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Rob Dibble: Pirates Players Wanted Reds to Throw at Barry Bonds

Back before Barry Bonds was America’s enemy as #25 for the San Francisco Giants, he was a skinny two-time All-Star for the Pittsburgh Pirates who could steal 50 bases in a season. Not many people remember that Barry because his greatest years came so late in his career, but that’s who he played for before he got on the horse pills.

Anyway, on this week’s Barfly edition of FOXSports.com’s Lunch with Benefits, host Mark Kriegel talked about Bonds with guests Kevin Frazier and Rob Dibble. Frazier was comparing Bonds’ friendliness during his playing days with how he is now, and pointed out that Bonds is much friendlier these days. Dibble rebutted that with a story from his playing days of how Bonds’ teammates on the Pirates would come to him and Norm Charlton and offer a steak dinner if they hit Barry.

Dibble and Charlton were the Nasty Boys at the time, so getting hit with their fastballs actually meant something. Dibble says he never hit Bonds, but that just speaks to the way his teammates felt about him. Of course we’re not breaking any new ground here, just adding another anecdote to the long list of anti-Bonds tales.

Dibble also added that once A-Rod got his $252 million deal from the Rangers, that’s when players wanted to do what they could to extend their careers to continue earning money. Thanks to the Cincinnati Enquirer for the heads up on the story.

Rob Dibble’s Ichiro Ass Tattoo

On Thursday’s PM edition of Hot Clicks at SI, Jimmy Traina linked to a story about Nationals broadcasters Rob Dibble and Ray Knight getting into a disagreement on air. I thought the disagreement (regarding Stephen Strasburg’s two-strike pitches on Wednesday) was rather petty and exacerbated by Dibs. While that story was only semi-entertaining, it reminded me of an even better Rob Dibble story Jimmy linked to last year that I never before shared. This may be old, but it’s too damn good to pass up. Check out this transcription of an exchange between Dibble and Bob Carpenter during a Nats telecast last year:

Dibble: OK, you carry Ichiro’s initials around on your butt the rest of your life.

Carpenter: Wow.

Dibble: You never heard that bet that I lost?

Carpenter: No!

Dibble: Yeah, when he first came over here I was poppin’ off on another radio show about ‘Oh, he’s not gonna be good, blah blah blah, our pitchers are gonna be better than him.’ And he went out and got 242 hits, hit .350, won the batting crown, was Rookie of the Year. So, I lost the bet and now I have Ichiro’s name and number tattooed on my butt in Japanese. And I had to run around Times Square in a g-string.

You should do yourself a favor and read the entire exchange because it’s pretty priceless. Doing some research prior to writing this post, I also came across this old article written by Dibble back when he was with ESPN and it really gives you a good idea of how inferior he felt Japanese ballplayers were at the time. Now that I think about it, the success of several Japanese players in MLB really has destroyed that notion, thanks mostly to Ichiro’s efforts which have been immortalized on Dibble’s butt. For the record, this Arizona fan is not impressed.