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Jerry Jones, Cowboys accuse Giants of faking injuries to slow their offense

Jerry-Jones-Concussions-PresidentThe New York Giants struggled tremendously to slow the Dallas Cowboys down on Sunday night. Six turnovers from Eli Manning and company didn’t help, but there were times when Dallas had the G-Men on their heels even with a banged-up Tony Romo. According to Jerry Jones, it could have been worse if the Giants weren’t faking injuries.

“I thought us experts on football were the only ones who could see that,” Jones said when asked if he thought New York was putting on an act, per The Star-Telegram. “I didn’t know everybody could. It was so obvious it was funny. It wasn’t humorous because we really wanted the advantage and knew we could get it if we could get the ball snapped.”

The question stemmed from Jason Witten’s reaction to Giants defensive lineman Cullen Jenkins dropping to the turf with an injury in the second quarter. Witten had just picked up a first down and was rushing back to the line of scrimmage with the rest of his teammates when Jenkins began shaking his arm and went down. Cameras then captured Witten clearly yelling, “He’s faking!” at an official.

We can expect to see a lot more of this if the 2013 season progresses the way it began this past week. More and more teams are turning to no-huddle offenses in an attempt to tire out opponents and put up points in a hurry. New York did the same thing on Sunday night, and if not for fumbles and interceptions they may have been able to pull out a win with their up-tempo offense.

[Video: Georgia linebacker fakes injury after getting signal from coach]

Last week, Brian Urlacher revealed that the Chicago Bears used to receive a signal from the sidelines when their coaching staff wanted to them fake an injury. It’s by no means a new concept, but it will become a more popular debate topic if fast-paced attacks continue to be the theme.

Jerry Jones: You’re going to give me credit when Cowboys win a Super Bowl, right?

As the years pass, more Dallas Cowboys fans are becoming fed up with owner Jerry Jones serving as the team’s general manager. The Cowboys have not won a Super Bowl since 1995, and Jones is 70 years old. Many believe the game is starting to pass Jerruh by, but he is committed to remaining involved with football decisions and not just being the checkbook behind the operation.

Not only that, but Jones wants to make sure he gets some credit in the event that the Cowboys do eventually hoist another Vince Lombardi Trophy while he still owns the team.

“I pretty much go with what I did the night I bought the team,” Jones said at the scouting combine in Indianapolis last week, via the Star-Telegram. “I said I was going to be the GM. … It would be a facade if someone else was sitting in my shoes and someone thought they were spending the money. It would be deception. … I would grant you the decisions that have been made over the years have not produced a Super Bowl, two Super Bowls or three Super Bowls that I would like to have been a part of. And the only thing I am going to do there is keep trying and then make sure I get the credit when we do get that one. Y’all are going to give it to me, aren’t you?”

Don’t worry, Jerruh. If there’s one thing we know about sports, it’s that fans are capable of forgiving and forgetting quicker than any other collection of people in any other facet of life.

Jones once said he would have fired himself as GM by now if he was on the outside looking in. Fans have submitted a petition to the White House requesting that Jones be removed as the Cowboys’ owner. Should Dallas win a Super Bowl in the next few years, none of that will matter. If they don’t, the resentment toward Jones will continue to grow at a rapid pace.

Helmet smack to Shutdown Corner

Cowboys have a new luxury bus that costs around $2 million (Video)

Cowboys-luxury-busThe offseason has barely even begun, but the Dallas Cowboys wasted no time making a huge splash. Although the free agency period has not opened, that didn’t stop Jerry Jones from making a $2 million acquisition. Meet “The Elegant Lady” — the Cowboys’ new state-of-the-art motorcoach.

The bus contains more television sets than the average household. It also has what driver Emory Tyler describes as a “salon.” The back stateroom area, where Tyler said Jones primarily hangs out, includes three flat-screen TVs. We wouldn’t want anyone having to turn their head now, would we? The motorcoach made its debut at the Super Bowl in New Orleans.

“People were there with kids in their Cowboys pajamas wanting to take pictures of me and the bus,” Tyler told the Dallas Morning News. “I know I’m not a celebrity, but people want my autograph anyway. A lot.”

Before you go ranting about how the Cowboys can spend money on a $2 million bus but can’t put together a championship team, just remember there is a salary cap in football. Jones may be the wrong man for the general manager job in Dallas, but people with personal eyeglass cleaners (yes, we know that wasn’t really the case) generally aren’t afraid to throw money around. At least he can sit in his new motor coach and watch other teams fight for a Super Bowl.

Jerry Jones and Jay Ratliff reportedly had ‘volcanic’ confrontation after game

Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones and defensive tackle Jay Ratliff reportedly had to be separated following the team’s 20-19 win over the Cincinnati Bengals on Sunday after having a heated confrontation.

