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Tim Tebow Had Much More Success Than John Elway in First 10 Starts

John Elway is one of the best quarterbacks of all time. He’s a Hall of Famer who won two Super Bowls and an MVP. Tim Tebow is a second-year quarterback who hasn’t even played 16 games. His throwing motion is shaky, and he runs the ball a good amount of the time. The funny thing is his numbers blow away Elway’s through their first 10 respective starts.

There really isn’t a whole lot to deduce here, and this isn’t an argument that Tebow is better than Elway. There are so many things you could say that affect the conversation.

Elway’s first 10 starts came in his rookie year; most of Tebow’s first 10 starts have come in his second year. It’s also widely recognized that Elway played his best football later in his career. Still, it’s just funny how ugly Tebow’s style is perceived to be, yet how nice his stats are (overall). If he can continue to improve as a passer, and that’s a big if, he should continue to have success.

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  • http://www.sportsreviews.com/blog Brandon Williams

    It’s a pretty big if.

    We’ll also see when teams start to figure out the offense they have got going for Tebow. It may fade out as the Wildcat did.

  • Anonymous

    He won in High School, College & now Pros’. Why all the critics?? The game is about “WINNING”- not looking pretty or meeting expectations of “sport “EXPERTS” OR retired players now analists. (SPELLED the correct way for their abilities.)

  • Anonymous

    Tebow stats for his six games as a starter are BETTER than Elways’ first 6!!!!

  • Anonymous

    Interesting stats – but the game – and the rules – were different when Elway played. The game is “rigged” now towards passing. That said, Tebow had a great day last Sunday passing and Denver’s offense only started clicking when they went to a conventional running attack in the second half. Tebow only ran the ball three times.

    There is good progress being made; it would be unwise to go too far out on the record one way or another on Tebow just yet.

  • Anonymous

    Most critics had said he COULD NOT PASS the ball…Sunday commentator said he “could not hit the side of a bus”. He had a good day passing & only 3 runs-Now the game is “rigged” towards passing? I am not a big Tebow fan, JUST CONFUSED about what is expected of a 2nd year quarterback.

  • Anonymous

    Not meaning to offend you but once ANY specific offense OR defense is figured out- the teams using it must modify & adapt. Johnny U.- Joe Namath etc. had offenses tailored to them. The wishbone, triple option,  etc. were successful until figured out how to defend. They must be modified or abandoned.

  • Anonymous

    1. I’m not “most critics”

    2. I’m not Sunday’s commentator – although I watched the game as well and certainly didn’t hear anyone say Tim Tebow couldn’t hit the side of a bus – if anything Billick was effusive with praise for both young quarterbacks and said, “I’m in” when discussing Tebow. I wonder if the commentator didn’t preface the comment with something along the lines of, “you’ve heard the criticism that Tebow cannot hit the side of a bus”

    3. That the game is rigged for passing is not news – perhaps I didn’t make myself clear though. I wasn’t talking of the Broncos v Vikings game in the singular, I was talking about the NFL game in general over the last 5 – 7 years with the changes to what a defender can do to a receiver (or more to the point, what they can no longer do) and the rules that protect quarterbacks.

    What I expect from a 2nd year quarterback? Steady improvement. Which is what we have seen so far. That said, I’d like to see more; as a Bronco fan (and not a Bronco fan because I was a UF fan), it’s important to me that before we sink a ton of money into a QB, we know that he can make all the throws in all situations. Lots of QB’s have a good half season – I need to see more before I’m convinced. That goes for any QB.

    I will say this – again, as a Bronco fan – why we don’t go for two after every score is a mystery to me. From what I’ve seen, with Tebow on the field in that situation, we will score 2 points more than 50% of the time. Dude is nails at the goal line.

    Quick question: why are Tebow supporters so intent on getting butt-hurt on any comment that isn’t a glowing endorsement of all things Tebow? Is it possible they are doing the same nit-picking over-reacting that they accuse Tebow’s critics of?

  • Anonymous

    WOW ! sounds like I found that chip on your shoulder! I’m no expert- just a lifelong fan… Maybe in 50 more years I will grasp the game as you have… maybe you should play at that level.. I only reached the college level so I am no where as near qualified as some. If you did not hear what the commentator said= why would you assume that he prefaced it with a comment ? NOBODY said YOU were included in “most critics”. Lighten up to a good sports discussion & don’t take everything personal towards you.

