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Does War Machine have a steroids problem?

War Machine muscles

On the surface, War Machine exhibits obvious signs of a steroid user.

War Machine, whose real name is Jon Koppenhaver, is massive and has unnatural looking muscles. He has veins coming out of everywhere. His muscles have muscles.

On top of that, War Machine seems to have a short fuse and tendency to show aggression. He was arrested for assault five times in a 3-year span from 2009-2011. Ex-girlfriend Christy Mack says he used to beat her weekly. Last week he raged on her and one of her friends, putting Mack in the hospital with severe injuries.

Now War Machine is on the loose and wanted by police, and there is a $10,000 reward offered for his capture. That has led TV star Dog the Bounty Hunter to pursue him.

In an effort to get the word out so he can be aided in his pursuit, Dog has been doing interviews. In an interview with MMA Mania, Dog said he believes War Machine is on drugs and has heard the fighter has a steroids problem.

I think that there is some kind of drug, brother, that is involved, whether it be steroids or some other substance because I hope to God this guy isn’t naturally like this. I don’t think he was drunk. What I found through my initial investigation is that in the last three or four years, his life and personality took a nose dive. That comes from talking to people on both sides — families, neighbors, relatives — we’ve talked to a lot of people already. I think that he needs to turn himself into me, tell his side of the story and get out of whatever is causing him problems. Again, I’ve heard it’s steroids, but whatever, he needs to get in prison, dry out and then maybe come out and be a referee or something.

[Also see: Christy Mack releases horrific War Machine beating photos]

Dog gave War Machine a warning on Tuesday about time ticking before he would pursue the fighter on the run. Dog said he was close to capturing the fighter. We’ll see how this shakes out.

Ex-teammate Marcelo Albir likely ratted out Ryan Braun to MLB

Ryan BraunHow was MLB able to get Ryan Braun to agree to a 65-game suspension in 2013 despite the absence of a failed drug test? There was so much evidence against Braun that the Brewers slugger decided to accept his fate. And where did MLB get all the evidence? Not only did they have Anthony Bosch spilling his guts, but one of Braun’s former Miami teammates, Marcelo Albir, likely ratted on the MVP.

Albir, a 6-foot-1, 190-pound right-hander from Miami, pitched for the Hurricanes in 2003, 2004 and 2006. He was teammates with Braun on the Hurricanes from 2003-2005 (Braun was drafted by the Milwaukee Brewers in ’05).

Albir did not play for Miami in the 2005 season, but you won’t find the reason for his absence from the team in any media report. Gaby Sanchez, a veteran major leaguer currently with the Pittsburgh Pirates, also did not play in the 2005 season, and the reason was never reported until now.

The Miami New Times — which opened up the Biogensis story last year — published an excerpt from a new book entitled “Blood Sport: Alex Rodriguez, Biogenesis, and the Quest to End Baseball’s Steroid Era” on Thursday. The excerpt says Albir and Sanchez were suspended the entire season after testing positive for PEDs.

Miami’s baseball coach, Jim Morris, did not tell his team exactly why the players were suspended, but he supposedly told them they all knew why.

Larry Brown Sports can also confirm that Albir and Sanchez were suspended from the Miami baseball program in 2005 after testing positive for PEDs. LBS was previously told the same information.

Though Albir’s baseball career didn’t go anywhere — his ERA ballooned to 5.23 in 2006 after being at 2.25 in 2004 — he became a conduit between former Miami baseball players in pro ball and Biogenesis.

[Read more...]

Report: Tiger Woods paid Anthony Galea $76K for 14 visits

tiger-woodsTiger Woods has long been linked to performance-enhancing drug use, though there has been no evidence to support the accusations against him. The main reason Tiger has been linked to steroids is that he has received treatments from Canadian doctor Anthony Galea — the same doctor who treated Alex Rodriguez and once admitted to smuggling human growth hormone into the United States.

In the new book “Blood Sport: Alex Rodriguez, Biogenesis and the Quest to End Baseball’s Steroid Era,” authors Tim Elfrink and Gus-Garcia Roberts claim Galea visited Woods a total of 14 times between January and August 2009 and that Woods paid him $76,012 during that span. Tiger was recovering from knee surgery after the 2008 US Open at the time.

While GOLF.com reminds us that Galea has admitted to treating professional athletes with HGH, Galea and Woods have both stated in the past that Tiger received only legal treatments involving platelet-rich plasma therapy.