CBS Dallas/Forth Worth’s Mike Fisher says the incident started when Jones went up to Ratliff in the locker room after the game and said, “We need you.” Ratliff has missed seven games this season because of a combination of injuries, and he did not play on Sunday. He hasn’t played since Week 11, and it’s likely he was upset with the inference from Jones that he’s not doing enough to get out there.

Fisher was told the face-to-face exchange was “volcanic,” and that the 70-year-old owner did not back down to the 6-foot-4 300-plus pound defensive lineman.

“They’re both passionate men and great men and they want to win, that’s all it is,” a source told Fisher. “But they were in each other’s faces. People had to intervene.”

Head coach Jason Garrett addressed the matter on Monday.

“I don’t want to get into any specifics about a situation like that,” Garrett said, via the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. “I do know this: Jay Ratliff loves to play football. He loves to be out there. He loves to compete. I think he loves his teammates and this team. And if he was able to play, he’d be out there playing.”

This is probably the exact sort of reason why the Cowboys locked Jones out of the locker room after a game earlier this season.

Ratliff signed a five-year, $40 million extension in 2011. He had not missed a game in four seasons prior to the injury-filled season this year. This also is not Ratliff’s first locker-room confrontation; you may recall that a year ago he had a heated confrontation with a reporter in the team’s locker room.

Between the frustration of him missing time this year and Sunday’s confrontation, I wouldn’t be surprised to see the Cowboys look elsewhere to replace him. Interestingly enough, Josh Brent was set to start in Ratliff’s place, but he was in jail for intoxicated manslaughter.

Cowboys fan petitions President Obama to remove Jerry Jones as owner

Forget message boards and sports talk radio, White House petitions are the new creative outlet for fans looking to express their displeasure.

Taking a cue from Ohio State fans, a disgruntled Dallas Cowboys fan submitted a petition to the White House on Monday that asks President Obama to remove Jerry Jones as the team’s owner and GM.

“We, the Citizens of the Great State of Texas, and Dallas Cowboys fans worldwide, have been oppressed by an over controlling, delusional, oppressive dictator for way too long,” the petition states. “Request the Executive Branch’s immediate assistance in removal of owner and GM, Jerry Jones. His incompetence and ego have not only been an extreme disappointment for way too long, but moreover, it has caused extreme mental and emotional duress.”

The petition was created on Friday Nov. 23, the day after the Cowboys lost 38-31 to the Washington Redskins to drop to 5-6. It was pretty hilariously categorized as a “human rights” issue. 25,000 signatures are needed by Dec. 23 to reach the petition’s goal.

Since it will likely be removed by the White House website like this one, we snagged a screenshot of what it looks like:

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Jerry Jones was reportedly locked out of locker room and furious after Falcons loss

If Jerry Jones was unhappy with the way the Dallas Cowboys had played leading up to Sunday night’s loss to the Atlanta Falcons, he must be irate now. The Cowboys’ offense sputtered once again on its way to a 19-13 loss, lowering their record to 3-5.

After the game, Jones was looking to get into the locker room to likely share a few not-so-nice words with his team. Or maybe he was looking to inspire them with kindness. Whatever the case, he was reportedly shut down.

It could have been a simple misunderstanding, of course, but one would think he would have to have been locked out for more than a few seconds to become that angry. Before the game, it was revealed that Jones said he would have fired himself as GM by now based on some of the decisions he has made. Perhaps the team was doing him a favor.

If Jones was intentionally locked out of the locker room (and we’re not saying he was), you can’t blame him for being furious. Whether the players and coaches wanted to hear from him or not, he is their boss. They don’t really have a choice.

Jerry Jones would have fired himself as GM

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Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones admits that his performance as the team’s GM has merited a firing.

Jones made his comments during an interview with NBC Sports’ Bob Costas that aired before the Cowboys played the Atlanta Falcons on “Sunday Night Football.”

Asked by Costas for a self-critique of his work as GM, Jones responded, “I think [the criticism is] valid. We’ve had four division titles since we’ve won our last Super Bowl. We’ve had six losing seasons since we won our last Super Bowl. That’s not acceptable.

When asked if he would have fired himself, Jones said yes.

“Well I think so, because he was there to dismiss,” said Jones. “I’ve always worked for myself, and you can’t do that. You basically have to straighten that guy out in the mirror when you work for yourself. I’ve done it with coaches, and I certainly would have changed general managers.

“The truth is, in the NFL, if you’re active and involved as an owner, that’s the final thing. That’s the way it works.

“Let’s don’t kid ourselves: When it gets down to the real, heavy, hard decisions, you have owners make those decisions — that’s as it should be,” he told Costas.

Though Jones says he probably would have fired a GM who fared how he has, he thinks he can fix things.

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