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Monday, June 24, 2019

Articles tagged: Jeremy Lin

Jeremy Lin defends JJ Redick over perceived racial slur

Jeremy Lin

JJ Redick insists that he did not intentionally use a racial slur toward Chinese people when he took part in a recent video celebrating the Chinese New Year, and the first American-born Chinese player to ever play in the NBA believes him.

Shortly after Redick issued an apology on Sunday, Jeremy Lin defended the 76ers guard on Twitter.

The video in question featured several NBA players wishing Chinese fans a Happy New Year. A YouTube user called attention to the fact that it sounded like Redick used a racial slur during his portion of the video.

Redick said at first that he was “tongue tied,” and he elaborated further in a lengthy Twitter post on Sunday evening. In it, Redick explained exactly what he was trying to say and why it came out the way that it did.

Mere common sense would tell you Redick is telling the truth. There’s virtually no chance he would ever use a word like that in a video that is designed to celebrate a certain group of fans. The slip of the tongue was certainly unfortunate, but there’s no reason to think Redick is lying about it. Kudos to Lin for using his influence as a Chinese-American player to help clear up the confusion.

Jeremy Lin plans to play ‘safer’ following knee injury

Jeremy Lin

Many players say they won’t change who they are or how they play after they suffer a serious injury, but Jeremy Lin does think he will make some adjustments.

Lin spoke with the media for the first time since rupturing his patella tendon in the Brooklyn Nets’ first game of the season. He says his rehab is going well and that he expects to be ready for training camp in the fall.

And though he plans to maintain his same playing style, Lin says he wants to make some “safer” changes to his game.

“I am not going to change the bread and butter of who I am, which is downhill, attacking, dynamic playmaking. I will always be that player,” Lin said, via ESPN’s Ohm Youngmisuk. “Maybe the type of risks … I don’t know, I never really saw them as risks, but what we will see is probably a similar style but in a safer way. I will still be in the paint heavy, but I won’t be landing on my legs the same way, getting off-balanced unless obviously I am forced to, but the landing, taking contact, being able to engage certain muscles before contact, before I take off, all those things are really, really important … A lot of other muscles will be absorbing impact that maybe joints shouldn’t be.”

Saying what he intends to do and being able to stick it while playing in fast-paced, high-tempo games are two different things. Hopefully he’ll be able to come back at full strength and stay healthy for the Nets. In his two years with the team, he’s only been able to play in 37 games due to a hamstring injury last year and the knee injury this season.

Jeremy Lin to have knee injury evaluated amid ‘tremendous concern’

Jeremy Lin

Jeremy Lin is set to have his knee evaluated on Thursday after injuring it in his season debut for the Brooklyn Nets on Wednesday night.

Lin was driving to the basket and went up for a layup in the fourth quarter against the Indiana Pacers when he landed on his right leg. He went down immediately and was in pain. He even appeared to cry and say “I’m done.”

ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski says there is tremendous concern surrounding the injury.

Lin had 18 points in 25 minutes in the season opener.

This is an awful way to start the season for Lin, who was limited to just 36 games last season because of injuries.

Kenyon Martin attempts to clarify his Jeremy Lin comments

Kenyon Martin look

Kenyon Martin is doing his best to set the record straight about his “feud” with Brooklyn Nets guard Jeremy Lin.

Speaking to Rohan Nadkarni of Sports Illustrated on Friday, the ex-All-Star attempted to clarify his recent remarks bashing Lin for wearing dreadlocks.

“This was never meant to be racial,” said Martin. “It was thought of as what would’ve been done in our locker room. It would’ve been jokes. We would’ve been making jokes. It’s far from racist. I guess saying “Wanting to be black” made it racial. But I despise people that look down because of race.

“It was meant to be a ‘Ha Ha Ha’ moment,” the retired big man continued. “If you watch, I was laughing in the statements. It got taken too far. I wanted to clear the air. I don’t know Jeremy. He’s had a few crazy hairstyles before and I had the same thought process: ‘WTF.’ But I wasn’t trying to be racist.”

Earlier this week, Martin commented on “that bullsh*t on [Lin’s] head” and pointed to the supposed irony of having dreadlocks with an Asian last name. Though Lin himself posted a classy response on Instagram, the public reaction to Martin’s remarks was overwhelmingly negative and even resulted in him receiving a hex from a rap deity. Best to just take the L and move on, K-Mart.