In addition to being treated by Galea, the book also cited records from the Florida Health Department that show Woods visited with Dr. Mark Lindsay a total of 49 times between September 2008 and October 2009. Tiger reportedly paid Lindsay $118,979. Lindsay is an associate of Galea who also treated A-Rod.

Tiger’s former swing coach Hank Haney told the Golf Channel in 2010 that he watched Galea treat Woods and it was all perfectly normal stuff.

“I was there and watched the whole procedure,” Haney said. “There was never anything that went into Tiger Woods’s body that didn’t come out of his body. They take blood out, they spin it, they inject the plasma back in. I totally believe that Tiger Woods has never taken any performance-enhancing drugs.”

While it’s quite possible that Woods never took performance-enhancing substances, you never want to be linked to the same doctors that treated A-Rod. That guy is basically a walking steroid at this point.

David Ortiz tells MLB Network to shove it after PED comments

David OrtizDavid Ortiz was not happy that his name came up in connection with the John Lackey-Nelson Cruz PED comments, and he let the media know about it.

Lackey was roped by Nelson Cruz and the Baltimore Orioles on Saturday and voice his displeasure over being hit hard by a guy who was suspended last year for PED-ties. In response, many people have pointed out that Lackey has little room to talk considering one of Boston’s top sluggers — Ortiz — has PED ties as well.

Many forget about it, but Ortiz came up on a list of players who allegedly tested positive for PEDs during anonymous testing in 2003. Ortiz said that the positive test came up as a result of tainted supplements.

With that in mind, a host on MLB Network decided to throw in Ortiz’s name when discussing the Lackey-Cruz beef on Monday. Ortiz happened to see that and vented to WEEI on Monday.

“What pisses me off is the whole thing about, why does my name got to be mentioned in that? What did I have to do with that? I saw on MLB the guys talking about it, and then they brought my name up, and one of the guys said that I got a free pass on that,” Ortiz said according to WEEI.com.

“(The MLB Network host) wants to make it sound like I got a free pass because nobody can point fingers at me directly. But the reason why I got that fake (expletive) free pass that he’s saying is because they pointed fingers at me with no proof. It’s easier to do it that way than having something that they can say, ‘Yes, you did this, you did that.’ My (expletive), I call straight up bull. Let me tell you. You don’t get no free pass here, especially a guy like me. I don’t get no free pass. That free pass B.S. that they want to talk about over there, they can shove it up their (expletive).”

Those were some of the comments from Ortiz — you can read the rest of the rant at WEEI — but you get the point.

Ortiz has never gotten a free pass from me. I was very critical of him when the report of his positive test first came up, and I have remained somewhat suspicious since. He says he has passed multiple drug tests since then, including several already this season. And he certainly didn’t get a free pass from Colin Cowherd last year.

The reason it seems like Ortiz has gotten a free pass is because he wasn’t suspended like Cruz. But there are still plenty of people who have suspicion about him, so I would definitely disagree with MLB Network on that.

Dion Jordan looked huge at OTAs before being busted for PEDs

Dion JordanDion Jordan was suspended four games for violating the league’s PED policy, the NFL announced Thursday.

Jordan being busted for PEDs means that the Nos. 3 and 4 picks from the draft last year were both suspended for PED violations in the same week. Lane Johnson, who went fourth overall to the Eagles, was also suspended.

What’s notable is that Jordan looked noticeably bulked up at Miami Dolphins OTAs in May and admitted he was too light during his rookie season.

These nuggets from an Armando Salguero Miami Herald blog post in May were really foreshadowing:

Dion Jordan, the Dolphins first round draft pick, looked as if he took an air pump and plugged it into his arms and shoulders this offseason. That’s how big he looks.

Jordan said he’s “a little over 265″ pounds now.

“I was definitely too light to go out there against some of those offensive tackles,” Jordan conceded.

“This year I had the opportunity to have an offseason where I can take care of my body. I’m trying to move forward and continue to try to better myself in a few areas.”

So now we know where all that bulk came from.

Jordan was trying to bulk up because the Dolphins need him as a 4-3 defensive end instead of being just a pass rusher in a 3-4. They were trying to trade him in the offseason but nothing materialized.

The only good aspect about the suspension is at least Jordan took responsibility for his violation and is not blaming anyone.

