told fans it was early and that they needed to “chill.”

Rodgers famously told Green Bay Packers fans to R-E-L-A-X after a 1-2 start in the 2014 season. The team rallied to go 12-4 before losing in the conference championship game. He has since made similar comments to his fanbase.

Reddick knows the Astros have too much talent to be a 2-5 team and that they will turn things around. The main issue has been their offense; they’ve only scored more than two runs in a game once this season. Once they get everyone going, they’ll start winning games.