Quantcast

Mike Napoli, More Than Vernon Wells, May Have Cost Tony Reagins His Job

Tony Reagins is out as the general manager of the Angels after taking over the position in October, 2007. What’s sad, is that much like his predecessor, Bill Stoneman, Angels fans are celebrating the news of his demotion. Fans never want to celebrate the firing of a front office executive because that generally correlates to the team performing poorly. That was the case for the Angels, who missed the playoffs two straight years for the first time during Arte Moreno’s tenure as team owner.

The baseball world first questioned Reagins’ sanity when he traded for Vernon Wells, who had perhaps the worst contract in the entire league. Taking a chance on the former All-Star may have been a worthwhile pursuit if the team were getting a discount, but Reagins unfathomably took on Wells’ contract without asking for any compensation in return.

Not only were the Angels stuck with the remaining four years and $84 million left on Vernon’s deal, but they also GAVE AWAY players in return. When Tony Reagins is getting robbed, he doesn’t just give the burglars what they want, he shows them the safe and hands them the combination, too. The Angels inexplicably gave Toronto Juan Rivera and Mike Napoli, a decision that in my opinion, cost Reagins his job.

[Read more...]

Baseball Has Become a Pitcher’s Game and the Mendoza Line May Need an Adjustment

Quick, someone alert Don Henley: it appears the boys of summer have gone. The worst part about it is that it isn’t even June yet. At some point over the last six weeks you probably can remember how one player or another made you crazy and remember how they made you scream. Go ahead. Take a look at any of the box scores from recent Major League Baseball games. I’ll wait. (It’s not like I have anything better to do at the moment.) Big name signings like Jayson Werth (.228), Adam Dunn (.184), Carl Crawford (.210), and Vernon Wells (.183) have suffered a greater fall than Humpty Dumpty. Even guys who have been traditionally strong hitters have struggled, like Albert Pujols (.268), Raul Ibanez (.231), Magglio Ordonez (.172), and Justin Morneau (.204), not including the San Diego Padres, who started five guys on Sunday afternoon hitting .245 or less. It may take more than the king’s horses and men (with a few million thrown in) to put these helpless schlemiels back together again.

If this continues, they might reconsider Mario Mendoza for the baseball Hall of Fame (the American one, he is already in Mexico’s Baseball Hall of Fame believe it or not). Mario’s baseball immortality stems from the fact that he carved out an eight-year baseball career while hitting a less-than-stout .215. From his uncanny ability to do what was necessary to avoid getting on base, the expression “Mendoza Line” found its way into baseball vernacular. So anytime a batter has an average of less than .200 (or less than George W. Bush’s approval rating), he is said to be hitting below the Mendoza Line. Well if old is the new new and 50 is the new 40, then why can’t hitting .200 be the new .300?

[Read more...]