“I recently learned from the NFL that I tested positive for stimulants that are banned under the NFL policy. I worked carefully with my advisors and the union to investigate the test results, and I take full responsibility for the test results,” Jordan said in a statement. “I’m very sorry for the impact of this situation on my teammates, coaches, Stephen Ross, the entire Dolphins organization, fans and my family as well. I will continue to work extremely hard during training camp and preseason. During the suspension, I will stay in top shape and will be ready to contribute upon my return.”

Jordan, who was viewed as a reach by the Dolphins at No. 3, is already looking like a bust.

Chael Sonnen fails pre-UFC 175 random drug test

Chael SonnenChael Sonnen, irony is calling your name.

Two weeks after Sonnen mocked Wanderlei Silva for running away from a random drug test that led to Vitor Belfort replacing the Brazilian in the UFC 175 fight, Chael himself was busted for failing a random drug test.

According to ESPN, Sonnen tested positive for illegal substances anastrozole and clomiphene during a random drug test in Las Vegas last month when Sonnen was in town for a UFC news conference. Anastrozole is used to treat breast cancer, while clomiphene is used in cases of female infertility.

This is the second time Sonnen has failed a drug test; he had an elevated T/E ratio in 2010 and was suspended prior to his rematch with Anderson Silva.

Sonnen is a known TRT user and said he would make adjustments in the wake of the UFC/NSAC’s crackdown on the treatment. The substances he tested positive for are used as treatments for hypogonadism, which is the condition Sonnen has that he argues necessitates his TRT.

The Sonnen-Belfort fight has been pulled off the card entirely. Belfort was also set to appear in front of the commission next month for a positive test he had in February. That means the three men playing musical chairs for the fight — Sonnen, Silva and Belfort — all have failed drug tests this year. That is not a good look for the UFC.

Sonnen went on “Jay Mohr Sports” Tuesday to explain the positive test. No surprise, he did his best to talk circles around it.

“They changed the ruling in Nevada earlier this year, doing away with the TRT, testosterone replacement therapy, and I was on that. So when they changed the rule, we all had to go through a transition phase. For me during the transition, I had to take a couple of things. One is called Clomiphene……and another is called HCG (Human Chorionic Gonadotropin). I didn’t fight it or ask for a license. In the interim, they did a test, and I tested positive for these things which I should have because I took them and they were in my system. That wasn’t a surprise. These aren’t anabolics, these aren’t steroids or performance enhancers, but they have deemed that they are banned substances. What’s interesting in my case is that we’re out of competition. These aren’t things that I showed up with on game day. This is out of competition due to a rule that they changed, so it’s an odd spot for me.”

Robert Mathis suspended for PEDs, blames it on fertility issues

Robert MathisRobert Mathis received a four-game suspension for a violation of the NFL’s performance-enhancing drug policy, the league announced on Friday.

Mathis, 33, followed up a 2012 season where he had 8 sacks in 12 games by going for a career-high 19.5 sacks in 2013. You do the math and tell me you’re surprised by this news.

Mathis will miss the Indianapolis Colts’ games against the Broncos, Eagles, Jaguars and Titans at the start of the upcoming season.

Mathis issued a statement and blamed the PED suspension on fertility issues. Seriously. Below is his statement via Adam Schefter:

“It is difficult for me to address the circumstances surrounding this suspension because they involve very personal medical information, but it is very important to me that my fans, particularly young people, understand what did and did not occur. Like many families, my wife and I faced fertility challenges, and I sought medical assistance. I specifically asked the doctor if the medication he prescribed for me would present a problem for NFL drug testing, and unfortunately, he incorrectly told me that it would not. I made the mistake of not calling the NFL or NFLPA to double check before I took the medication at the end of last season. The union has worked very closely with me to present all of the facts and medical records for consideration of discipline that does not include a suspension because of the unique facts of my case, but the Commissioner refused the request. I am deeply saddened that this situation will prevent me from contributing to my team for four games, and I regret that I didn’t cross check what my doctor told me before I took the medication. I hope that my fans will understand the unique circumstances involved here and continue to know that I am a man of integrity who would never intentionally circumvent the performance enhancing substance policy agreed to by the NFL and my union. The incredible blessing of this very upsetting situation is that, after I took the medication very briefly at the end of last season, we learned that my wife is expecting a baby. We are thrilled that we will be welcoming a new member in several months, but I apologize to my teammates, coaches and Colts fans that I will not be able to contribute to my team for the first four weeks of the 2014 season. I will work extremely hard during that time to stay in top football shape and will be prepared to contribute immediately upon my return.”