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Floyd Mayweather Thrown Out of the Ring by Big Show

I told you recently about Floyd Mayweather Jr. agreeing to wrestle the gargantuan Big Show for $20 million. As a boxing fan, I conceded that Mayweather can do whatever he wants because he’s earned it by beating his competition (with the exception of Cotto). Now I’m actually starting to get worried for the guy. Perhaps his safety can be jeopardized by the fight. First it was Floyd and Big Show getting into it a few weeks ago with Mayweather even landing a clean shot on Big Show. Then on Monday night in Milwaukee, this happened:

If the WWE signed Pretty Boy up in order to get mainstream media coverage, it’s worked. Those geniuses. They have me hooked on Floyd, even if I won’t be watching the match. I think it’s just Pretty Boy’s personality — you know, the fact that he enjoys counting out $1 million in cash on camera! Check out the video in case you’ve never seen a million dollars in cash before …

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Judges Used Open Scoring for Peter vs. Maskaev Fight

Heavyweights Samuel Peter and Oleg Maskaev fought Saturday night in Cancun, for all those who missed it. The fight wasn’t as much exciting as it was progressive in procedure. Michael David Smith points out at FanHouse that the judges used open scoring, meaning their scores were announced after each round. If you recall, I had an interview with renowned boxing judge, Chuck Giampa, and I asked him that very question. Giampa was against the practice, as were Jim Lampley and Max Kellerman (both were commentating for the fight). MDS points out that the fight went just fine with the procedure, and that the fighters paused to hear the score before each round. He says Peter was even the aggressor after knowing he was already winning.

Though Lampley and Kellerman didn’t give reasons why they were against the open scoring system according to MDS, I can come up with a few. For one thing, though it might not have in this case, a fighter can purposely avoid contact if he knows he’s already winning. Secondly, maybe the judges could be influenced by the scores of the other judges, perhaps beginning to second guess themselves. Remember, judges see the fights from different angles, logically resulting in varying scores. Still, I believe the open scoring would help to keep the judges in check, and it would allow a fighter the conscious opportunity to win a fight he’s losing on the cards. Say the fighter knows he’s losing on the cards though he believes he’s winning, he then can resort to head-hunting for a K.O. I really think the benefits of this system would outweigh the negatives.

Mike Tyson and Evander Holyfield to Fight for a Third Time?

Evander Holyfield recently revealed that Mike Tyson’s people have approached him about fighting Iron Mike once again. Call me crazy, call me strange, call me in a Mike Tyson frame of mind, but my ears perk up to the news that Mike Tyson and Evander Holyfield are considering a third fight. The details as told by Holyfield:

“Mike had Jeff Fenech, who’s been training him, call me a few months ago. Jeff says Mike wants to fight me again – but he needs to know if I would agree to it. I said, ‘It all depends on what they gonna give us – because I’m gonna catch a lot of flak if I say I’m fighting Mike Tyson again. I’ve already said I don’t want to fight Mike no more’. Jeff says, ‘What if Mike gets in proper shape?’ I told him that’s OK but I can’t be part of it if Mike’s going to pull out. Jeff said, ‘The main thing Mike wants to know is if you would be willing to fight him again?’ I said, ‘Yeah, if the price is right, I probably would’.”

That’s all I need to hear — if the price is right, Oldfield would do it. There’s a shock. A dude who returns to the ring multiple times to fight nobodies when he’s over the hill telling us he’d fight for money. Mike Tyson is a trainwreck in our society whose erratic behavior is nearly unparalleled. Who wouldn’t want to watch the dude climb back in the ring again against The Real Deal. I’m totally down. Besides, not like Oldfield doesn’t have a second ear, right?

Floyd Mayweather Jr. Getting $20 Million to Make Wrestling Debut

There were rumors that Pretty Boy was contemplating a future in MMA. That’s no surprise considering the relationship he struck up with Mark Cuban who owns HDNet (and a little something called the Dallas Mavericks). Anyway, the offers from MMA must not have been enticing enough for PBF who’s looking to score another big payday after raking in the dough from his fight with Oscar De La Hoya. And apparently Pretty Boy has spun the wheel of fortune and landed on wrestling.

Floyd is making his wrestling debut and will be paid $20 million for his fight against some dude named Big Show. Since I’ve never seen WWE, I had no idea who Show was. Now I understand the nickname — he’s 7′ tall and weighs 430 lbs. That’s a lotta man. While Pretty Boy is making his name as a shrewd businessman, this can’t please boxing fans. Unfortunately when promising challengers like Paul Williams lose fights in Temecula, it doesn’t really help the cause. About the only other claim boxing purists can make is that Mayweather should fight Miguel Cotto. Aside from that, there’s really no gripe boxing fans can make. Pretty Boy can pretty much do anything he wants and we can’t say anything about it. Though I do have to say, I’d much rather see the man in the boxing ring. He just doesn’t have a whole lot to gain from it.