Jeremy Lin has classy response to Kenyon Martin’s critical comments about his hair

Jeremy Lin is taking the high road in response to former NBA big man Kenyon Martin’s negative comments about his new hairstyle.

In case you missed it, Lin is now sporting dreadlocks and recently wrote a piece for The Player’s Tribune discussing it. In the piece, the Brooklyn Nets guard touches on themes such as self-expression and cultural appropriation.

Nevertheless, Lin’s new look did not go over well with Martin, who is a former Net. Here’s what Martin said, per Anthony Puccio of SB Nation:

Soon afterwards, Lin posted a classy response to Martin on Instagram:

Puccio also notes that the claim about Martin having Chinese tattoos is true:

Lin is obviously highly attuned to issues of race and culture, so credit to him for turning something as seemingly trivial as a hairdo into an opportunity for a constructive sociocultural dialogue.

Jeremy Lin declares Nets will make playoffs in 2017-18

The Brooklyn Nets were by far the worst team in the NBA last season, but that doesn’t phase guard Jeremy Lin at all.

In an Instagram Live video over the weekend, Lin responded to a question about how well he thinks the Nets will do next season by declaring, “We’re making the playoffs. I don’t care what anybody else says.”

It should be quite the uphill climb to say the least after the Nets finished a league-worst 20-62 in 2016-17. They only improved their roster marginally if anything this offseason by acquiring D’Angelo Russell from the Los Angeles Lakers but giving up leading scorer Brook Lopez to do so. They also landed the likes of Timofey Mozgov and DeMarre Carroll, but both fit the mold of salary dump fodder better than that of active contributor to winning basketball.

Then again, somewhere in the 35-win range might be enough to make the playoffs in the rancid Eastern Conference, and Lin, who often looked like the best player on the team when he was on the court last season, missed over half the year with injury. The Nets also have an underrated head coach in Kenny Atkinson, so if a few things break their way in 2017-18, the prediction of Lin, who has always been all-in on the team, might not be all that outlandish.

Video via SLAM Online

Jeremy Lin: Racist remarks from fans, opponents were worse in college

Jeremy Lin

Jeremy Lin is one of the most prominent Asian American athletes in the country, but it’s probably no surprise to hear that he has dealt with racist insults from fans and opponents alike.

However, the Brooklyn Nets guard said that the worst of it came in college, not in the NBA.

“The worst was at Cornell when I was being called a c—k,” Lin said on the “Outside Shot with Randy Foye” podcast, via Ohm Youngmisuk of ESPN. “That’s when it happened. I don’t know … that game, I ended up playing terrible and getting a couple of charges and doing real out of character stuff. My teammate told my coaches [that] they were calling Jeremy a c—k the whole first half. I didn’t say anything because when that stuff happens, I kind of just, I go and bottle up where I go into turtle mode and don’t say anything and just internalize everything.”

Lin detailed other stories, such as when a Georgetown fan shouted Asian American stereotypes at him, and when he was heckled during a game at Yale over his eyes. He also relayed a story in which an unnamed Vermont coach used a derogatory term that the referees blatantly ignored.

“In Vermont, I remember because I had my hands up while the Vermont player was shooting free throws [that] their coach was like, ‘Hey ref! You can’t let that Oriental do that!'” Lin recalled. “I was like, what is going on here? I have been called a c—k by players in front of the refs, the refs heard it because they were yelling it [like,] ‘Yeah, get that out, c—k!’ And the ref heard it, looked at both of us and didn’t do anything.

“It’s crazy. My teammate started yelling at the ref, you just heard it, it was impossible for you not to hear that. How could you not do something? And the ref just pretended like nothing happened. That was when I was like, yo, this [kind of racism and prejudice] is a beast. So when I got to the NBA, I thought, this is going to be way worse. But it is way better. Everybody is way more under control.”

Lin said that he still hears occasional remarks in the NBA, but uses them as a motivator.

“To this day in the NBA, there are still some times where there are still some fans that will say smaller stuff and that is not a big deal,” Lin said. “But that motivates me in a different way.”

Lin’s remarks come at a time when discussion of racist abuse is at the forefront due to Adam Jones’s experience in Boston. It happens more than many of us would care to admit.