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Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Floyd Mayweather Jr. says he lost $900k on Packers-Seahawks Hail Mary

Floyd Mayweather Jr. used to love posting pictures of his winning sports betting tickets on Twitter and Instagram, but the joke was that he never posted any losing tickets. He clearly wasn’t being real with his fans, because a) if he were really winning hundreds of thousands by the day, sports books would stop taking his bets and b) anyone who is betting halftime lines as frequently as Mayweather does is surely losing more than he’s winning.

When Mayweather finally posted a losing ticket on Twitter, it was only for the amount of $100,000, which was a fraction of the amount of money he led us to believe he was winning.

During an interview with Jim Rome, Mayweather was finally put on the spot about his sports betting, and he admitted he has lost some large sums on games.

Mayweather was the interview subject for “10 questions” on “Jim Rome on Showtime” which aired a new episode Wednesday night. He was asked about his biggest gambling win and loss.

The boxer estimated that his biggest winning ticket was for $1.1 or $1.2 million, though he did not specify the event. He also guessed that his biggest loss was $1 million. He then elaborated.

“I lost when Green Bay … Seattle Seahawks threw the pass at the end. I lost 900 grand,” said Mayweather.

Rome asked Mayweather how pissed he was at the outcome, which was generated by replacement officials. Mayweather shrugged and answered, “It comes with a territory.”

Mayweather made some other interesting revelations during the interview. He said if he hadn’t gone into boxing, he hopefully would have gone to college at Harvard and gotten a degree in business. When asked about the one thing he doesn’t mess with — a question inspired by Kobe Bryant saying he doesn’t mess with bees — Mayweather answered “married women.”

It was no surprise that Mayweather was the first interview subject for the second season of Rome’s Showtime show; Mayweather recently switched pay-per-view networks from HBO to Showtime, so it was a good opportunity for the network to promote two of its newest and biggest stars.



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