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Rays P Joel Peralta injured his neck while getting out of car on a sandwich stop

Joel-Peralta-RaysAnother day, another MLB pitcher sidelined because of a bizarre injury. Tampa Bay Rays pitcher Joel Peralta is the latest victim of what is becoming a recurring theme with spring training now underway. Peralta is going to be sidelined for a short while with a neck injury, and you’ll never guess how he hurt it. Actually, you probably can guess with the way things have been going.

According to Mark Topkin of the Tampa Bay Times (via ESPN’s Jayson Stark), the 36-year-old right-hander tweaked his neck while stopping off to grab a sandwich.

He was still able to get the sandwiches. Roger Mooney of The Tampa Tribune added that it was a Camaro that Peralta was getting out of, so you can understand how climbing out of a low vehicle like that may be a challenge for someone who will be 37 next month.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: these guys need a plastic bubble. Pitchers and catchers just reported to camp this week, and we have already had pitchers suffer significant injuries while playing with their children and shoveling out their driveway. Fortunately, Peralta’s injury is not believed to be serious and he is not expected to miss much time. That being said, it is only Feb. 13. There’s no telling what the next two months will bring. Fingers crossed.

Joel Peralta ejected for pine tar on his glove, and Joe Maddon is ticked (Video)

Rays reliever Joel Peralta was ejected in the top of the 8th inning of the team’s game against the Nationals on Tuesday night after umpires found significant amounts of pine tar in his glove. The umpire inspection was requested by the Nationals, which knew of Peralta’s habits from his team with the team in 2010.

Even though Peralta was caught blatantly cheating, Rays manager Joe Maddon was ticked off after the game and called Washington’s decision to request a check “cowardly.”

“Insider trading, man. It’s bush,” Maddon said. “It’s bogus. That’s way too easy, right there.”

Maddon’s argument is that cheating is commonplace, and that managers shouldn’t bust opposing players for doing the same thing their guys are doing.

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