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The Seat Just Got Hotter for Charlie Weis, Cooler for Rich Rodriguez

Notre Dame Michigan FootballHard to believe after the way I ripped Rich Rodriguez that I had to root for him to win on Saturday, but that was the case. People are saying the game was an instant classic and it surely was a good one, but was it as good as the Bush Push game? Not quite that good. Anyway, Charlie Weis is taking a ton of heat for throwing two passes at the end of the game while the Irish were trying to nurse a 34-31 lead.

They had the ball 2nd and 9 at their 30 when they threw two straight incompletions taking just 20 seconds off the clock, leaving 2:19 for the Wolverines who got the ball at their 43. Weis said he was just trying to win the game, “They loaded up the box and made it clear that they weren’t going to let us do that, so we had to throw the ball. On third down, we could have run and made them use a timeout, but we were trying to win the game.”

Forcier said that saving the timeouts for their final drive was key and there’s no doubt it was. By making Michigan burn their timeouts, the Wolverines would have had a much tougher time moving the ball in the final drive and they might have had to settle for a field goal. You telling me Weis wouldn’t have taken his chances in overtime? No doubt that was a tactical error and it was extremely costly. The only question is whether or not this leads to a tailspin and a new head coach for Notre Dame. I guess it was just another lesson in Weis’ coaching internship.

Surprise! Rich Rodriguez Breaks NCAA Practice Rules at Michigan

Utah Michigan FootballWhat else can we add to the resume of Rich Rodriguez? Recruiting and playing badboys Pacman Jones and Chris Henry — check. Recruiting a known drug dealer to play quarterback — check. Breaking NCAA practice rules? Check.

Players on the 2008 and 2009 teams described training and practice sessions that far exceeded limits set by the NCAA, which governs college athletics.

The players say they routinely are required to work out or practice many more hours throughout the year than the NCAA allows. They also say members of Rodriguez’s staff have broken rules by monitoring off-season scrimmages.

Hmm, how was it that Rich Rodriguez had a leg up on the competition when he was at West Virginia? Pretty easy if you’re spending about two-three times the amount of time with the team than the NCAA allows, especially if most programs are coming closer to the limit (I’m guessing most push and surpass the limit, but not by this amount). Actually the veteran players say the team followed the rules under Lloyd Carr. Student-athlete my butt — Rich Rod’s there for one reason — to run the football team at professional standards. Michigan sold its soul to the Rod and now they’ll likely pay the punishment price.

Rich Rodriguez Claims Innocence in Recruiting Drug Dealer Justin Feagin

justin-feaginLook, I might not know the ins and outs of Michigan’s recruiting, but I do know one thing: Rich Rodriguez has a reputation for recruiting players of the most questionable character. At West Virginia, some of the NFL’s biggest delinquents played for him including Pacman Jones and Chris Henry. That’s why it wasn’t too surprising to hear that Michigan quarterback Justin Feagin was a drug dealer who was kicked off the Wolverines team when it was found out he was brokering a coke deal on campus. Rich Rod’s playing dumb, saying there were no negatives with Feagin until that point. I’m not buying it:

The fact is Rodriguez had been recruiting Justin Feagin for several months. He did not just discover him in late January 2008 and sign him in early February. Rodriguez and his quarterbacks coach, Rod Smith, originally wanted Feagin to join them at West Virginia.

[Feagin's] cohort in the coke deal, T.J. Burke, told police it was “common knowledge that Feagin sold marijuana.” And Feagin said he had been in a fight in Studio 4 in Ann Arbor and that police were called.

I’ve already made up my mind on this one, but as they say on Monday Night Football, you make the call. Hmm, a guy who recruited Pacman, Chris Henry, and a convicted armed robber to his West Virginia team knew exactly what he was getting into. Rodriguez will win at all costs and bring down the quality and reputation of the university in the process. Ohio State fans must be having a field day with this one.

Rich Rodriguez Might Be King of the College Football Scum

Back when Bobby Petrino left Atlanta for Arkansas, I pondered whether or not the meeting between Petrino’s Razorbacks and Nick Saban’s Crimson Tide would be the worst matchup ever. I may have to amend that post. If Arkansas and Michigan were to meet, I think that would be the worst game ever. As JS emailed in with the tip, West Virginia is suspicious of former coach, Rich Rodriguez, who may or may not have destroyed some old football documents. The files contained information — good or bad — on every single player in the West Virginia program. They reportedly disappeared between the time that Rodriguez resigned and the team returned from the Fiesta Bowl. Important documents? I wonder, where could they have gone?

And as far as my title and whatnot goes, even if Rodriguez is cleared of this issue, he’s still way up there on the scum list. Think about it; Rodriguez ran a program that boasted both Pacman Jones and Chris Henry as its star student athletes. Can you believe the two encountered this much trouble in the NFL but none in college at West Virginia under Rodriguez? Gimme a break. And what does it say about West Virginia for letting Rodriguez run the program with those cats only to leak this story to the press for sympathy as soon as he leaves? Don’t think I’m not seeing right through you enablers.

Ryan Mallett’s Transfer Indicates Upcoming Shift in Big Ten

We all know how coaching changes can effect the school the coach leaves behind. In Rich Rodriguez’s case, he was sued by his former employer. On top of that, the coach leaves behind several players he recruited, as well as an athletic department charged with the job of hiring a replacement. While that coach jumps to anticipated greener pastures, not much thought though is given to the people at the new school who might have trouble adjusting. One such player is Michigan QB Ryan Mallett, who’s transferring because he already knows he won’t fit in with Rich Rodriguez’s spread offense:

“I just felt forced out, not by any person, but by the system,” Mallett said late Wednesday night. “I just don’t think me and his system … it just doesn’t fit.”

Simply watching West Virginia play was enough to direct Mallett.

“Looking at their game film, you can see what they’re trying to do with (running quarterback) Pat White,” Mallett said. “I didn’t think I could do that the same way.”

It’s interesting that Mallett acted first, not even giving Rodriguez a chance. He already knows what many are soon to find out — Rich Rodriguez will open up the Big Ten to the spread (that Purdue has been running for quite some time), and introduce more speed to the conference. Mallett’s departure from Michigan serves to me as a milestone event saying that the landscape of the Big Ten is now about to change. Welcome to the 21st century boys.

(oh yeah, and Mallett’s supposedly talking to Neuheisel about transferring to UCLA, high five!)