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Roger Federer has to take down kids playhouse because it obstructs neighbors’ view

Roger Federer twin daughters

If we had a “Rich People Problems” category here at LBS, a recent story about Roger Federer’s home in Switzerland would be perfect for it. According to Swiss news outlet The Local, Federer’s children may lose their playhouse because it is too large and is drawing complaints from the neighbors.

Local residents in Lenzerheide-Valbella have reportedly complained that the playhouse has “impaired their view of the mountains” and is a breech of planning permission rules. Authorities have upheld the complaint, ruling that the construction was done in an unauthorized area.

Federer, who has two sets of twins with his wife Mirka, is trying to work out an amicable solution with his neighbors.

And that, my friends, is how the other half lives.

H/T For the Win

Roger Federer’s twin daughters wore matching dresses at Wimbledon and looked adorable

Roger Federer twin daughters Wimbledon

Roger Federer may not have won Wimbledon this year as he hoped, but he still gets to go home a winner.

The 32-year-old had his family in London watching him in the finals as he fell to Novak Djokovic in five exciting sets on Sunday, and you know he appreciated the support. What was cool was seeing his identical twin daughters — Myla Rose and Charlene Riva — in the stands with his wife, Mirka. The twins, who turn five on July 23, were wearing matching dresses and just looked adorable.

“It’s even more memorable when I see my kids there with my wife and everything. That’s what touched me the most. Disappoint of the match itself went pretty quickly … so happy to see family and nice ovations from the crowd lifted me up and made me feel better,” said Federer at the match.

Roger Federer twin daughters

In addition to his twin girls, Roger and Mirka also have twin boys, who were born on May 6. Roger always was a doubles specialist.

Roger Federer not a fan of Wimbledon dress code

Roger FedererRoger Federer has won seven Wimbledons and practically owns the tournament. He is also very respectful and compliant with the tournament’s traditions. But that doesn’t mean he’s a fan of all their regulations.

Federer, who reached his 9th Wimbledon final, has been wearing more flamboyant outfits at his majors lately. He showcased some pink shoes at the US Open last year, and he wore white shoes with orange soles at Wimbledon in 2013. The orange soles were problematic for the All England Club, and he was told to change them.

Federer believes Wimbledon has become stricter over time and hopes that mentality will be eased.

“My personal opinion, I think it’s too strict,” Federer said of the dress code this week. “But I respect. I understand. Maybe one day they’ll loosen up the grip again a bit, but that’s the time we go through right now.”

Wimbledon officials have cracked down on undergarments, headbands and wrist bands, applying the all-white policy equally to all clothing. That’s what led Federer to make his comments.

Is Wimbledon’s policy kind of lame or outdated? Probably. And you know apparel companies like Nike can’t stand it, because it prevents them from showcasing their top merchandise on a big stage. But you know what? I actually like their dress code. Sure, they get a little ridiculous at times, but this is part of what separates the tournament from everything else. The traditions and regalness make Wimbledon special. If they change their policies, they’ll be a tournament and major like all the others. Who wants that to happen?

Novak Djokovic vs. Roger Federer rivalry head-to-head match history

Roger Federer Novak DjokovicNovak Djokovic and Roger Federer have both reached the finals at Wimbledon and will be facing each other Sunday to mark their 35th time playing against each other.

Djokovic is the top seed and was a favorite to win the entire tournament, so reaching the finals is no surprise. Federer, who turns 33 next month, was seeded fourth and lost in the fourth round of two of the last three majors. Making the finals is pretty impressive. The last time he reached a major final was two years ago at Wimbledon.

Based on his history against Nole and at Wimbledon, you have to give Federer a shot at winning. Roger has won more titles at Wimbledon than anywhere else and has gone 7-for-8 in the finals at the All England Club.

Let’s take a look at the head-to-head match history in this rivalry between the players.

Federer leads the series 18-16 in their 34 meetings. He has gone 6-5 against Djokovic in majors.

The last time they met was in the semifinals at Monte Carlo this year. Federer won that match 7-5, 6-2, though Djokovic had his wrist heavily taped and was playing through an injury. That was nearly three months ago, and Djokovic’s wrist seems to be fine since then.

Though they have played 34 times, the only occasion they met on grass courts came two years ago at Wimbledon when Roger won the tournament. Federer won their semifinals match in four sets pretty easily, 6-3, 3-6, 6-0, 6-3.

