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Chris Singleton says it was either $10,000 on lottery tickets or blow it in the club

As you all know, last week’s Mega Millions jackpot sent everyone into a frenzy. Professional athletes did their part to contribute a solid chunk to the record-setting pot that climbed to a whopping $656 million. Three winning tickets were sold — none of which went to Chris Singleton, Matt Kemp, Michael Huff, or any other athlete who tweeted about the thousands they dropped on the lotto. Despite that, Singleton still believes the $10,000 he spent on Mega Millions tickets was a solid investment.

“Either that or blow it in the club,” Singleton said Monday according to the Washington Post.

And that’s the type of mindset that leads to the tragic tales of professional athletes blowing through their millions of dollars faster than a kid goes through his $15 allowance in a candy store. Singleton has plenty of money to blow, so saving the $10,000 wasn’t an option. At least if you buy lottery tickets you have some chance of turning it into more money.  Poppin’ bottles in the club isn’t exactly an investment. Seems like sound reasoning to me.

Photo credit: Jerome Miron-US PRESSWIRE

Even professional athletes are spending big bucks on Mega Millions lottery tickets

If there was one faction of society that wouldn’t be captivated by the $540 million Mega Millions lottery jackpot, you would figure it would be the elite earners, such as professional athletes. But even some of those millionaires are getting caught up in the lottery ticket craze.

SB Nation’s Andrew Sharp points out that a few athletes tweeted about buying thousands of dollars worth of tickets in hopes of striking it big. Wizards forward Chris Singleton is feeling the hype:


In case you think Singleton was joking, he tweeted several more thoughts about why it’s a good investment, saying “I’m dedicated to making more money.”

Raiders safety Michael Huff didn’t spend quite as much money, but he still threw down plenty of cash on the lottery:

Huff signed a $32 million contract including $16 million guaranteed and, as a former first-round NFL draft pick, he’s already made plenty of money. Singleton is a rookie making just under $1.5 million, so he’s less set financially. But these guys need to realize that the odds are about 1:176 million of winning the lottery, and even buying 10,000 tickets won’t improve your chances much.

Any wonder why so many professional athletes end up broke?

UPDATE: Even more athletes are getting in on the lottery ticket buying act.

Chest bump to Hot Clicks

A Beginner’s Guide to the 2011 NBA Draft: Profiles on All the Top Prospects

Reading NBA draft previews sometimes feels like wading through Princess Bride-style quicksand. With so many names to remember and stats to sift through, it can be hard to figure out what draft info is important and what’s just unnecessary nonsense.

Do you care as a casual fan, for instance, that Enes Kanter has 5.9% body fat? Or that Marcus Morris can run three quarters of the court in 3.2 seconds whereas his twin brother, Markieff, runs it in 3.4 seconds? Not really, right?

You just want the basics. Which is why I wrote this beginner’s guide.

Draft lunatics will already know most of what is written below. It’s not quantum physics, just a good starting place for people staring at the screen on draft night wondering “who is that guy?”

If you’re here for insight into Nikola Vucevic’s standing reach, you’ve come to the wrong place. But if cheat sheet info delivered in 100 words or less is your thing, I’m your guy. You won’t find any quicksand here.

Here’s my Cliff Notes-style guide to the 2011 NBA draft:

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