Do We Really Need a Mayweather vs. De La Hoya Rematch?

Back when these two met up in May, I analyzed the bout so well pre-fight that I nailed the outcome. Why is that? Because a matchup between Oscar De La Hoya and Floyd Mayweather Jr. is quite predictable; Oscar is bigger and stronger while Floyd is younger and more skilled. Therefore, Mayweather will outpoint De La Hoya, though he won’t score a KO, nor be knocked out himself. Now that we know what will happen in the second fight between the two, why do we need to see this transpire on the canvas once again?

It’s being said that Mayweather and De La Hoya will fight some time in September, though the venue and exact date are not certain. It’s pretty clear to me exactly what is going on. These are two smart business men who are excellent at marketing themselves and their bouts. They plan to get around $25 million per man by fighting, so why not make it happen again? I know it’s a good payday, but come on guys, you really expect us to get all excited again to see the same thing? This is not what the boxing community wants from you, Floyd. This is just as bad of a money grab as what these two clowns are doing. Why not get with it and sign on to fight Miguel Cotto or Paul Williams? That might not get you the same type of green, but it will give you a place in the conversation as the best pound-for-pound fighter in history. So tell me, what’s the real goal at hand?

Mark Cuban Was in Floyd Mayweather Jr.’s Ring Entourage

You’ve already seen my break down of the actual fight, but I just couldn’t resist that screen grab of Wayne Newton. Unbeknownst to me, Mark Cuban, Helio Castroneves, and Wayne Newton, were all in attendance Saturday night to support their Dancing With Stars buddy, Floyd Mayweather Jr. Not only were they there to cheer the man on, but they also formed part of Mayweather’s entourage as he entered the ring. Can you picture a more excited man than the delighted Mark Cuban, who entered bearing a few of Floyd’s championship belts?

To think, Cubes actually abandoned his Mavs for a night to be at this fight. Judging by the smug look on his face, he couldn’t have been more proud. I do have to say, Josh Howard would not be pleased.

Mayweather vs. Hatton: A Clash Along Racial Lines?

The thought hadn’t even entered my mind until late Saturday evening, after Mayweather had already dominated Hatton. I was going for Hatton because I had picked him to win, figuring his combination of power, brawn, and desire would catch an unprepared Mayweather by surprise. I was wrong, but not disappointed. To be upset over an American beating a foreigner in international competition would be unpatriotic, would it not? Well, it was suggested to me Saturday night that support for each fighter was divided upon racial lines — all white guys rooted for Hatton, and all black guys wanted Mayweather. Hispanic fans I guess chose one side or the other, just waiting for Miguel Cotto to get his shot.

As I said, I wanted Hatton to win so as to vindicate my pre-fight analysis. The reason I lost confidence in Floyd, a man whom I’ve backed since his up-and-coming days as a 130 pound featherweight nearly 10 years ago, is because of the way I had been burned before; Mayweather was dominating opponents the way Roy Jones Jr. once had in his weight class, developing a reputation as the best pound-for-pound fighter in the world. Roy quickly became bored with his competition and pursued other interests including professional basketball and music, and wound up getting exposed by Antonio Tarver. Just a few months ago, I saw the same thing in the works with Floyd who was more focused on preparing for Dancing With the Stars than boxing. So was race a dividing factor in this fight? For some, perhaps. For others, myself included, I think it’s Floyd’s pretentious personality that’s a turnoff.

No doubt though, Floyd showed his masterful skill in the ring, living up to his nickname by finished the fight looking pretty. Hatton hardly landed any big shots on Floyd, who maneuvered his way out of the corner of the ring to dance around in the center and utterly dominate the fight. Floyd’s speed caught Hatton off-guard on several occasions, making it seem like Ricky walked into punches. Floyd is the best fighter in the world right now, but he still has a few more fights to take before his legacy is cemented. Next up should be Miguel Cotto, followed by the new Sweet Pea, Paul Williams. Though Mayweather has quickly amassed a fortune of earnings in the sport (back-to-back $25 million fights tells you the sweet science is alive and well), his place in the history books remains in question. I’m guessing it’s only a matter of time before Floyd loses focus and falls unexpectedly to an opponent. After all, it’s happened so many times before, hasn’t it?

(incredible photo courtesy Al Bello/Getty Images)