One aspect of each players’ game that has been pretty notable at Wimbledon is how much they’re coming into the net. Roger isn’t a straight serve-and-volley guy, but he tends to follow that style at Wimbledon pretty often. He came into the net 32 times in his semifinal win over Milos Raonic and won a devastating 75 percent of those points. He also played mistake-free tennis and only committed 11 unforced errors. Though Roger liked coming into the net at Wimbledon anyways, you have to figure the influence of new coach Stefan Edberg, a former serve-and-volleyer, has played a role in that.

The same can be said for Djokovic, who typically plays from the baseline. Nole came into the net an absurd 47 times in his four-set win over Grigor Dimitrov in the semifinals. He won 57 percent of those points, which isn’t nearly as high as Federer’s success rate at the net. His determination to come into the net in an attempt to end points early is likely due to the influence of his new coach, Boris Becker. Like Edberg, Becker came from a similar era and dominated Wimbledon with his game at the net. His influence has definitely been seen throughout the tournament.

There is a ton at stake for both players.

Federer is looking for his 18 career grand slam singles title. He’s looking for his eighth Wimbledon title, which would snap a tie with Pete Sampras and give him the sole record.

Djokovic is hoping to win his seventh grand slam singles title and second Wimbledon. He also wants to turn around his fate in the finals of grand slams; he’s lost his last three grand slam finals — two to Rafael Nadal, and one to Andy Murray.

Though Wimbledon is Federer’s tournament and he has been playing well, we’re giving Nole the edge.

Roger Federer wants Rafael Nadal called for time violations

Roger Federer racketRoger Federer believes the rules should be applied equally to all players when it comes to time violations, and that includes Rafael Nadal.

Federer talked last week about the time rules at Wimbledon and had a response when informed that Nadal was averaging 25 seconds in between points during a match Thursday against Lukas Rosol. At grand slam events, only 20 seconds are allowed.

“You cannot take 25 seconds. I mean, I know you need to focus. That you can do in 10 seconds,” said Federer, who has had an issue for years with Nadal taking so long between points. “It just can’t be that we only see two points per minute. Of course you need to give leeway [after] tough rallies and to somebody who needs a bit more time. I’m fine with that. I watched some matches, I don’t remember who it was, but they were playing so slow I was like, OK, I really can’t watch it. It’s going too slow for me.”

Nadal responded to Federer’s comments.

“It comes a time when this little song gets everyone tired. There is an umpire, let’s let him take those decisions, that’s what he is there for. People should stop coming to press conferences always repeating the same things.”

He then turned the tables onto Novak Djokovic.

“Also, I don’t think I am the only one violating the rule,” continued Nadal via Tennis World. “Novak Djokovic too has been warned many times. Actually I think he has been told off many more times than I did.”

Nothing like deflecting the attention from yourself by redirecting it to someone else.

Though rules are rules, I feel like this is something minor, especially if a player is only doing it once in a while. But if they’re consistently violating it and taking excessive amounts of time, then it’s a problem. Keep in mind that for other events, the time limit is 25, so that’s what these players are used to. I think it’s tough to expect them to break their habits just for grand slams.

Roger Federer and wife reportedly expecting second set of twins

Roger-Federer-wife-MirkaYou know how we know Roger Federer is one of the greatest athletes of all time? He only creates children two at a time.

According to the NY Daily News, Federer and his wife Mirka are expecting twins in July. The couple already has two children, identical twin daughters Myla and Charlene, who were born in 2009. This will be the second set of twins for Roger and Mirka.

Federer announced that his wife was pregnant on Christmas Eve. His older sister Diana also has twins, so they must run in the family. You know who else recently gave birth to twin daughters? Michael Jordan’s wife Yvette Prieto. Coincidence? I think not. Legends do it big.

Roger Federer hits crazy overhead winner with wicked spin (Video)

Roger Federer grinRoger Federer is so good that even when he mishits a ball, it still goes in for a winner.

Fed is playing doubles at the Brisbane International with Nicolas Mahut (you know him from his marathon match with John Isner) and the two beat Jeremy Chardy and Grigor Dimitrov (Maria Sharapova’s boyfriend) in three sets. At one point, Federer retreated to return a lob and hit an overhead for a winner. But the winner was unconventional; he hit the ball off the frame of his racket with so much backspin that the ball barely cleared the net and then bounced back over to Federer’s side.

All Federer could do was give an embarrassed grin.

H/T Bryan A. Graham