  • Anonymous

    You were setting up a strawman argument by taking what commentators said and taking what I said and acting like someone was moving the target. (Figuratively, not literally). I called you on it. I have no chip on my shoulder. As far as lightening up, I’m perfectly fine. I’m not the one typing in all caps and taking exception to what someone else posted. I will, however, point out what I know to be true, and I notice you didn’t address the sports content of what I said which is: the passing game in the NFL is different now than it was when Elway played. As far as I can tell, you haven’t even begun having a “sports” discussion yet.

    I’d love a link to a commentator in the game on Sunday saying, “Tebow can’t hit the side of a bus.” Please provide it, thanks!

  • Anonymous

    New Yorker Oct. 24, 2011- Sport Sec.- quoted  “It’s gonna be hard to win if you can’t hit the side of a bus. “, comment by former reciever Keyshawn Johnson now commentator ESPN
    and repeated by same in pregame. If you want the video= look it up yourself. .Provided as requested.   You are welcome.

  • Anonymous

    You should notice in my earlier reply the phrase,” not meaning to offend you”. On this one- take it any way you like. DONE- OVER & OUT !

  • Anonymous

    Do you disagree with the statement? Do you think you can win a lot of NFL games with a QB that can’t hit the side of a bus?

  • Anonymous

    :) I’ve looked and looked for that phrase, but I don’t see it. Sorry you’re not up for discussing the content of what I originally posted which was that the passing game in the NFL has changed drastically since Elway posted those stats.

  • Anonymous

    The point about the Wildcat was the best.  A comment said any offense gets picked apart and analyzed and is then less effective.  This is true and you see it all the time where once a offense gets “on film” their success is limited.  It is more difficult to adapt to this particular offense because it is not what teams are used to and so this run may be longer then you would normally expect just on scheme.   The question is when they take one part of his game away will he be able to counter with another.  I am a Vikings fan and happened to be at the game yesterday.  The Broncos and Tebow were able to pass against this defense.  Maybe it is because Tim can do it or maybe its because they do not have the personnel to defend against the pass.  This was a weak secondary at the the beginning of the year and they now have four out of five d-backs out of service.  They are not good.  Just like teams were able to scheme against AD when he was the only option, the same may be true with Tebow., if they have the personnel to do so. 

  • Anonymous

    Interesting & informative opinion. I also agree that even teams with established offensive schemes need to constantly update as defenses learn to counter. This is what football is all about. It is & always has been a game of change and of course you can not compare a player of one era to one of another… this goes without being said  either by commentators, experts or fans. Teams & coaches that introduce new schemes are called innovative & in great demand ; even though now days most “new” ones are variations of something earlier with a few twists or changes. 

  • Anonymous

    I suspect as others do that the opposing teams will figure out new ways to defense him in subsequent years.   The option can be very sneaky and many teams have yet to defense it properly.

  • Anonymous

    “It is & always has been a game of change and of course you can not
    compare a player of one era to one of another… this goes without being
    said  either by commentators, experts or fans.”

    Glad to see you agree with the content of my original post. Not sure why it should go without saying, though.

  • Anonymous

    To quote a Clint Eastwood line = ” You Sir, are beginning to bore the hell out of me.” !

  • Anonymous

    I’m sure. That’s why you keep replying. Lol

    Let’s talk about one of the several football topics on this thread…

    Is Denver’s offense analogous to the Wildcat? Last week, they came out in the second half and ran a conventional running attack. Even when running the read-option, you don’t know that’s what is going to happen until the ball is snapped – unlike the Wildcat. So, while the read-option is fairly unusual in the NFL, aren’t teams making their defensive adjustments by changing their personnel (ala the Jets) or their scheme (Chargers)? And if that is true, doesn’t that make their defense vulnerable to other offensive schemes? What I’m getting at is this: I don’t think the read-option is the entire offense, just a part and I don’t think the plan is to use it exclusively – But if it’s working against a particular team ( and it is) why not have it in your arsenal?

    Also – why not go for two after every touchdown? Surely the Broncos will be successful at least 50% of the time…I’d wager they would be successful 70% of the time.