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Friday, December 19, 2014

Tedy Bruschi: Arian Foster Tweeting Picture of MRI ‘Incredibly Stupid’

Arian Foster’s hamstring injury has taken on a life of its own for a variety of reasons. For one, he is the top overall pick in most fantasy drafts after his monstrous season last year. Also, Foster seems to enjoy talking about the injury more than the media does.  Earlier this week, Foster lambasted fans for only worrying about his injury because of their fantasy football teams.  On Wednesday, he tweeted a picture of his injured hamstring for the entire world to see.

Imagine what Bill Belichick would do to one of his players if they tweeted a picture of an MRI?  He probably wouldn’t say much, but that player would not be on the Patriots roster more than an hour after the tweet went out.  That is the Patriot way, and apparently the Patriot way is a concept Tedy Bruschi believes everyone should adhere to.

“This was just incredibly stupid, if you ask me,” Bruschi told Colin Cowherd on ESPN Radio Thursday morning. “I mean, you’re twittin’ [sic] MRI picture, X-rays, you’re giving other teams intimate knowledge of your playing ability. Incredibly dumb.

“You know what I’m going to like also, as a defensive player, if this is his hamstring? Noting that the sore spot, the white spot that he calls ‘anti-awesomeness’ right there, is in the middle of the hamstring. As I’m getting up off of a pile, maybe I push. Maybe that’s where I push to get up, because I know that’s exactly where it is, and I give it a little dig, I give it a little twist, and I get off of the pile. Maybe I do that.”

People will probably blast Bruschi for the comments and call him a dirty player, but he is being truthful about life in the NFL.  Players were going to target Foster’s fragile hamstring anyway, let alone Arian giving them a blueprint to follow.  Talking about an injury is not a brilliant idea to begin with.  Tweeting an MRI of one is completely unnecessary.

Helmet smack to Shutdown Corner for the story.



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