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Friday, July 19, 2019

Baltimore’s Freddie Gray protestors looking to force Orioles game cancellation

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Protestors who were expressing their outrage over the death of Freddie Gray throughout the streets of Baltimore on Saturday were looking to force a cancellation of the Baltimore Orioles’ game against the Boston Red Sox.

Gray, a 25-year-old African-American man, died in a hospital on Friday a week after suffering a spinal injury that allegedly occurred while he was being arrested. Baltimore police officers pinned Gray to the ground after a foot chase on April 12, and he was reportedly put into a police van and driven to the station. Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts admitted on Friday that Gray was not properly buckled while he was being transported.

“We know he was not buckled in the transportation wagon, as he should have been. No excuses for that, period,” Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts said Friday, per Elisha Fieldstadt of NBC News. “We know our police employees failed to get him medical attention in a timely manner multiple times.”

As a result of Gray’s death and Baltimore Police’s admission of negligence, hundreds of protesters filled the streets of Baltimore near Oriole Park before Saturday’s game. LBS reader Rory Calnan, who was at the game, sent us several photos and videos that show what the scene was like. (Warning: Explicit language)

Fans who attempted to enter the ballpark through the main entrance were being told they needed to use other gates.

Protestors yelled through the Camden Yards gates that police killed an “innocent man.”


Police vehicles were also being vandalized at an undisclosed location in Baltimore. It is unclear where that activity occurred in relation to Oriole Park.

Despite the hectic scene, the game was still scheduled to start on time. Hopefully the police presence is enough to keep things peaceful and under control.



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