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Penn State Board of Trustees want to keep Joe Paterno statue

In a clear sign that the leadership and culture at Penn State University still needs a major overhaul, the Board of Trustees reportedly want the Joe Paterno statue next to the football field on campus to remain standing.

ESPN reports that the Board of Trustees have quietly committed to keeping the statue, and that they even hope it will remain that way forever. Their reasoning, according to Dan Van Natta Jr., is pretty sickening.

The trustees’ reluctance to remove the statue is motivated, in part, by a desire not to offend alumni and students who adore the late coach despite the damning findings of his role in the Jerry Sandusky child sexual abuse cover-up detailed in the Freeh report, the sources said. Some trustees also said in interviews they want to resist being pressured by the media into a sudden decision about such an emotionally charged issue.

This sounds to me like the school is still making poor decisions because of money. They don’t want to offend the alumni and students? It’s time for the school to admit wrongdoing and that Paterno was not a proper role model, which is part of what a statue signifies.

“You can’t let people stampede you into making a rash decision,” a trustee said. “The statue represents the good that Joe did. It doesn’t represent the bad that he did.”

According to Natta’s article, the Penn State trustees believe the public will eventually forget about the statue and that the issue will blow over.

“They don’t get to tell us,” a source told Natta regarding the public pressure. “This is a Penn State community decision.”

The trustees are preaching patience and remaining obstinate, but they need to understand that things have changed. Their “sweep it under the rug” mentality will no longer fly. Penn State is no longer operating in its own world where football rules and morals don’t matter. And I’m not advocating for the statue to be torn down because of reasons Bobby Bown provided. Oh no. It’s obvious that the pride related to the football program needs to be ripped from the school’s hands. They’re still morally corrupt by it, and tearing all their idols down is just the start to fixing the major problems.

And if you think I’m going overboard, watch this video by a recently elected Penn State trustee and tell me what you think.

Halo above Joe Paterno’s head removed from mural (Picture)

The artist who painted a mural of Joe Paterno on Heister Street in State College, Pa., decided to remove the halo that sat above the former Penn State football coach’s head, according to Onward State.

“Sadly, today is one of the hardest things that I’ve done,” artist Michael Pilato told passerbys on Saturday, Onward State reports. “I had to…I got rid of his halo.”

The halo was added after the coach’s death earlier this year.

“The reason I put halos on people is, when they pass away, it kind of reminds us that we have a short time here on Earth,” Pilato said.

Pilato and co-worker Yuriy Karabash decided the halo no longer fit.

A blue ribbon, which symbolizes support for child abuse victims, remains on Paterno’s jacket in the mural.

Many people have objected to former university president Graham Spanier’s presence on the mural. The Freeh report concluded that Spanier, former athletic director Tim Curley, former vice president Gary Schultz, and Joe Paterno, all worked to conceal the child sex abuse by Jerry Sandusky. Sandusky’s image was painted over in the mural last November after the Grand Jury’s findings were publicized.

Now that the halo has been removed from the mural, finally removing this from campus would be the next logical step for Penn State.

Below is a video of Pilato explaining why he got rid of the halo:

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Joe Paterno merchandise reportedly still in demand in State College

Despite the minefield of ugly findings made public Thursday after the Freeh investigation into the Penn State scandal, Joe Paterno merchandise continues to sit prominently in many State College, Pa., shops. And, if sales meant anything, they’d suggest that Paterno is still a popular and beloved figure in the Penn State community.

Here’s The Daily Collegian:

[T]oday in downtown State College, “JoePa” shirts hung on sale racks lining the sidewalks, cardboard cutouts stood in storefront windows and photographs of the former head coach running onto the field lined the walls of shops.

Despite controversy, many stores continue selling their stock of Joe Paterno merchandise. [...] Although a decrease in demand for Paterno merchandise could happen, some feel that there will still be a market for it in the future.

“We are going to continue selling Paterno merchandise as long as there is a demand for it and we continue seeing a demand for it,” one store manager said.

“Paterno is the legend here, a lot of people admire him and he was a very good coach and a great person,” one store owner added. “As long as [the artist] will make the pillows, we will sell them.”

Since the Freeh Report’s release, much debate has arisen on whether the university should remove the Paterno statue outside of Beaver Stadium. But how can Penn State expect the removal of the statue going over smoothly in the community if people are still buying frivolous T-shirts and pillows of the man?

H/T Sports by Brooks Live

Bobby Bowden: Joe Paterno statue should be removed

Bobby Bowden and Joe Paterno had an ongoing rivalry to see who could outlast the other to top the leaderboard for most wins in a coaching career. Bowden was forced out as head coach of Florida State in 2009 after the Seminoles became a mediocre team. Paterno refused to step down as coach at Penn State, allowing him to surpass Bowden.

In light of being peers and competitors, Bowden has been speaking about the Penn State scandal and has offered some harsh criticism of Paterno’s legacy. He told several radio programs, including Tom Krasniqi of WDAE, that Paterno’s statue should be removed from Penn State.

