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Ryan Day shares how much NIL money he thinks Ohio State football needs

Ryan Day coaching

Nov 30, 2019; Ann Arbor, MI, USA; Ohio State Buckeyes head coach Ryan Day before the game against the Michigan Wolverines at Michigan Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Tim Fuller-USA TODAY Sports

Name, image and likeness (NIL) deals have changed the recruiting and transfer process in college football. Players can now choose to go to a school where they feel they can make the most money through NIL deals. Ohio State football head coach Ryan Day has a price in mind to make sure his players don’t leave for other schools over NIL deals.

On Thursday, Day addressed members of the Columbus business community at a campus event to unveil an NIL Corporate Ambassador Program for the school. The program is intended to encourage businesses to hire Ohio State athletes as endorsers through the athletic department.

According to Cleveland.com, Day said the Buckeyes need around $13 million per season to avoid losing players to transfers.

“One phone call, and they’re out the door,” Day said. “We cannot let that happen at Ohio State. I’m not trying to sound the alarm, I’m just trying to be transparent about what we’re dealing with.”

Day isn’t the only prominent college football coach who has expressed concern over NIL deals.

The Buckeyes have long been able to attract the nation’s most talented recruits due to their status and winning tradition. But NIL deals have changed the playing field. Multiple Ohio State players could wind up entering the transfer portal after the season just to see what other deals are out there for them.

Ohio State would have to offer enough NIL deals to keep players. Day estimated that top quarterbacks will now require up to $2 million in NIL money. Major offensive tackles and pass rushers could be worth around half of that, he believes.

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