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Mariners Are Offensively Challenged

Last year the Mariners may have won 85 games and finished 3rd in the AL West, but they were last in the American League in runs scored. During the offseason they made several moves that had me and several other AL fans concerned. In addition to acquiring Cy Young winner Cliff Lee, the Mariners signed Chone Figgins away from the Angels, and they traded for Milton Bradley and Casey Kotchman. Despite all their moves, it’s become apparent through 25 games that it’s the same old Seattle story.

The Mariners just got swept by the Rangers, scoring only four runs in three games. To make matters more frustrating, they spoiled 11 scoreless innings from their staff on Friday night (including seven thrown by starter Cliff Lee), and eight scoreless innings from Doug Fister on Sunday. Manager Don Wakamatsu has seen enough of the club’s offensive struggles: “If somebody said you’d throw 26 scoreless innings in a three-game series and get swept, I’d think you were crazy. But that’s what happened. It just kind of tells you the shape of the offense right now.”

The Mariners are tied with the Pirates for the third worst offense in MLB based on runs scored. The only other AL team that’s stinking it up more is the Cleveland Indians. Seattle’s also tied with Houston for the fewest home runs in MLB with a measly nine. Even though the Mariners are offensively challenged at this point I expect them to pick it up. They have several hitters currently underachieving who should be doing much better. One of the biggest problems they’re facing is that they don’t have any true three or four hitters on the team, and that puts extra pressure on guys who should be batting towards the bottom of the lineup but are now in the middle. Where’s Richie Sexson when you need him?

Sources:
Mariners waste another pitching performance, swept by Rangers [Seattle PI]



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  • Gene

    The Mariners should have scored more against the Rangers, to be sure. However, the main reason for their lack of production, particularly home runs, is the dimensions of their new ballpark. What did management expect? It takes a perfectly timed swing to hit a home run to left field. The trade off for this lack fo production is the great starting pitching. The other teams are not doing very well at Seattle, either.