“If I was Joe Paterno’s family, I would want it taken down,” Bowden told Krasniqi. “Every time they play a game in that stadium, the cameras are going to flash down on that statue of Joe, and it’s going to bring up again this thing with Sandusky. To me, Penn State needs to get that behind them somehow. They gotta pay for the sins — that’s going to cost them a whole lot of money — but every time they see that statue, they’re going to bring that up. I’d hate for his family to have to go through that the rest of their lives.”

His characterization of Paterno’s legacy was equally harsh.

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Joe Paterno’s name to be removed from Nike Child Development Center

There will always be plenty of Joe Paterno supporters who believe the former Penn State coach did nothing wrong and was simply a victim of terrible circumstances. On Thursday, that group of people shrunk a bit when Freeh’s investigation concluded that Paterno was instrumental in covering up multiple instances of child sex abuse from assistant coach Jerry Sandusky. The backlash began almost instantly, including Nike’s decision to remove Paterno’s name from the Joe Paterno Child Care Center in Portland.

“It appears Joe made missteps that led to heartbreaking consequences,” Nike founder Phil Knight said. “I missed that Joe missed it, and I am extremely saddened on this day. My love for Joe and his family remains.”

Despite ESPN analysts and idiotic NFL receivers still defending his legacy, there’s no denying this changes things drastically for JoePa. It’s hard to argue that what he did for the lives of many young football players isn’t overshadowed by what he didn’t do for the lives of innocent young children.

Photo via Shutdown Corner

Kirk Herbstreit still defending Joe Paterno’s legacy

ESPN college football analyst Kirk Herbstreit spoke about Joe Paterno’s legacy on Thursday and showed little understanding about the significance of the Freeh commission’s findings.

Herbstreit, a former Ohio State quarterback, was one of the few people who used his platform on ESPN to defend Joe Paterno the day the late coach was exposed for covering up years of Jerry Sandusky’s pedophilia.

“Obviously I think a lot of us in the college football world are stunned by the details of the report,” Herbstreit said. “I think it’s very easy to sit here today and look at all the things that Joe Paterno did not do, and clearly that’s going to have a major, major impact on his legacy.

“At the same time, there are so many former Penn State players that I’ve met over the last 15 or 20 years. If there’s one school that I’m always impressed with their alumni and always impressed with the guys who played football for Joe Paterno, of all the universities out there, the one school that I would say that seems to be a step above everybody else, it’s the Penn State players. And Joe Paterno had a lot to do with how those guys went through that program and how they turned out to be. I think to completely turn away from that is doing his legacy an injustice.”

Famed college football announcer Brent Musburger was too disgusted by the report’s findings to discuss Paterno’s legacy. Mark May, another ESPN college football analyst, termed Paterno as “morally culpable” as Jerry Sandusky. Herbstreit sung a different tune.

“This is going to have a long-term effect. People are talking about bringing down the statue, Nike’s already stepped up and they’re going to take his name off of what they’ve done out there, so it’s going to have a big impact. But at the same time,” Herbstreit said, “I’m also going to choose to remember some of the good that he did, and the lives that he touched of young men that went through his program.”

Herbstreit was then asked how the findings would impact Penn State’s football program moving forward. I guess they missed the big message that Penn State’s problem was prioritizing football over everything else.

As for a response to Herbstreit, Paterno may have positively impacted many lives, but how much is that worth when compared to the lives of innocent children he severely damaged because he wanted to protect his football program? Not much to me. For an extremely well written piece on Paterno’s damaged legacy, read this brilliant column by Yahoo!’s Dan Wetzel.

Scott Paterno, Jay Paterno still denying the truth about father Joe’s cover-up

The Freeh investigation into the events surrounding Jerry Sandusky’s child sexual abuse concluded that Joe Paterno knew about the 1998 shower incident and that he was instrumental in administering a cover-up of Sandusky’s crimes. The commission’s most incriminating evidence against Joe Paterno comes from information found in two emails.

A 1998 email from Tim Curley to Gary Schultz said Paterno was “anxious to know” where the investigation stood. A 2001 email from Curley to Schultz said Curley no longer wanted to confront Sandusky about the shower incident McQueary witnessed after “talking it over with Joe (Paterno).”

That hard evidence has been lost on Paterno’s sons Scott and Joe.

“I honestly believe that it [sic] a situation where people who thought they were doing the right thing made mistakes,” Scott Paterno told The Patriot-News. “I know my father did not know Jerry was a pedophile and did not suspect he was a pedophile. Everything I saw in the Freeh commission report supports that. He reported what he saw in 2001, and the 1998 case was investigated.”

Scott omits the information from the email that says Curley decided not to address Sandusky’s 2001 anal rape of a child after “talking it over with Joe.”

Meanwhile, Jay Paterno, a former Penn State coach, came off looking even worse during an interview on SportsCenter. He did his best to poke holes in the Freeh report but instead came off looking like a liar and man in denial.

“This is not a legal document in any way,” Jay Paterno said. “This has a much lower bar and burden of proof. It’s really an opinion. There are no new facts in here, just some new interpretations of things.”

Apparently Jay doesn’t consider inside emails to be facts, unless he believes they were fabricated by the commission. But that wasn’t all he offered.

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