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Missouri State Hockey Unveils Pink Ice for Breast Cancer Awareness (Picture)

Unfortunately, there is a good chance we all know someone who has been affected by breast cancer in some way.  While I realize it is the least they can do, I really enjoy seeing NFL players and other athletes sport the pink wristbands, cleats, gloves, and other accessories to do their part in helping raise awareness about breast cancer.  It’s also nice to see athletic programs and athletes like these ones with their haircuts still finding new and creative ways to show their support for a good cause.  Check out this picture of the Missouri State hockey team’s pink ice, courtesy of Darren Rovell on Twitter:

It’s not the easiest on the eyes, but it is definitely a unique gesture that stands for something important.  Bravo to whoever came up with the idea and made it happen.


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  • Anonymous

    We do this every year, Steve. It’s actually very common. Green ice for St Patty’s day. Orange ice for Halloween, etc.

  • Anonymous

    Ah, good call Spin. Never seen it before. Very cool, though.

  • http://larrybrownsports.com Larry Brown

    Must take a lot of Pepto Bismol to fill up an entire rink, no?

  • Anonymous

    I don’t know if I’m talking or chewing gum but I sure look stupid.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8fWWsKaBSE4

  • http://larrybrownsports.com Larry Brown

    hahaha

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_JDQLPNFS6HOCOFBVIYUWP3SGEY Mr E

    If “we all know someone who has been effected by breast cancer” then why do we need to raise ‘awareness’ of it?
    Why just single out this one cancer? Why not pick one that effects everyone, not mostly women? If every sporting team did the same to support testicular cancer, would there be a women’s rights activist group picketing outside? Absolutely. So what gives THIS type of sickness prevelance? 

  • Anonymous

    When writing this post, somehow I knew one of our commenters would do their best to find the negative in it.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Theresa-NoWay/1546522811 Theresa NoWay

    Probably because, despite its prevalence, until the last decade where “we raised awareness,” diseases that affected women, or affected women differently than men, were largely ignored or had rather insignificant attention to the symptoms, causes, treatments, and cures as they related to women.  As an example, heart disease was researched and reported from a male-centric approach.  Despite being the Number One killer of women, all the symptoms and research on cause and prevention were done with male subjects.  Since awareness has been raised, we now know that heart disease has different effects and symptoms in women.  Awareness still needs to be raised because more has to be done since breast cancer affects a large portion of the female population and some of the male population, and as a result, somehow affects nearly everyone as pointed out that most people know someone who does, or had, breast cancer.
     
    (and if you’re going to quote someone, actually quote what they said (as he used the correct word- affect- and you used effect, which is incorrect)- “we all know someone who has been affected by breast cancer in some way.”)

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Theresa-NoWay/1546522811 Theresa NoWay

    Also, despite everyone knowing someone affected by breast cancer prior to the campaign to raise awareness, most people didn’t know how pervasive this disease was. “Raising awareness” of it is educating people as to how many suffer from it, how much work needs to still be done to combat it, and how it affects our society & individuals over all.  You can know someone with the disease without being aware of all of this, hence the need to “raise awareness.” 

  • Anonymous

    Possibly because I didn’t see those other stories, Ryan. That could be it. It might be tough to believe but we don’t have access to ever single news source and news story in the world about sports, cancer research, and fundraising — nor are there enough hours in a day. We can obviously see that you feel passionately about that story you mentioned, so can I ask why you didn’t send it out to all of the sports blogs including us to give it some publicity?  Because if you had, one of us would have written about it.  The pink ice was something I happened to come across while working, so I decided to write it up.  I didn’t sift through a pile of breast cancer awareness stories and settle on that one.

  • Anonymous

    Is Mr. E a little PISSY about something?!?!?!

  • Anonymous

    The Alaska ACES just finished their “Paint The Rink Pink” (for “all” cancer reserch) pre-season series last night. Pink ice, pink sweaters and socks and an arena full of vendors with information on all cancers. They have been doing it for several years now. In the beginning it was a benefit for breast cancer but last year the logo was changed to “Purple With Purpose” for all cancers. All the fans were happy to include all types of cancers to benefit from the event but the Purple was not a big hit so it was changed back to Pink this year and proceeds will go to the American Cancer Society and Breast Cancer Focus Inc. Both local non-profits will use the money to fund programs in Alaska that support all types of cancer. It was two nights of great hockey which raised a lot of money for a good cause.

  • Anonymous

    He just might be Ginger.  As a cancer survivor, prostate, I also am a little “pissy” about the attention that continues to be given to breast cancer.  You almost never hear about other survivors/cancers.  And yes my cancer is survivable if caught early (I’m at ten years), but that didn’t help two of my friends.  Don’t get me wrong I am 100% in support of breast cancer and it’s eradication, having lost two very close friends to it.  But I think it’s time we start supporting ALL cancer research and not putting so much attention on only one.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Ryan-Donkersley/1766675384 Ryan Donkersley

    More people like boobs than balls.

    Lots of people I know that dont support anything like rocking the I love boobs braclet in support of breast cancer awareness.