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Stephen Curry Hits the Nike Laboratory to Figure Out How He’s Injuring His Ankle

Stephen Curry has sprained his ankle multiple times. These things don’t just happen. You can’t injure your ankle more than one time playing professional basketball. It just doesn’t make any sense. So what type of explanation could there be for this unusual phenomenon? It must be the shoes.

According to the San Francisco Chronicle, Curry recently traveled to the Nike laboratory in Beaverton, Ore. His mission: finding a shoe that fits properly.  Curry had his shoes and foot analyzed and came to the conclusion that his ankle has a tendency to roll outward, which has been causing his low ankle sprains.

Curry has decided to switch to a different sneaker while he waits for the complete analysis to come in. He has changed to a Nike shoe that fits lower and wider.

You really can do anything with technology these days.  You think Bill Russell underwent a foot and sneaker analysis when he tweaked a muscle or sprained his ankle back in the day?  If it works, I guess it’s worth it.  It just seems a little over the top to me.  Maybe I’m old fashioned even though I’m 23. Does that make sense?

Chest bump to I Am a GM for passing the story along

Stephen Curry Wears Half Davidson-Half Duke Jersey to Support Alma Mater, Brother

There aren’t many things in sports that are lamer than the two-sided jersey. Warriors guard Stephen Curry was in attendance Friday night to watch his alma mater, Davidson, take on Duke. Since Stephen’s brother Seth Curry plays for Duke, he decided to break out the two-sided jersey to support both his brother and his old college team. The last person we saw do this was Brady Quinn’s sister to show her allegiance to Brady and her boyfriend, A.J. Hawk.  Need we say more?

Photo Credit: Bret Strelow

Well, I Guess That’s One Way to Stop Stephen Curry

Almost as inherently as I’m drawn to the points category in a basketball boxscore, I’m interested in the field goals made and the field goals attempted by a player. For instance, 30 points is great and all, but how spectacular is it if you had to bomb up 24 shots to get that mark? Or last week for example, everybody was going gaga for Stephen Curry after he scored 44 points in a showdown with Oklahoma. Only problem is he did so shooting 41% from the field in a loss. That was the bottom line to me — not the 44 points — but the loss. Was it worth it? Well, we kind of had our test case in the matter as Loyola of Maryland decided they would make a conscious effort to shutdown Curry.

From the moment the ball was tossed up to start Tuesday night’s game against Loyola (Md.), Davidson’s star guard was hounded by two defenders.

“I’ve never seen anything like it,” Davidson coach Bob McKillop told FOXSports.com shortly after the victory. “From the time the ball entered the court, there were two guys on him and they didn’t leave him the entire game.”

So Curry decided that he would hang out by the sidelines to make it a 4 on 3 game for his team — a clear advantage. Curry’s personal stats took it in the shorts as he went 0-3 with zero points for the game, but his team won easily, 78-48. I’m guessing they wouldn’t have won by as large of a margin had Loyola (Md) played a standard defense and not allowed the open man each time. Curry took it well and decided to put the team first, something I really respect. And I think this further cements my point: it’s not about how much the top scorer gets, it’s about how much he helped his team while scoring the points.