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Thursday, December 18, 2014

Derrick Rose Steroids Problem Comment Results in Difficult-to-Believe P.R. Spin

Derrick Rose has backtracked on comments he made in the May 16th edition of ESPN the Magazine regarding the prevalence of performance-enhancing drugs in basketball. Rose was asked by a reporter “If 1 equals ‘What are PEDs (Performance Enhancing Drugs)’? and 10 equals ‘Everybody’s Juicing’ … How big of an issue is illegal enhancing in your sport?”

In response, Rose said, “Seven. It’s huge, and I think we need a level playing field, where nobody has that advantage over the next person.”

Though the comment was published in the Magazine over a week ago, it did not become an issue until Sunday when IamaGM.com wrote about it, according to Ken Berger. In response, Rose denied the comment.

“Regarding the quote attributed to me in ESPN The Magazine, I do not recall making the statement nor do I recall the question being asked,” Rose said. “If that was my response to any question, I clearly misunderstood what was asked of me. But, let me be clear, I do not believe there is a performance enhancing drug problem in the NBA.”

What on earth could Rose think he was being asked then to give the answer the magazine had? According to the Chicago Tribune, one person close to Rose said the question was posed to him as “How big of a problem would it be if steroid use were rampant in the NBA?”

If you believe that, then you’re an even bigger fool than the person for suggesting it. Who would respond to that question by answering “seven, it’s huge”? It makes no sense, and it really insults our collective intelligence for them to think we’d buy that answer. And if Rose really did misinterpret the question and give that answer, then there really is no doubt about this.

Recent violators of the NBA’s drug policy have been Rashard Lewis and O.J. Mayo, both of whom blamed their positive tests on tainted supplements. If their positive tests were indeed triggered by tainted supplements, then it would appear that PEDs are not an issue in the NBA. Either that, or the athletes have learned how to beat the tests.



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